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-   -   Ultra Violet Flies? (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/flies/349432-ultra-violet-flies.html)

andrew_rigsby 04-21-2014 10:25 AM

Ultra Violet Flies?
 
This weekend I stopped by the local fly shop on my way to the river. The owner told me that UV flies are really producing alot of fish right now and pointed me towards an olive wooly bugger. He put it under a black light and showed me how it looks to a fish. I shrugged, said ok, and grabbed one.

During the day I wasnt having much luck, so I had my dad put on an olive wooly bugger and I put on the UV version of the EXACT same fly. Fishing ten feet apart I caught three fish in the first five minutes. I had him put it on and he brought in several fish as well. The UV fly seemed to be much more successful than its normal counterpart.

My question is, has anyone ever dealt with UV materials when tying? Does it really look that different to a fish? Thanks as always for your valued opinions.

planettrout 04-21-2014 11:02 AM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
I threw all my UV 2 materials away, because a number of "experts" around here stated they would not improve my catch ratio...

http://i305.photobucket.com/albums/n...ps7dca1d3a.jpg

http://i305.photobucket.com/albums/n...psfb6583a2.jpg

...NOT


PT/TB :p

fredaevans 04-21-2014 11:40 AM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
From personal experience UV materials really do 'Bring something to the Party' with Steelhead and Salmon ties.

silver creek 04-21-2014 03:17 PM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew_rigsby (Post 660224)
This weekend I stopped by the local fly shop on my way to the river. The owner told me that UV flies are really producing alot of fish right now and pointed me towards an olive wooly bugger. He put it under a black light and showed me how it looks to a fish. I shrugged, said ok, and grabbed one.

During the day I wasnt having much luck, so I had my dad put on an olive wooly bugger and I put on the UV version of the EXACT same fly. Fishing ten feet apart I caught three fish in the first five minutes. I had him put it on and he brought in several fish as well. The UV fly seemed to be much more successful than its normal counterpart.

My question is, has anyone ever dealt with UV materials when tying? Does it really look that different to a fish? Thanks as always for your valued opinions.

There are 3 kinds of "UV" materials.

Human's cannot see much UV below 370 nanometers. So if the material glowed or looked different under the black light it was either fluorescence or phosphorescence.

http://www.yorku.ca/eye/lambdas.htm

In fluorescence the material absorbs UV photon and re-emits it immediately at a lower frequency in the visible range.


In phosphorescence the material absorbs UV photons and re-emits it over time.


UV photons have higher energy that visible light and can penetrate deeper into water and so there are relatively more UV photons, the deeper the fly gets. Therefore, both fluorescence and phosphoresce flies are more visible as the water gets deeper.

UV reflectance is the third type of tying material. This is material that reflects UV light that WE CANNOT SEE. So it would not look any different to you than non-uv material under a black light. If the UV fly looked different to you under a black light than a non-UV fly, it contained either fluorescent and/or phosphorescent materials.

Whether it contains UV reflecting materials cannot be determined by shining UV black light on it because we cannot see the reflected UV light.

irons 04-21-2014 06:57 PM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
I know in conventional tackle uv is a big thing on deep running crank baits but I never really gave it much thought in fly fishing. Guess it may work ok on subsurface presentations.

silver creek 04-21-2014 09:15 PM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
Lets be very honest about “UV” materials.

Take a look at the Spirit River UV2 materials below under UV light. They glow. They are fluorescent materials and we have had fluorescent materials for quite a while.

They are look brighter to us and they look brighter to the trout but that is NOT because they REFLECT UV. For a material to fluoresce it has to ABSORB UV. If it is ABSORBING it CANNOT be REFLECTING.

The labeling on the last package even says “Fl” for fluorescent chartreuse.

http://www.bearsden.com/media/spirit...v2_example.jpg

https://www.feather-craft.com/images/ip041422.jpg

http://m.deercreek.co.uk/243_400_csupload_56754176.jpg

andrew_rigsby 04-21-2014 10:15 PM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
Wow this is some awesome stuff guys! Next time I am there I will be sure to get the exact details, although I am pretty sure it was UV2 materials maybe it wasnt a black light and I just thought it was. Either way this is some awesome information and alot to think about. Im still curious about on the water experiences if anyone has some two cents on that. :)

grtlksmarlin 04-21-2014 10:26 PM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
Though no spectroscopic physicist or ophthalmologist, let me toss in perhaps a worthless two cents worth from a Bow Hunters point of view.....and do your own research as much of this post could be flawed.

