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Old 11-10-2009, 08:25 PM
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Default Looking for Midge Options

I currently carry griffths gnat for my midge use but often have problems seeing it. I was wondering if there was any good alternatives (such as a parachute black gnat) which would be easier to see?
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Old 11-10-2009, 08:43 PM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

You may also want to try brown, dun, or black Bivisibles, or fore-and-aft (knotted) midges
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Old 11-10-2009, 09:08 PM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

A couple of midge adult patterns that I use on a regular basis are called the Cripple Thor and a variation called a smoke jumper. They are tied commercially by Yellowstone Fly Goods out of Billings Montana www.yellowstoneflygoods.com.
They are both very productive and pretty easy to see for a small dry fly. They both are made with a CDC wing so using the right floatant/desiccant makes a huge difference.

Another very good midge pattern comes from Solitude Fly Company (www.solitudefly.com/flies.aspx) and it is called a hanging midge. I prefer the grey one but the black works well also. This fly also has CDC for a wing so floatant selection is crucial.

For floatant you can use either Frog's Fanny or other powder desiccants. They work OK but you have to keep applying the stuff to keep keep them floating and sooner or later one will come open in your vest and make a mess. I prefer to use a liquid floatant that I make myself. It works really well on CDC and other flies that you need to float high. To make the floatant you will need 4 oz of Charcoal lighter fluid and one puck of Mucilin Silicon floatant, it has a green label, the traditional mucilin has a red label. Put the puck of mucilin in the lighter fluid and let it soak for at least 24 hours. It takes a while for the lighter fluid to break down the mucilin but it will in a day or two. If you want to speed up the process you can boil some water and remove it from direct heat. Once the hot water is away from any open flame or a heat source put the mucilin and lighter fluid in a water tight container and then into the hot water. It takes about 15 minutes for the mucilin to dissolve. The best containers I have found for the floatant are made by Nalgene. I get them at our local back packing store, who sells them for carrying small amounts of things such as soap, spices or whatever else you need. They are great containers that are water tight and as long as you tighten the top they don't leak the floatant either.

This floatant used to be sold by Orvis but with tight restrictions on shipping they are not able to ship it anymore. Give it a try, you will be amazed at how well it will make a CDC or other dry fly float. I used to cuss and refused to use CDC patterns because they only floated for a short time and once you caught a fish it was like pulling teeth to get it to float again. The liquid floatant will float a CDC fly for a good 10 minutes and once you catch a fish just dip the fly in the floatant and make a few false cast, it will float high again. The floatant cleans the fly as well as coats it so you can take an old dirty fly and make it like new. Good luck with your midge fishing and if you smoke stogies or butts be sure and use some caution with the floatant.
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Old 11-11-2009, 12:32 AM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

When I fish small midges, I can usually see them clearly to around 25 feet.
That depends on whether I'm wading, and how deep the water is as well.
You should have a pretty good idea of where your fly landed, and track it
during its drift. If I loose sight of the fly, but see a rise within where my
fly should be, I set the hook. I know some people use a larger fly or indicator,
and tie the midge on as a dropper. I've done that as well, and it works ok.
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Old 11-16-2009, 06:44 PM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

I agree with Frankb2

I usually use a #16 or #14 Giffets or Hopper as the first fly and then add in the #22 Dry that I can't see past 10'.

When the first fly moves or stops or a fish bumps near it, I set. It works well with the little dry's you can't see. Plussssssss sometimes they even hit the first fly.

I have had several top water hits where the fish will move up to the first fly change his mind and then hit the second fly.

I feel para fly's sometimes mess with the natural look if the hook size is 20 or smaller. I have had a case where my Para Beatle landed upside down on the water thus no fish would think of hitting that beatle.

good luck.. fishing doubles takes time and has steps of frustration but once learned you will rarely fish singles again.

Critter
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Old 11-17-2009, 12:48 PM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

For better to find the fly on the water. Add a Clear Antron loop on the top over the hackle. ( It will also help the fish to find your fly - a trigger)

Click the image to open in full size.

Trygve
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Old 11-17-2009, 06:26 PM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

Nice Idea!!!
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Old 11-18-2009, 07:57 AM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

In flat water, with correct lighting conditions you can grease your leader and tippet up to 6-12" of the fly to detect strikes.

If conditions are not right for the greased leader technique, try putting a small pinch of "Strike Putty" on the tippet knot, or tie a small wisp of yarn in your knot and apply floatant to it. This allows you to easily spot the tippet, and most times you are able to follow the line down to spot the fly. Even if you cannot see you fly, with any movement of the SP or yarn, you just tighten up to hook the fish.

Will this spook fish?.. not really, many times the strike indicator gets bit instread of the fly! I find striking with any rise near where you think your fly is will spook a lot more fish.

An added benefit to this rig is it allows you to monitor the drift better by watching how both the tippet and the fly drift.

With an extra long tippet you can put the SP closer to the fly, maybe 24" or so.

I fish midges all the time in some tough PA streams and this technique really works well for me. Good luck.
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Old 11-21-2009, 11:37 AM
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Default Re: Looking for Midge Options

I like the idea of using strike putty. My fear at first was that it would interfere with the drift but I realized in a small amount it would make no difference.
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