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Old 04-01-2008, 09:28 AM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

No experience with fly fishing and I don't have someone to work with but there is a mentoring program with the local TU.
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Old 04-01-2008, 12:27 PM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

Hi ab4usa,

Buying flies for a beginner can be challenging. Your list is a generic list and you don't need all of the flies listed. Unless some of these flies are on a hatch you may not catch any fish. I think it is a mistake for a beginner to start with too many flies. If you don't catch anything you are spending all your time changing flies because you think that is the problem. You need to learn what is a dry fly, a wet fly, a nymph and so on. Learning how to cast and manage you line is very important to learn at first. You need to learn how to get a drag free drift and how to rig for different types of fishing. When you are ready to go fishing talk to a local fly shop and ask what are the fish taking or what type of fly is working. Buy what he recommends and go fish with them. Three of each type and size is a good number to start with.

I think the best way to start is with nymphs or wet flies. Unless you on the river in the middle of a specific dry fly hatch I would not fish dry flies at first. You need some good searching patterns that work every where. I would carry some Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear, Prince Nymph, Woolly Bugger, Copper John, Pheasant Tail nymph, Soft Hackle, and a few Midges. If you want a bare bones list I would go with the Prince Nymph, Soft Hackle, Woolly Bugger and some midges.

These flies will catch trout just about any where in North America. The very best advice I can give you is to hire a guide in the area you will fish the most. Use his flies and see what works. Then buy your flies. Keep in mind that what may work in the Spring won't necessarily work in the fall.

Now if you walk into a shop and they say the Sulfur Hatch is on or the Hoppers are on the water, or some such thing, you need to buy those dry flies and have a go at it.

Frank
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Old 04-01-2008, 01:02 PM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

it's so easy to get caught up in amassing a huge collection of flies in various sizes and colors, of all types. it may be inevitable as beginners. i know i felt like i just NEEDED a wide selection because who KNEW what would work that day on the water. i'd recommend trying very hard to limit/simplify your approach at this stage; as wrttten, casting and line control is enough to work on at this stage. heed what the others have said. 5-6 years into this myself, i'm starting to go through the minimalist approach. i think this season, i may keep two nymph patterns, a light and a dark one, then maybe 2-3 dry patterns, for stream trout.

eric
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Old 04-01-2008, 01:45 PM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

Hi Eric,

When I started fly fishing the Sierras I had 4 flies. A dry and wet Coachman, a dry California Mosquito and a dry Black Gnat. Later I added an Adams Irresistible and dropped the Mosquito and Gnat. Between the Irresistible and the Coachman I had all that I needed.

Frank
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Old 04-01-2008, 10:26 PM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

Those saying that casting a drift control are most important at this stage are absolutely right. Here's why: getting the fly to where the fish are, and making it move (actually- not move) in an appealing way are MUCH more important than what fuzzy hook you have tied on.

There's a great story in a great book called "Wisdom of the Guides" told by Al Troth (inventor of the Elk Hair Caddis) that illustrates this point. al was guiding a client that swore up and down that the fly selection was the reason why he couldn't catch a fish. Al found a bare hook in the proper size, yanked a short section of yarn from his wool sock, quickly fashioned a fly, and caught a trout on the first cast. (Its a really good book, I highly recommend it.)

I think its safe to say that you could head anywhere trout swim equipped with pheasant tails and copper johns in size 14 and 18 (12 flies total, 3 each) and catch trout. But if you can't get them to the needed depth and fish a good drift, you're just getting casting practice.
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Old 04-02-2008, 02:02 AM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

not intentionally hijacking ab4usa's thread, but yeah, i agree frank. to illustrate how it can get out of hand, i started out with an adams.

then added parachute adams. then red and yellow humpies. then i discovered even small royal wulffs are easier to see. then i found the irresistable. then i discovered cheap flies on ebay and collected emergers, nymphs of various types, elk hair caddises. then sloane's paralyzer (THAT was fun to fish). then BWOs, then crippled BWOs. WHOA, and then i had no idea how effective black parachute ants would be... and hoppers, and the kings river caddis. etc etc.

in the summer, in the sierra, the streams i fish are not that challenging. since i like dries for the fun factor, i could stick with 2 adams, 2 elk hair caddises and 2 black parachute ants for a fun day. though i have to say, at the very beginning, i'd lose so many flies to trees it was very frustrating.

eric
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Old 04-17-2008, 11:07 AM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Whiton View Post
Hi ab4usa,

Buying flies for a beginner can be challenging. Your list is a generic list and you don't need all of the flies listed. Unless some of these flies are on a hatch you may not catch any fish. I think it is a mistake for a beginner to start with too many flies. If you don't catch anything you are spending all your time changing flies because you think that is the problem. You need to learn what is a dry fly, a wet fly, a nymph and so on. Learning how to cast and manage you line is very important to learn at first. You need to learn how to get a drag free drift and how to rig for different types of fishing. When you are ready to go fishing talk to a local fly shop and ask what are the fish taking or what type of fly is working. Buy what he recommends and go fish with them. Three of each type and size is a good number to start with.

I think the best way to start is with nymphs or wet flies. Unless you on the river in the middle of a specific dry fly hatch I would not fish dry flies at first. You need some good searching patterns that work every where. I would carry some Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear, Prince Nymph, Woolly Bugger, Copper John, Pheasant Tail nymph, Soft Hackle, and a few Midges. If you want a bare bones list I would go with the Prince Nymph, Soft Hackle, Woolly Bugger and some midges.

These flies will catch trout just about any where in North America. The very best advice I can give you is to hire a guide in the area you will fish the most. Use his flies and see what works. Then buy your flies. Keep in mind that what may work in the Spring won't necessarily work in the fall.

Now if you walk into a shop and they say the Sulfur Hatch is on or the Hoppers are on the water, or some such thing, you need to buy those dry flies and have a go at it.

Frank
Along these same lines...as I am also just starting out. I bought two books. One book from Orvis provides a general overview and includes many stream tactics and the other book is specifically geared to PA trout fishing. If you haven't bought a book that gives the broader overview, I highly recommend it!

Amazon.com: The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, Completely Revised and Updated with Over 400 New Color Photos and Illustrations (Orvis): Tom Rosenbauer: Books

Amazon.com: Flyfisher's Guide to Pennsylvania (Flyfisher's Guide Series): Dave Wolf: Books
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Old 04-24-2008, 12:50 PM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

Jus an FYI, but Orvis has a special where you can get 20 of their most popular flies for $9.95 and free shipping.

http://www.orvis.com/store/product_c...758&pf_id=76TK
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Old 04-24-2008, 01:11 PM
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Default Re: How many for a rookie?

I'm with Cliff on this...putting your fly where fish are in a lifelike manner is THE most important thing. I also agree with Cliff on the Phesant Tail and Copper John nymphs.... I carry a box of many nymph patterns and end up using these 2 - 90% of the time. On the dry fly side - gets some Adams Parachute (easy to see), some Elk hair Caddis, some Orange and Yellow Stimulators...and some Royal Wulffs (excellent seraching pattern)...A few hoppers, ants and beetles and you are good to go.... Less than 10 patterns and you can fish anywhere in America. You might thow in a couple of soft hackle wets as well.
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