The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > General Fly Fishing Discussion > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussions regarding fly fishing as a whole. Ask questions. Get answers...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2009, 12:05 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: bend, or
Posts: 22
soyavenger is on a distinguished road
Default tapered fly line and their intended uses

im guessing that each style of taper has a specific purpose, and im also guessing that it has to do with wind and desired cast distance. correct me if im wrong, but...

the gradual taper thats thickest in the middle would be for long casts on calm days?

lines that are weighted more on the leader end are best for windy conditions?

are there advantages to untapered lines?

ive seen in catalogs that theyre pretty specific, with diagrams as to where the taper begins, where the thickest section is, and where the taper ends. they seem pretty specialized for different conditions and even different species.
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2009, 04:22 PM
Hardyreels's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
Posts: 11,689
Blog Entries: 70
Hardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond repute
Send a message via Yahoo to Hardyreels Send a message via Skype™ to Hardyreels
Default Re: tapered fly line and their intended uses

If you 'google' fly lines you will be able to find diagrams and explanations that are far more detailed than I would attempt to explain in text here.

The only line I own that is not a double taper is a spey line having multiple heads. For general fly fishing with every rod I own from 3wt to 9wt I use double taper lines. Of course this is my choice based on experience with various tapers, others will disagree perhaps but they (DT lines) are a good foundation for beginners and advanced anglers alike.

I choose to deal with cross wind conditions by adjusting my casting loop to a very tight (or narrow) loop between the running and outgoing line during a cast. Illustrations of the open and tight loop are also a click away on your computer. Line speed, timing, and power added to the cast will fare better in the wind than a wind cutter type line that is handled poorly.

Hope that gets the discussion started.

Good topic,

Ard
__________________
Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard

The Alaska Fishing & Outdoors Blog;
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2009, 10:48 PM
Kerry Pitt's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Beaumont, Alberta
Posts: 722
Blog Entries: 10
Kerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud ofKerry Pitt has much to be proud of
Default Re: tapered fly line and their intended uses

Because I cast poorly no matter what I use, I will add this bit of useless trivia.
The double taper was developed because of silk lines. The lines took a bit of maintenance, to clean and dress. Then after a part day the one end would waterlog. The line could be removed and reversed so the fly fisher had another half day of casting. The double taper gave the fly fisher the same taper on both ends.
Personally I find that if you cast well, it doesn't matter what line you use. If you don't, it doesn't matter what line you use.
__________________
Each smallest act of kindness - even just words of hope when they are needed, the remembrance of a birthday, a compliment that engenders a smile - reverberates across great distances and spans of time, affecting lives unknown to the one whose generous spirit was the source of this good echo, because kindness is passed on and grows each time it's passed, until a simple courtesy becomes an act of selfless courage years later and far away.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2009, 11:18 PM
MoscaPescador's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 3,727
Blog Entries: 4
MoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: tapered fly line and their intended uses

Quote:
Originally Posted by soyavenger View Post
im guessing that each style of taper has a specific purpose, and im also guessing that it has to do with wind and desired cast distance. correct me if im wrong, but...
I believe that the correct word that you are looking for is "application." Wind and distance can be a factor. Also consider the sizes of the flies being cast along with the line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soyavenger View Post
the gradual taper thats thickest in the middle would be for long casts on calm days?
From this description, it sounds like you are referring to a double taper line. People like this type for a few reasons. First it roll casts nicely because the belly is consistently weighted. Second it is really good for line control (mending). Lastly if the front end wears down, the line can be flipped around. The back end is now the front end. I actually like this for lighter weight creeking rods in which distance isn't an issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soyavenger View Post
lines that are weighted more on the leader end are best for windy conditions?
This sounds like a weight forward design. If you are shooting a lot of line, it is better in the wind. All the mass is concentrated in the head. It pulls the thinner running line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soyavenger View Post
are there advantages to untapered lines?
None that I know of. Some might chimb in on this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soyavenger View Post
ive seen in catalogs that theyre pretty specific, with diagrams as to where the taper begins, where the thickest section is, and where the taper ends. they seem pretty specialized for different conditions and even different species.
This is why I brought up the term "application." Some lines are designed to present a small fly very gently. These lines usually have long narrow front tapers. Other fly lines are designed to turn over indo-bobbers, weight, and multiple flies. These lines usually have heavy front sections. Some lines are designed to turn over big poppers. These lines have a heavy front section with plenty of mass behind the head.

Don't get carried away on trying to understand all the tapers. You will probably end up pulling all your hair out.

MP
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2009, 04:12 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 23
jackinok will become famous soon enough
Default Re: tapered fly line and their intended uses

I'll chime in on this one.the untapered (level) lines have thier uses also,they have some very good advantages in certain aplications.first they will load a rod faster than any other,which makes fishing in close quarters far easier.They are easier (in my opinion) to mend also.since the whole line drifts in a current at a even rate. They float better,(maybe)since the tips are not a smaller size,(this of course would be an old line, most new lines float very well).I use a level line all the time bass fishing,in my opinion it makes casting large flies on a short line easiest of all.Lots of people here use a bass tapered line which is basically a wt forward line with a short taper which would load a rod in the same way basically. Were living in the age of specialty tapers ,so the old level lines get a bad,somewhat undeserved rap in my opinion.they have their place just like any other.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tapered leader corefly General Fly Tying Discussions 5 07-03-2009 12:57 AM
Tapered leader question spassky72 General Discussion 9 12-14-2008 03:48 PM
Why is leader tapered? jbu311 General Discussion 5 05-15-2008 07:03 AM
Tippet vs. Tapered Leader wolfcry General Discussion 5 03-14-2008 05:23 PM













All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.