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Funnel30 02-27-2006 03:55 PM

Which Reel Do You Take?
 
If you were going to be fishing in Alberta and rivers such as the Bow, Crowsnest and mountain streams which reel would you pick and what comments can anyone provide me with.
Orvis CFO III
Sage 2560
I have the Sage right now and haven't used it, it looks amazing and I love the drag system on it, it just doesn't look like it would hold up. I've never touched a CFO but it looks more durable than the Sage. The rod its going to be match with is a Orvis t3 905, or an orvis t3 906. Thanks any input would be greatly appreciated.

Curtis

BigCliff 02-27-2006 04:16 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
Looks to me like you picked out a great reel in that Sage.
http://www.flyfishusa.com/reels/sage-2500-reel.jpg

As long as you don't bang it on too many rocks, it will hold up JUST fine. I would expect it to last longer than a CFO actually. Technology wise, that Sage is pretty much cutting edge, while the CFO design is easily over 30 years old. I'm saying that stuff that old doesn't work, just that many improvements in weight reduction and drag materials have been made in that time.

I'm not sure if I'd take that Sage reel instead of two comparable CFO's, but its close.

Funnel30 02-27-2006 05:01 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
If your choosing a Rod do you go with the 6wt or 5wt or am I even going to notice the difference? Thanks

Fish Bones 02-27-2006 05:50 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
First of all... the Sage is an excellent fly reel. You can't go wrong with that one.

Now... a 5wt or 6wt rod. Hmmm... seems to me that there are a lot of variables here. What size fish do you plan on catching? How far do you need to cast? What is the wind conditions on these waters? What size flies are you trying to cast?

I must say that I have no experience on the Bow or Crowsnest. But I do have a lot of mountain stream experience. Also, I have fished some local waters that are pretty big and hold big fish.

So... I would go with the lightest weight rod that will do the job. If the choices are bewteen a 5 and 6... then I'll take the 5wt. Unless I have to cast larger flies a long distance and I have some considerable wind to contend with. You must be the judge of that. For me... If I can get the fly where I want it, then give me the 5wt.

Yes... you can tell the difference between a 5 and 6wt.

Now... mountain streams. How small of a mountain stream are we talking about? How big, or small, are the fish? If its a typical mountain stream, a 6wt is way too big. I even think the 5wt is too big for a small stream. I use a 2wt on the mountains streams that I fish in Colorado and New Mexico. A 3wt is probably ideal for that type of setting for most anglers.

So... if this is going to be a single rod with multiple uses, an overall rod, the I would go with a 5wt. A better scenario would probably be to get a 3 or 4wt for the mountains streams and 5 or 6wt for the big rivers.

BigCliff 02-27-2006 06:26 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
The exception to what Steve said about mountain streams comes into play when its a rumbling canyon stream with fast turbulent water. If you expect to be fishing these conditions often, then I recommend doing so with nothing lighter than a 4wt. You'll need that heavier line to kick over your fly(s) and split shot, and then the power of a stout rod to steer the fish out of that heavy water. If hoppers are a major trout food up there, you'll find that 5 and 6 weight rods do best at turning those patterns over.

I also seem to recall that there are many lakes up there with good trout fishing. A 6wt rod will often allow you to cast farther than lighter rods would, and will also work better with the full sinking lines that are commonly used in stillwater fishing.

Not saying Steve's wrong, just pointing out some other considerations I thought might come into play in your area.

Fish Bones 02-27-2006 08:37 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
I agree Cliff. Not knowing exactly what his mountain streams are like... it does complicate matters when trying make an accurate rod recommendation.

You're right, If there is any heavy, fast flowing, water you certainly don't want you fish to get in it... especially if he has any size to him. Then, its almost a given that you'll lose him. So, you need the power to keep him out of there. That's true for any size river or stream. Cliff, I think you've just helped me add a new paragraph to my "Perfect Small Stream Fly Rod" article.... thanks.

So, here we are again. What do I mean when I say, small (or mountain) stream? What does someone else mean when they say small stream? So, what is it? Is it a small stream, a spring creek or a narrow river? Perhaps it is a fast flowing and turbulent canyon stream? Are all of these really the same thing? All fly fishers are not on the same page here.

Look up “small stream” in the dictionary. What do you find? Nothing, right? There is no formal definition of this term. I know what I mean when I say “small stream”. But do you see in your mind the same thing that I see? Maybe, maybe not.

When Funnel30 spoke of a "mountain stream" I pictured in my mind a peaceful a small Canadian stream that is one that you can cast across easily just about anywhere on it, that you can wade, often cross in hip boots, and has most of its structure exposed to view. As you suggested, this may not be the type of stream he's referfing to at all. My Colorado streams are never fast flowing when I fish them. If I was trying to fish them in the heart of the runoff then I would likely select a heavier rod. Probably still wouldn't catch very much.

So yes... like I said, it seems to me that there are a lot of variables here. The great folks of this forum will be happy to assist with rod recommendations. But before we can even be close to accurate... we need to know as much about all of the factors you'll be facing. What size fish do you plan on catching? How far do you need to cast? What are the wind conditions on these waters? What size flies are you trying to cast? How can you best describe you mountain streams? etc... For some advice on a small stream rod, you might want to read "The Perfect Small Stream Fly Rod" at: http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/fo...read.php?t=635

Funnel30 02-27-2006 09:40 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
Curtis

Curtis 02-28-2006 12:12 AM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Funnel30
Curtis

HUH?!?

Curtis 02-28-2006 12:13 AM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
Don't be worried about either of those reels. They are both extremely fine tools. The Sage would be better on bigger water as it is a large arbor and will help in those regards. But I love the Orvis CFO. It is actually one of my all time favorite reels.

Funnel30 02-28-2006 04:32 PM

Re: Which Reel Do You Take?
 
Well the 2560 is the reel I have at the moment, it claims to be a 6-7wt reel. Does the reel have to match up to the rod wt? Well bottom line is I shouldn't have let the old man pick out my reel and rod, but when he's generous enough to pay top dollar for gifts who's saying no, so what my plan is going to be is to just go back to the store and pick out what I want and what feels good to me.
This board has been great and I look forward to posting on here any fishing excursions I may be going on in the future. Sorry about that Curtis, I will change my signature to something else so as not to confuse any other members. Well I have one final question and that is in regards to reading material. Not necessarily how to stuff, but more along the lines of fictional work, does anybody have any recommendations? Thanks again.

Funnel30


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