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mochacon 09-08-2007 09:08 PM

advice for beginner
 
Hi

well, I have been for so long trying to find a hobby and I tried a friends fly rod and thought it would be a great hobby!

I am looking to fish mainly fresh water trout and salmon maybe once in a while. Not sure if I need 2 different rods but I would like to have the one maily for trout but will handle salmon.

I know a few guys and they all have sage. I here its a good name. So I am a strong believer of you get what you pay for.

What is a good rod that I won't grow too fast out of and that will answer all my fishing needs? I have read a bit here and I am thinking a 9' 5wt 4 piece rod?? as for reels I have no clue.

Any takers on setting me up with some sage equipement? would like to be set up with no more then $500.00 if possible for now.

Thank you for your help

OregonStreams 09-08-2007 09:29 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mochacon (Post 14417)
Hi

well, I have been for so long trying to find a hobby and I tried a friends fly rod and thought it would be a great hobby!

I am looking to fish mainly fresh water trout and salmon maybe once in a while. Not sure if I need 2 different rods but I would like to have the one maily for trout but will handle salmon.

I know a few guys and they all have sage. I here its a good name. So I am a strong believer of you get what you pay for.

What is a good rod that I won't grow too fast out of and that will answer all my fishing needs? I have read a bit here and I am thinking a 9' 5wt 4 piece rod?? as for reels I have no clue.

Any takers on setting me up with some sage equipement? would like to be set up with no more then $500.00 if possible for now.

Thank you for your help

Mochacon... Welcome to the sport of fly fishing. You will really need two rods a 4-6wt for trout and an 8wt or so for salmon. So I would start with a trout rod. If you really get into fly fishing Sage makes great rods and Ross/Lampson make great reels, but this does not fit your budget. If I was just starting, I would consider a TFO rod and an Orvis Mid Arbor reel. I see others recommending Echo rods and Okuma reels. You will still need waders, boots, a vest, flies, nippers, plyers, polaroid glasses and other stuff so your $500 will go quickly!

mochacon 09-09-2007 07:34 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
I got in touch with my friend that took up the sport and he is in the same spot as me.

He got a 9 foot 8wt rod for both trout and salmon. Is that wise? What is the difference in the weight? Is it the heavier the stronger? As for the cost, well I was hoping to get set up for 500 but if I have to pay more I will.

OregonStreams 09-09-2007 11:14 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
Mochancon... Rods are designed to bend in response to the weight of the fly line. So an 8wt fly rod is very stiff compared to say a 4wt fly rod. The heavier the line the heavier fly that you can cast and the easier to cast into the wind. On the other extreme, an ultra light 3wt rod allows a more gentle presentation.

The second part of the equation after the cast and presentation is the playing of the fish. The rod stiffness should be matched to the weight of the fish and the strength of the leader. If the rod stiffness is too soft for the fight of the fish, you will exhaust the fish before landing it and decrease the chance of the fish surviving if you release the fish. If the rod is too stiff for the fish, the fish can easily break off the tippet when it "runs" or jumps or you end up using such strong leader that _if_ you catch a fish you end up just hauling the fish straight in which I do find very sporting or particularly enjoyable.

One could fish for steelhead trout or salmon both with an 8wt rod.

hardhat 09-09-2007 11:50 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
There is a good book about the basics of fly fishing. It is called "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Fly Fishing". Please do not be offened by the title as the book has good information for the beginning person.
In time and with experience you will learn that fly fishing is very scientific. The strategies on how to go after fish, how to fish certain streams or lakes, what flys should I use, learning and using different cast, what equipment should I use in this situation, are just a few choices that need some anayltical thought. Sage makes very good equipment but you may like other choices moreso. It is always good to take lessons, visit with a club, or hire a quide for a days fishing. As OregonStreams said, there will be a variety of equipment choices and purchases to to made. The art fly fishing requires also learning some of the science of fly fishing. I have found that learning this science is a very enjoying and never ending process. Have much fun and good luck.

Frank Whiton 09-10-2007 09:10 AM

Re: advice for beginner
 
Hi mochacon,

You don't say what Salmon you might be fishing for. Sockeye and Pink Salmon can be caught with a 6wt. Silvers and Dog Salmon would need an 8wt. For King Salmon you need a 10wt to 12wt. I have caught a couple of Kings on a 6wt but it is no fun. The fish are just too big and the long fight is not good for the Salmon.

For Trout The 3wt to 6wt is a good recommendation. Again it has to do with what size of trout you are fishing. For Alaska or Steelhead an 8wt is called for. A 7wt is considered a good all around rod for big Trout, Steelhead and Bass. I feel that you should match the rod to the primary fish you will be catching. For a Trout rod you might look at a 9' 5wt TFO Professional. For most Salmon and Steelhead take a look at the 9' 8wt TFO TiCr rod. These two rods will cost about $350.

Silver Doc 09-10-2007 09:41 AM

Re: advice for beginner
 
:tongue: WOW! You haven't just found a hobby, you have found what will become an obsession should you stick to it. In the realm of fly rods, reels and sundries and depending on prices will bring you to your senses. If the "craziness" continues then you are in for a treat. Begin by reading about rods, reels and the atatchments. Become familiar with what you will be using. Money and a wife and family ar factors to consider also. So you are ready to begin one of the finest sports in the world and one that will give you much pleasure, frustration and loss of temper. There's a plethora of books as well as CD's that you can read and watch. Go to your local fly shop or fly fih sites and have them suggest them. Practice, practice and mor practice casting and tying knots. Check locally what hatches are in the air. It's a whole new world you're getting into. The books that I found useful: Presenting The Fly by L. Kreh any of the Orvis books and the L.L.Bean books. The CD's by Joan Wulff and Mel Kreiger on casting. Then get your own den and build a bookcase, a tying desk a storage area for rods and other equipment. Also if you are married, a good divorce lawyer. Seriously your wife or significant other may become intereste as well as the kids, if any. You have opened Pandora's box. Enjoy, stick with it it's great. :frogdance Frank

BigCliff 09-10-2007 12:30 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
Welcome to the group! You've already gotten good advice on rods. I second the recommendations of TFO and ECHO rods. For reels, good choices would be a Cortland endurance, or one of the Lamson Radius reels i saw marked way down on this site the other day- Sierra Trading Post - Save 35-70% on Famous Name Brands

mochacon 09-10-2007 06:09 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
Thanks

I have alot to consider here. I hope that I do like as much as you guys do. I work 4 days on and 4 off so I am bored stiff with nothing to do. I am already divorced so that is not a worry lol...

I am going to check out those books and I was speaking to a friend of mine and his dad has been fishing for 30 some years and now has a business selling gear.


As for the type of fish well that is a good question. I am thinking trout and salmon but what kind lol... have no clue. I am from the maritimes in canada if that helps. I have heard about rainbow trout and I think its pink salmon around here.

thanks again

Frank Whiton 09-10-2007 06:34 PM

Re: advice for beginner
 
mochacon,

Rainbows and Pink Salmon are both easy to catch on a fly rod. These would be good fish to target living in the North Country.


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