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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-26-2013, 11:27 PM
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Default Re: Bamboo refurbish

The method I describe worked for me. There will probably be a light area where each silk wrap is at because the wood will have darkened from UV exposure. making a template or a list based on measurements is smart but I found that I could see where the guides had been.

Hope all goes well,

Ard
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Old 09-30-2013, 05:00 PM
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Default Re: Bamboo refurbish

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Originally Posted by Hardyreels View Post

How to Impregnate your own rod

Use a length of PVC pipe long enough to fit the sections, 1.5 or 2" diameter will be good.

Cap one end so it will hold fluid.

Wrap the rod sections with wire or strings so you can suspend them in the tube vertically.

Fill the tube with Linseed Oil and hang the sections in the oil for at least 8 hours.

Remove from the oil bath and wipe the sections with a non shedding cloth and hang them vertically in a warm dry room for 2 weeks to cure.

...
This process is commonly called "stabilizing". It's really old school. I have held 1,000 year old oak in my gloved hand that which had been stabilized in basically flax oil (refined linseed oil). Stuff still felt like wood, even after many hundreds of years in the arid soil of SW France.

Adding gentle heat to what Ard described really speeds up the process and gets much deeper penetration into the hollow voids of the cellulose structure.

I have Used PVC pipe as described above to do staves and spear hafts when I was forging. Painted the PVC black and left in ti the sun upright once the ash round and oil were in it. Its a good idea to put a spacer in on the top and don't over fill because the oil will expand when heated. I used to cap the pvc and used sort of a bleeder system to pull a vacuum in the PVC tube.

With oak knife handles, I pretty much "boiled them in oil" with a water bath heating the oil. When the oil reaches temp, all the air floods out the ends, passing through the phloem and xylem which are still in the cellular structure.
It's kind of neat actually.... the ends foam like you would not believe and then the wood sinks.

What stabilized does is replace the air in the cellulose voids with oil. In a sense it never really dries and can take weeks to become dry to the touch.

Tung oil, butcher block oil, and the like can be used as well. One thing I learned with knife handles is that many adhesives don't like linseed oil, especially epoxies.
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Old 09-30-2013, 05:46 PM
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Default Re: Bamboo refurbish

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One thing I learned with knife handles is that many adhesives don't like linseed oil, especially epoxies.
Does this impact attaching the grip and seat? Is it best to use something other than a 2 part epoxy in these cases?
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Old 09-30-2013, 06:12 PM
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Default Re: Bamboo refurbish

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Originally Posted by williamhj View Post
Does this impact attaching the grip and seat? Is it best to use something other than a 2 part epoxy in these cases?
I don't know. Only thing I know about bamboos is the I really like my 6-weight Heddon. Other thing I know is that I believe Ard as well.

Have been looking into this for a project - Will be following what Ard and Petee have put forward here.

I stopped using adhesives, including old school cutler's resin on my knife handles which were fully stabilized and went to riveting or cross drilling/ roll pins / filling with hot pours of pewter.

I also know they use impregnated for a long time and had adhesives that worked with it.

You may want to test out whatever adhesives you are using and oil impregnated or stabilized materials.
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Old 09-30-2013, 07:49 PM
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Default Re: Bamboo refurbish

First off..... Bamboo is not wood. It is a grass. Ok, now that I have that out of my system..... there is no need to impregnate a bamboo rod. It's cool, but not necessary. If you want to impregnate a rod you can also go with a tile sealer. I can get the exact brand several bamboo builders use if you are set on impregnating.

You can pour your finish and it will give you just as good a finish as a dip tube. Or you can hand rub a finish. You can even hand rub on a gorilla glue finish. I am sort of a traditionalist and like Spar Varnish as a finish. But I do have one rod where I have applied 7-10 coat of Min-wax polyurathane hand rubbed finish with Flex Coat applied to the wraps. Hey, had to give it a try in case a customer request a different finish ;-) Looks good and the finish as held up fine.

As for using Philo Bond on the ferrules. Let the solvent evaporate and stick the pieces together. If you mess up and need to redo them, heat will loosen the joint up and you can reposition. Use a two part epoxy and the heat required to remove a mistake can delaminate the strips.

Personal preferences on glues:
Tip tops: high temperature glue stick. Local craft store.
Seats and winding checks: two part epoxy
Ferrules: Philo Bond (contact cement)

Pete
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Old 09-30-2013, 08:16 PM
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Default Re: Bamboo refurbish

Thanks Pete,

Glad to know the impregnation is optional. Am trying to put togeather the stuff I know with the new stuff I am learning. I saw linseed oil and glue/epoxy and cringed.

Sounds like I may have raised an alarm which need not have been raised.

(I knew bamboos is are grasses, the biggest and fastest growing ones. Was thinking that once it was cut and dried, that is just a cellulose structure with a lot of empty space where the cytoplasm used to be.)
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