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Red Owl 12-04-2011 02:59 PM

Salt Water fly cast
 
I learned the 10 O'Clock to 12 O'Clock way to cast a fly line which is okay on a little trout stream but I see these photos of salt water casters with their arms way back and I have no idea how to make that type of cast- which I assume is done to get more distance. In any event any explanation or sources I can study would help a lot. Thanks.

Jackster 12-04-2011 03:21 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
Generally you lengthen your stroke length as you lengthen your cast.

wjc... come on in here and straighten this guy out. You've lived the trout to salt life and should have some great first-hand advice.

gatortransplant 12-04-2011 03:45 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
In saltwater casting you're going to see a lot more double-hauling. If you watch videos of guys double hauling, you'll often see the casting stroke getting more into the 9 and 3 areas and further.

If you're targeting bonefish, tarpon and the like, double hauling is going to be crucial unless you're a wonder caster. Check it out! Orvis' Pete Kutzer has a great video on double-hauling, it's worth watching.

silver creek 12-04-2011 04:06 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
What you are describing is the "Low Elbow" style of Lefty Kreh. The style you learned is the elbow forward style.

Since Steve Rajeff, one of if not the best caster in the world, uses the elbow forward style, you might do better to improve the style you are using than to learn a new style. I think it is not the style of casting but the mastery of the style that determines the distance you can cast.

"This is the arm style of people who have most influenced casting in California, including Jimmy Green, Mel Krieger and Steve and Tim Rajeff."

Both the Elbow Forward style of Steve Rajeff and the Low Elbow style of Lefty Kreh are described by Al Kyte in Fall 2002 issue of The Loop.

Lefty Kreh claims his style is easier on the body, however, studies have shown this is not the case. There are fewer injuries of the elbow and wrist with the overhead style compared to the sidearm low elbow style.

"A team of researchers is studying the biomechanics of fly-casting at Montana State University, Bozeman (MSU).. Elbow pain was significantly less for the overhead style compared with the elliptical style. Wrist pain was significantly less for those who used the overhead style instead of either the elliptical or sidearm styles."

http://www.working-well.org/articles/pdf/Fishing.pdf

If you want to learn from Lefty, he has a Casting DVD and a book
.

Rip Tide 12-04-2011 04:25 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Red Owl (Post 357810)
I learned the 10 O'Clock to 12 O'Clock way to cast a fly line which is okay on a little trout stream but I see these photos of salt water casters with their arms way back and I have no idea how to make that type of cast- which I assume is done to get more distance. In any event any explanation or sources I can study would help a lot. Thanks.

basically the theory says that the further the rod tip travels during the "speed up and stop" the tighter the loop, and the tighter the loop the less air resistance.
You can read more about it in Ed Jaworowski's book The Cast

---------- Post added at 05:25 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:07 PM ----------

It's a shame that there's no video for Mark Sedotti's Sayonara Sling. He's a casting freak.
You should google him (any hot links would be to other forums). And if he's ever at a club meeting or show near you, go see.

Guest1 12-04-2011 04:30 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
I have a Canadian friend who can cast into the next zipcode, Red Owl. Some of the discussions about his casting may help you with figuring this out, Look in the fly cast for the threads with Amazing Natural Caster. He has the 3 O'clock - 9 O'clock thing down pretty well. There are some good videos on you tube also.

grassonfly 12-04-2011 06:54 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
for saltwater to maximize distance i use a 10 o clock to a 3 oclock so my line is released high and it has more time to travel

Rip Tide 12-05-2011 12:35 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
I don't know if you can make this out, but in this picture my reel is facing toward my right, not to the front. If I were to continue to roll my wrist out and extend my arm back I could reach back all the way toward the dunes for maximum distance.
You want the rod tip to stay on plane pointed toward the sky the whole time, not back to horizontal

http://www.hikingnewengland.com/uplo..._53_725959.jpg

randyflycaster 12-05-2011 12:58 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
I believe Lefty's method is easier for most casters, as it will help prevent your fly from hitting the rod tip. Just make sure your right-foot, assuming you're casting right-handed, is behind your left foot.

Also, if you use a drift move, using Lefty's - rather than lowering the rod to, let's say, 2 o'clock - will help prevent you from adding slack in the line.

To me, one of the big problems with Lefty's method is changing casting trajectories, but that rarely has to be done when casting in saltwater.

Also, when I tried casting Lefty's way I couldn't get my body to fully rotate.

Randy

Rip Tide 12-05-2011 01:09 PM

Re: Salt Water fly cast
 
What Lefty says: (principle #5)

Quote:

For long or more difficult casts, you will need to bring the rod well behind your body on the back cast. In order to do this, you should rotate your casting thumb away from its normal position on top of the rod about 45 degrees away from your body before initiating the back cast, and then take your forearm (never the wrist) straight back 180 degrees from the target


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