The North American Fly Fishing Forum

The North American Fly Fishing Forum (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/)
-   Fly Reels (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/fly-reels/)
-   -   My first Abel question (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/fly-reels/321270-my-first-abel-question.html)

gutterpunk 06-03-2013 01:30 PM

My first Abel question
 
Greetings all.

I recently bought my first Abel, a Super 4, that is the perfect size and feel for my Sage.

I don't remember it being so danged loud in the shop, but that's another story...

It clicks on the intake like normal when I reel easy or have a just a slight amount of inward pressure on the knob, but when I pull out slightly the pawl stops clicking and I just get the low clicking rattle of that pin against the drag plate bearing. Seems like something isn't fitting together tightly enough, but I've checked the lock nut and everything else.

Any thoughts?

audax 06-03-2013 03:34 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
The spool should be in contact with the drag plate at all times, whether the drag setting is light or heavy. Thus, the drag plate turns with the spool when taking in line, whereby the pawls on the perimeter if the drag plate strike the notches and deliver the "in" click. When you have the drag completely backed off or deliberately pull the spool away from the frame, the spool no longer contacts and turns the drag plate against the pawls. In this case, you may hear the pin in the spool clicking against the inboard detents on the face of the drag plate (which is the normal "out" click). I suspect nothing is wrong with the product, rather you're just asking the reel to do something that isn't correct in normal operation.

chi flyfisher 06-03-2013 04:08 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by gutterpunk (Post 561592)
Greetings all.

I recently bought my first Abel, a Super 4, that is the perfect size and feel for my Sage.

I don't remember it being so danged loud in the shop, but that's another story...

It clicks on the intake like normal when I reel easy or have a just a slight amount of inward pressure on the knob, but when I pull out slightly the pawl stops clicking and I just get the low clicking rattle of that pin against the drag plate bearing. Seems like something isn't fitting together tightly enough, but I've checked the lock nut and everything else.

Any thoughts?

It's working exactly as it's supposed to work. The pawl clicks into the groove on the drag plate when line is being pulled out of the spool; therefore, there is no pawl that clicks like a traditional click and pawl reel. The only sound outgoing is from the pin on the spool that goes into the dimples on the drag plate. The sole purpose of that pin and the grooves on the drag plate is to create the outgoing click. Incoming, you have the pawl clicking into the drag plate, which creates a different sound than the pin.

Cheers,
Mike.

von behr 06-03-2013 04:30 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
As stated by others, your Abel is working just as advertised. FYI, when not in use, the drag knob should be backed all the way off. In that position, the pawl may not engage when reeling in. This is normal. The drag will engage when you turn the knob to your desired setting.

By the way, nice choice of reels. The Abel Super 4 is a perfect size for trout fishing.

Enjoy,


-VB :)

gutterpunk 06-03-2013 05:07 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
Thanks, guys. I'm pretty smart in my normal life, but even how the most simple reels work internally can befuddle me. What you're saying mostly makes sense to me--I just couldn't figure out how that slightest lack of pressure, even with the drag turned up, could disengage the pawl.

Thanks, I like the reel a lot.

von behr 06-03-2013 08:07 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
Have you opened it up yet? I would use a penny to remove the small slotted nut on the inside of the drag knob. From there, unscrew the drag knob all the way, and the center spindle can slide right out, thus separating the spool from the frame. Once open, you will see the pawl and how it engages with the machined drag plate.

The pawl clicks in one direction (when reeling in) and locks into the drag plate in the other direction (outgoing line). That's when the cork is at work on the smooth surface at the bottom of your spool and applying the brakes.

If your drag is totally backed off, there's no tension between the spool and the cork, so there's nothing to make that pawl click like you'd want it to. It's just a matter of pressure on the drag plate.

A couple of turns of the drag knob and the pawl will sing to you. Then you know the cork is engaged against the underside of the spool.

It really is a simple, yet well designed, system. If you haven't checked it out, open her up.

In the reverse, use the same penny to tighten that slotted nut at the end, and you're good to go.

Some folks don't like the Abel reels because there are a couple of parts at play when you take them apart. I wouldn't advised removing the spool when you're out fishing, because it could be easy to lose that nut.

There's really no reason to take it apart in the field unless you're changing spools, in which case you should use great care not to drop that nut in the water or in the rocks.

Cheers,

-VB :)

gutterpunk 06-03-2013 09:09 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
Yes, most of the time the first thing I do with a new toy is take it apart to see how it works. I got that tension on the cork made the pawl click, but got 5 when putting 2 and 2 together.

But, thought I've read about everything I can find, any other advice on these reels is appreciated. Thanks again.

sweetandsalt 06-05-2013 10:18 AM

Re: My first Abel question
 
A slight terminology clarification. The term "pawl" indicates the slotted, spring pressured, steel triangular components in an over-run check design of a "spring and pawl" reel...which in turn produces a "click"...as in a traditional Hardy. In the case of a "draw-bar" design like Abel exemplifies, the corresponding spring loaded bits are called "dogs". They (only one is really needed this is back-up redundancy) lock into the teeth around the perimeter of the drag plate to prevent it from counter rotating creating a click and locking it against the coil spring tensioned drag surface against the precisely flat inner surface of the spool. Hence that famous smooth and powerful drag. Draw-bar reels classically produce no out-going click, just the wheeeer of neatsfoot oiled cork against metal. Anglers weaned on spring and pawl and other designs that produce a song as a fish runs missed this sound so Abel designed the spring loaded pin clacking in detentes feature, It is not a functional part of the reel's performance and can be disabled if you do not care for the sound; many old timers don't.

The design history of these reels is traceable to a lineage beginning with the Fin-Nors and Seamasters built in Florida for big game fly fishing back in the 1950's. Abel has refined the design to the point where diminutive trout reels are scalable from the ever successful larger reels...a rarity in fly reel design.

Enjoy your great new reel and keep a coin in the plastic window on your reel case along with your name, cell number and type of line and date mounted so you can remove the lock nut when desired. What color did you get?

FrankB2 06-05-2013 01:56 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
I had a couple of Abel TR reels, and they were definitely more loud when on the rod. The rod is a hollow carbon cylinder, and I suppose that amplifies the sound of the reel. Drove me crazy sometimes, but others love loud clickers.

gutterpunk 06-05-2013 04:52 PM

Re: My first Abel question
 
"Enjoy your great new reel and keep a coin in the plastic window on your reel case along with your name, cell number and type of line and date mounted so you can remove the lock nut when desired. What color did you get?"

Thanks. I got standard black with a standard arbor--I like the looks of a more traditional trout reel. And, while i don't really care about how it looks, it is pretty sharp.

I don't bonefish or steelhead often (couple times a year), but i've been looking at a Super 7 large arbor in pewter for the future. Something about a marine environment that makes me want things that look like stainless steel. Would also be great for flounder (don't laugh), striper, etc. in the mid-Atlantic region.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:01 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.