Hunting hours in at least my state for many species typically lasts until 1/2 hour past sunset. The reason for that is in that though you may no longer have direct sunlight, you do never the less reap the benefits of reflected sunlight. Essentially light reflecting of of our atmosphere slowly fading to total darkness 1/2 hour past true sunset. Lower wavelengths "supposedly" not reflecting as well, higher better.

Now perhaps my vision is simply more sensitive to it (in addition to I also have outstanding night vision so rarely use a light), yet I at least and others I have spoken with just after true sunset will suddenly see a significant burst of light that slowly fades until quitting time. Literally, colors will be more intense, contrast is enhanced dramatically, and you actually lose a lot of the haze of direct sunlight and perhaps more significantly the confusion of shadows.

"Supposedly" that phenomena occurs due to the reduction of visible light, most assuradly direct sunlight, yet also due to higher wavelengths of light including UV light reflected now more obvious as it does its thing not overpowered in our vision spectrum by lower wavelengths of light (though know that is simply what product manufacturers have stated, how credible their scientists testing I have no idea).

It is not that things suddenly glow due to high spectrum and UV light, just that certain colors/objects/materials become enhanced and more obvious in contrast to seeing a full unrestrained spectrum of light. To myself it just means that certain colors become more obvious instead of muted.....and though they say certain animals, birds, fish, and insects can "see" UV light, I would not be surprised if it turned out that they "see" high frequency & UV exactly the same way I recognize it though even much more enhanced.

In a nutshell, it is due to a filters within our eye. Perhaps mine and others with great night vision have lower quality filters, or perhaps most folks just have never paid attention to it......In any case, many game animals do not have those filters or at least not to the degree we do. So they along with other reasons see better during low light....Again I'm betting it is due to contrast.

To capitalize upon this time, weapon sight manufacturers make what they claim are UV affected materials....Essentially plastics that "seem" to glow or really more get brighter actually looking as though lit up.....They will actually look as though a powered light is fueling them.

All of that said......Under water longer wavelengths of light are absorbed quickly (orange and red). Shorter wavelengths are not (green and blue).....Yet oddly to our discussion UV is also absorbed quickly.

To that end.....and perhaps even explaining my own low light acute vision, it might be more that what they claim as "UV reflective" is really more "higher wavelength reflective".....and by capitalizing upon that, you're capitalizing on the wavelengths of light that reach the fish the best.

In kind, it would not surprise me if in contrast to the glowing blue images used to demonstrate supposed "UV" reflectiveness, in reality it would simply mean that under the right spectrum of light the object simply stands out more, or is more contrasting then usual.

The result being compared to everything else, it looks, lit up.

Just not like those glowing blue pictures.

Just a logical guess of a bowhunter (you know, those guys not smart enough to come in out of the rain or cold....so dull witted they can sit for hours unmoving and be perfectly content).

B.E.F.

bigjim5589 04-22-2014 12:51 AM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
As far as tying materials go, I've tried different things including "UV", fluorescent, and phosphorescent materials, and none are "magic". In certain situations they all may have a place that improves the productivity of the flies, but IMO, use of these materials may not be any better than those without the "features" these materials are advertised to possess much of the time under conditions we may all find most of the time. As Silver's information suggested, those times that any of these materials seemed to improve my flies, has been in deeper water application's and in particular on darker days. However, I don't feel that the use of these materials alone contribute significantly to any fly. There are other design features in our most productive flies, and these still have to be present. You can't simply tie some UV or other materials mentioned to a hook & expect it to perform miracles.

mojo 04-22-2014 05:34 AM

Re: Ultra Violet Flies?
 
I like and use UV flies. They work for me and Joni. What doesn't seem to work is that UV spray you put on, let it dry and fish it. At least it doesn't seem to work for me. There are some that swear by it though.


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