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Old 02-03-2010, 10:02 PM
mak mak is offline
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Default Tropical Lines in Coldwater

What is the real impact of using a tropical line w/ mono core in colder temps, say air & water temps in the forties? Mono is a staple line for tackle fisherman in cooler water, so I don't understand why there would be a big difference when mono is used in the core of a fly line.

A particular line I am looking at (tropical w/ mono core) states that it performs best in temps of 70 degrees Fahrenheit but will work in cooler temps; I would like to know what "cooler temps" means. Description below:

Royal Wulff Bermuda Triangle Taper:

"Works best at temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit but can be used at lower temperatures."

Thanks.
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Old 02-04-2010, 09:05 AM
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Default Re: Tropical Lines in Coldwater

Hi Mak,

I missed your first post so welcome to the forum.

Tropical lines are made stiffer than cold water lines due to the heat and warm waters of the tropics. If you take a cold water line to the tropics then it will be like a noodle. Hard to handle and much harder to cast.

If you take a tropic line to cold water you will find it gets extremely stiff. Again making it hard to handle and to cast. So the line companies design their lines for the extremes of tropics or cold water.

The line you are looking at doesn't say it works best at 70 degrees but at temperatures above 70 degrees. If you take that line to cold trout waters it may or may not work well. If you get into the fall or winter months you will find the line performs poorly. During the summer it may work pretty good for you. It all depends on how much colder temperatures and waters you plan on fishing. Its the extremes that that you will notice problems.

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Old 02-04-2010, 09:49 AM
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Default Re: Tropical Lines in Coldwater

The way you can take coiling out of mono is with heat- you know, coily leader, run it through your hands to warm it up a bit and stretch it, and it straightens out. Thing is, you'll have a much harder time doing that through the insulative coating of a fly line.

The other thing is, the mono you're talking about guys using in cold conditions is likely 6-12lb. The break strength of a fly line core is generally 20# or more.

Lastly, fly lines float best when they're straightest. If you picture a coiled fly line trying to float, the vertically higher portions literally are pushing down on the rest of it. This also means that only 20% at best of the line is near the surface, and thus able to take advantage of surface tension in order to maintain flotation.

Moral of the story, you can make a tropic line work in cold conditions, but its going to either cause a lot of extra work, or frustration.
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:51 AM
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Default Re: Tropical Lines in Coldwater

Thaks for the feedback; makes sense.
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