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Old 09-01-2009, 05:37 PM
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Default fly line weight

first,I apologize if this is in the wrong section,,I just recieved a old shakespeare wonderod (Ialways liked these old rods)that I purchased on ebay,my question is on the line weight/design,its marked EEE, ive searched my info and I assume this is a 5wt,but I was wondering as to what style (wt forward,sinking etc)this would be.I dont see any info on this other than the middle letter indicates weight.any help would be appreciated,thanks!
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Old 09-01-2009, 05:55 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

Never had a triple E but the rod is glass and likely to be a tad on the slow action side. Any line will work but I would pick up a nice white DT to complement the rod. The rod is white isn't it?
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Old 09-01-2009, 06:25 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

Jack, welcome to the forum-- glad you found us.

Yup, the rod is a 5 weight-- the EEE refers to an old designation for level fly lines, (often simply labelled as "E") these were the least expensive lines back in the day and were not as friendly in terms of performance as tapered lines- hard to find now-a-days, and you'd likely get better performance out of a modern tapered 5 weight line even if you could find a new level one (and much better than an old level one). If you got old line or paperwork with it labelled HEH (the old designation for a 5 wt double taper) or HEG (5 wt weight forward taper) they would also go with that rod although they'd probably be pretty beat up by now

I'd go with Ard's suggestion with a modern 5 weight double taper line-- unless you were going to throw big bass poppers with it in which case a weight forward might be a tad better (?). Either way, you'd probably get the most use out of a floating line.

Again welcome to the forum, hope you keep popping in- we're a friendly bunch and it's always good to see new folks here.

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Old 09-01-2009, 06:51 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

thanks! thats what I was looking for,never could find what a "e" designation was.I do have some 5wt lines in good shape i was needing to find a home for (not white though,LOL).Might even be a good place for that new in box monkey wards automatic reel i have,at least to practice with.(never did like fishing with one)I still use my old spinning wonder rods ive had for years ,and their still good,tough old rods.thanks again!
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Old 09-01-2009, 08:14 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

Jack,

Check out this website. You'll learn a lot about Shakespeare fiberglass fly rods, the line weights they were designed for and and their uses.

http://fiberglass-fly-rods.pbworks.com/Shakespeare

One of the things that you'll learn is that Shakespeare was pretty precise with the dating of their products. The "EEE" designation that you see on your rods is actually a date; it's not a line weight. Here's how it works.

Shakespeare fiberglass rods were all made in the 20th century, so they assumed that the date on all of their rods would start with "19". Once there, they then narrowed it down in steps. The first "E" represents a "6", as does the second one. So, your rod was manufactured in 1966. The third "E" is for the month in which the rod was manufactured; in this case June. Your "EEE" designation means that your rod was manufactured in June, 1966; making it a very nice vintage glass rod; as the '60's the '70's were the heydays of fiberglass rodmaking in the US.

Now, to find the line weight for the rod, you'll need to look just above the cork on your rod blank and see if you can find a rod designation (or go to the ebay selling notice and see if they give you the rod designation; they usually do). If you find a designation, then cross check it against the line weight codes in the link above. It will give you the line weight that the rod was originally designed to take. Many of the rods in the 7'0"-8'6" category were actually designed for a what they used to call a "level" line; meaning that there was no taper in the line at all. The closest approximation to this today is the double taper line, so Ard's recommendation on a "DT" line is a good one.

If you can't find a designation on the rod, then send me a picture of it; along with a short description and I'll see if I can get the line weight answer for you. If all else fails, then I think that a DT6 would be a safe place to start.

I have several vintage glass Shakespeare Wonderods; which I fish frequently. I like some of them a lot!

Pocono
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Old 09-01-2009, 11:11 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

Try a 4,5,6,7 weight line on and then decide which line fits the bill. You'll be surprised at what that rod is capable of. I'll guarantee it's more than one weight.
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Old 09-02-2009, 09:29 AM
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Default Re: fly line weight

Hi Everyone,

Isn't it amazing how different people think differently about the same rod. I had one of the white colored glass Wonder rods that I bought in the sixties. It was such a noodle rod that I fished it one time and never used it again. I finally tossed it in the garbage. It was a full flex rod and to me it was terrible to cast with.

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Old 09-02-2009, 09:36 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

If the model number is not on the rod (on the glass blank) then check the reel seat. On the 1270T Wonderod I have the model is stamped into the upper catch/clip that grips the reelfoot on the reelseat. You can then check the page that Pocono gave the link for under the models section. Don`t be surprised if it is designated for what seems like an odd number of line weights. The model I have is designated for DT6F,DT7S,WF8F,WF9S, L7F. For me it casts terribly with the DT6F (too light), WF8F is ok ( a little heavy) , and then someone on Fiberglass FlyRodders suggested trying DT7F. It is casts great with this line and is fast becoming my favorite rod for local rivers/creeks for smallmouth,panfish, and the yet to be caught carp.

http://fiberglassflyrodders.yuku.com/directory

Brian
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Old 09-09-2009, 09:16 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

well,

I guess i am changing the subject slightly but it falls into the same title.

I am looking into buying a short( 6 foot ) rod for small mountain stream.Since the stream i will be fishing in are narrow and leaves very little room for casting I want to get a tiny 1 or 2 weight. At the most I will have to cast at 15 feet away from where I would be located on the bank or in the brook.

If my leader is 9 feet long, this mean that my floating line will be out only 6 feet. I am affraid that this will not be enough line to actually be able to do some precise landing of my fly.

Would that make sense to have a heavier line than I would normally use. In other words if i use a 3 line on a 1 onz rod would that give me a better weight to send my fly where i want? Is this cheating?

Also having limited amount of space would a stiffer rod would be better? I am usually using a 5 weight that is very soft that i love but I think that a stiffer short and light rod would have to be stiff in order to be able to reach 15 to 20 feet in confine area

Thanks in advance for your help


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Old 09-09-2009, 09:32 PM
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Default Re: fly line weight

I fish a lot of small streams. But, I'm usually casting 25-40 feet, because I fish on the angle; roughly 45 degrees up from where I'm standing (sometimes at the same angle but fishing downsteam, if I'm fishing soft hackles). I use 3 wt. rods in this situation and they perform just fine for me.

I would not go to a stiff rod (fast action) for small stream fishing, since you don't need the extra horsepower to reach your target; you need a good, precise presentation that will get the fly where you think it will be most effective. A good medium action rod will do that for you.

Just FYI - my 3 wts. are: 1. Diamondback 7'6" glass (still my favorite 3 wt.), 2. Sage 7'6" ZXL graphite (Neversink has seen this rod in action on a very small stream in Japan to fish for "Yamame' a very small trout variety - it worked very well) and 3. Tom Morgan 7'9" graphite (my newest 3 wt. and a real pleasure to cast).

Last edited by Pocono; 09-09-2009 at 09:34 PM. Reason: misspellings
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