The North American Fly Fishing Forum

The North American Fly Fishing Forum (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/)
-   Fly Lines (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/fly-lines/)
-   -   Camo fly line? (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/fly-lines/307585-camo-fly-line.html)

drc 01-10-2013 05:26 PM

Camo fly line?
 
Has any one used the Rio Grand camp fly line or any other line like it. what are the benefits and risks of a duller colored fly line?

Guest1 01-10-2013 06:16 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
I have had more than one argument over fly line color. Lets look at your statement. It has the word camo in it. The definition of camo is not a color or a style of mixed colors. It is what camoflages you or something else from being seen against a background. In this case your fly line. Almost everyone in my opinion looks at this from the wrong side of the line. If you want it hard for you to see, then go with a dark or stained water color. If you want it harder for the fish to see then go with a color that matches the sky. Light blue or white. A perfect match for most days would be a mixture of light blue and white. Because for the fish, THAT is the background you are camoflaging it against.

However, you can only do so much because the lines are not transparent and will block the light from above and cast a shadow no matter what you do. Also, you have a leader in the 9' or better range that keeps the line away from the fly. Fish are not that smart. That's why they will hit a fly that clearly has a curved pointy addition to it's butt.

The only fly lines I have ever bought that as far as I am concerned come in a camoflage against the background fish see are my Trevor Morgan lines, which are white, and one Rio line which is light blue. If I were to dye the Trevor Morgan line to make it any better than it already was, would be to make 1 foot or so diameter loops with the head and dye one half of the loops in light blue. Breaking up the outline is almost as important as the color is.

I have also lined a ton of fish with an optic orange line and still caught them. The fly is not attached to the line directly so the fish don't see it as connected and even if they did I'm not so sure that some of them wouldn't still hit it.

woodrivertroutbum 01-10-2013 06:33 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
Well said Dan, my thoughts exactly. I have been wanting to take photos of different fly lines from under water facing up. I have a feeling that even a white or blue line is going to look like a darker colored line from below.

Guest1 01-10-2013 06:40 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
Like I said, you can only do so much the lines are not transparent and will block the light from above and cast a shadow no matter what you do. That being said, why make the line hard for you to see? Make it more sporting by making strikes harder to see? Making mends harder to see? I don't think it's a great idea.

woodrivertroutbum 01-10-2013 07:00 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
Somehow I completely missed that paragraph! Sorry about that. I blame on the wife distracting me by trying on her new waders.

Guest1 01-10-2013 07:12 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by woodrivertroutbum (Post 515012)
I blame on the wife distracting me by trying on her new waders.

OK, I need to wash my dirty mind out with soap. :D

brian miville 01-10-2013 07:33 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
Full disclosure: My information on flyfishing for trout is, at the very best, most basic. So I did a little Google-fu and came up with an answer to a simple question I had to start this conversation.....can trout even see color? Answer I found:

"Trout do indeed have color vision, but it is limited to relatively clear, shallow, water and short distances, so at close range, the trout can see the full detail of color."

So from this I can assume that a fly line, being 9' away from the end of the fly tied on the leader, is not going to be very distinct in coloring. So for starters it becomes about shades that would best blend. You would not have to match blue for a blue sky, or white for cloudy or even gray for overcast. As long as you get a shade of grey/white/etc. that comes close to matching what is above you are already at a head start.

I think it is important to point out something Diver Dan said that is very important....trout are "smart", but not THAT smart. Actually I would say less smart and more genetically bred to be very cautious.

I am a hunter. And I see this exactly like hunting deer. With today's hunting supply market you would swear deer are running around the woods with night vision and tri-corders from Star Trek. You will actually see guys get into debates about which camo brand is the best, Mossy Oak vs. Realtree, etc. But the funny thing is that somehow our grandfathers managed to kill deer just as easily without super-fad camo and scent lok this, scent killer that. Since deer are color blind it makes little different anyways. It is, and always has been about, breaking up your outline. This is why you don't wear solid colors. It is something the military knows. I always wondered why they did not, in this age of hi tech cloth printing technology they still clung to the old three tone camo patterns. Well, I found out that 1) cost increases with each additional color added to a pattern, 2) when all you need is three contrasting colors to break up your pattern why spend that extra money for no added benefit? And remember, this is to fool other HUMAN beings, who are much smarter than a deer is. The eye of any living organism is limited by different factors. Even turkeys, who have some of the sharpest vision of any living creature, can not pick out a human in simple "military style" 3 color camo (I know, it is all I wore for many years ;) ). The simple contrasting pattern breaks up an outline effectively.

So this brings us around to fly lines. I would offer up money on a bet that a line using three visible colors (say green, orange and white for example) would work just as well at camouflaging a line than a single color of, say, a light blue or white. And it would have the added benefit of being more visible to an angler. Of course you still have that pesky problem Dan pointed out, and that being the line casting a shadow. For that we will need one of those cloaking devices from the Predator movies. :D

Jackster 01-10-2013 07:34 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by woodrivertroutbum (Post 514996)
Well said Dan, my thoughts exactly. I have been wanting to take photos of different fly lines from under water facing up. I have a feeling that even a white or blue line is going to look like a darker colored line from below.

I'm with you. You should see a silhouette of the line. It should be nothing but contast.
I personally like subdued colors on any line I'm not teaching with. For that I use bright, optic orange lines. I might be wrong but it's not really the line in the water that concerns me as much as the line flashing through the air above the fish where it is more readily seen by the fish.
If you are starting out a brighter line can help you know what the line is doing both when casting and while fishing.
A truly great camo line that I use for false albacore is the Cortland 'Lil Tunny intermediate line. Since it is IN the water it IS seen by fish at their level. It is semi-clear with subtle shades of color in it.

nickj 01-10-2013 09:16 PM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
After decades of fly fishing, and not a few years as a diver/instructor, I've come to the conclusion that the color of the fly line matters only to the fly fisherman.

Rip Tide 01-11-2013 09:57 AM

Re: Camo fly line?
 
It's not how well a fly line matches or contrasts a background that's important. It's about the amount of light that the line reflects.
It's the "flash" overhead that scares the fish
Just sayin'


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:51 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.