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Old 04-22-2011, 11:25 PM
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Default Re: Casting weighted streamers

i would agree with mojo, dont overcast the rod. let the rod do the work. i can cast a clouser 50 feet no prob on my 9 ft. 7 weight. let the technology work its magic.
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Old 04-23-2011, 09:08 AM
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Default Re: Casting weighted streamers

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrome_jones View Post
Mojo, I'm curious about this, cause, I'm still trying to figure it out myself. Is what you are saying .. to move your arm further back to 2 o'clock so the rod bends less? Just unrolling line by its own accord, instead of stopping short and letting the rod load? Confused but curious.

- Jones
Glad you mentioned that. Thank you. Thinking the 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock position, I got it backwards. Wasn't thinking right. Stop on the 10 o'clock position on the back cast is what I should have said. That way the rod loads correctly.

For distance casting I do take the rod back to the 2 o'clock position.
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Old 04-23-2011, 10:54 AM
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Default Re: Casting weighted streamers

I cast streamer against convential wisdom. I actually use a shorter stroke and hual and don't open my loops.

Many casters, I believe, open their loops to help keep the fly from hitting the rod tip. This will work, but willl also weaken the cast.

Forming a good tight loop, when done correctly, willl not cause the streamer to hit the rod tip.

Also, to fish below the surface, I prefer to use a sinking line rather than a heavy flie.

Finally, all casters, especially when there's wind make bad casts; so I always wear a broad-brimmed hat and wear sunglasses.

Randy
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Old 04-27-2011, 02:50 PM
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Default Re: Casting weighted streamers

Thanks for clarifying Mojo. It seems, even in a simple thread as this, there are many ways to skin a cat. I was trying to follow your logic, but didn't quite understand.

Even in this simple context, there are folks discussing, tight loops and open loops, they all seem to be finding the results they want, for their conditions. I'm always open to a new method to experiment with. I see what your saying for distance, could make sense either way, so I was just curious.

Being not far removed from a 20' streamer cast, I can remember my cheats and fails quite clearly. Sometimes, the conflicting info from the veterans can be quite confusing for us newbies. I don't mean to give bad expert advice, as I realize slapping a streamer all over the water is pretty sloppy. But, as a fly chucker with limited skills, it was a stage that got me in the feeding zone faster, and catching more fish, without serious impalements, or excessive casting knots. Then again, I tried to preface as being no expert. I just was excited, because it seems to me that targeting those, big, aggressive, territorial fish can be really FUN!!!! And streamers can really **** 'em off.

Next point, for weighted streamer distance, after finally getting comfortable in intermediate casting skills, do you recommend back casting low and flat like you explained with weighty rigs? Would I forward cast stopping short and rod tip up near vertical, to loop that very openly, and lob it for more distance?

What did you think of the article, Rip suggested, I am still trying to digest it from words to water.

Thanks all

-Jones
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Old 04-28-2011, 08:41 AM
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Default Re: Casting weighted streamers

Quote:
Stop on the 10 o'clock position on the back cast is what I should have said. That way the rod loads correctly.
Mojo,

I think you're confusing yourself.

I do it all the time, especially when calling out fish locations. I actually prefer calling out fish directions as plus 2 oclock and minus 2 o'clock. Minus being to the left. I feel like an idiot when fishing with guide buddies of mine, but it works and they don't beat me up about it too much.

Perhaps it's because the longest a watch has ever lasted me before I broke it was a week or so. My total lifetime of watch-wearing is certainly less than 3 weeks. I can't stand restrictions of any sort. Shoes are bad enough.

The Belgium cast, ellliptical cast and Lefty cast are all basically the same cast, and the rod is generally not "stopped" hard at any clock position, but is decellerated to form a loop and continues in that same general direction until the rod is nearly horizontal usually. The casting stroke makes an ellilpse, changing planes from back to front, rather than remaining in the same plane as with a traditional overhead cast (straight back, straight front in the same plane). This all but eliminates the feeling of a loss of tension in the line hand.

Because of this, all three of those casts are called "constant tension" casts.

Cheers,
Jim
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Old 04-28-2011, 07:44 PM
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Default Re: Casting weighted streamers

Quote:
Originally Posted by wjc View Post
Mojo,

I think you're confusing yourself.

I do it all the time, especially when calling out fish locations. I actually prefer calling out fish directions as plus 2 oclock and minus 2 o'clock. Minus being to the left. I feel like an idiot when fishing with guide buddies of mine, but it works and they don't beat me up about it too much.

Perhaps it's because the longest a watch has ever lasted me before I broke it was a week or so. My total lifetime of watch-wearing is certainly less than 3 weeks. I can't stand restrictions of any sort. Shoes are bad enough.

The Belgium cast, ellliptical cast and Lefty cast are all basically the same cast, and the rod is generally not "stopped" hard at any clock position, but is decellerated to form a loop and continues in that same general direction until the rod is nearly horizontal usually. The casting stroke makes an ellilpse, changing planes from back to front, rather than remaining in the same plane as with a traditional overhead cast (straight back, straight front in the same plane). This all but eliminates the feeling of a loss of tension in the line hand.

Because of this, all three of those casts are called "constant tension" casts.

Cheers,
Jim
Yea, that's what I meant.
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