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j43jacko 04-03-2011 04:05 PM

Beginner nymphing?
 
What way would be the easiest for me to learn how to nymph? Using an indicator or just putting on a split shot and casting upstream and detecting the strike by feel?

mcnerney 04-03-2011 05:48 PM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by j43jacko (Post 235343)
What way would be the easiest for me to learn how to nymph? Using an indicator or just putting on a split shot and casting upstream and detecting the strike by feel?

I think it would be much easier for you to first start with an indicator. Here is a basic setup: On the leader (say 9ft 4x), attach some sort of indicator (the thingamabobber is real popular, I like white, and shy away from the bright colors on pressured water) to the leader (positioned 1 1/2 to 2 times the water depth). At the bottom of the leader attach a piece of 5x tippet to the leader (I like the double surgeons knot) and at the bottom of the tippet attach your first nymph. About 8-12 inches above the first fly attach a small weight. Using a Clinch Knot or improved Clinch Knot attach a second piece of 5x tippet to the hook bend of the first fly, then at the far end tie on the second fly. Your leader and tippet sizes are going to be dependant on the depth of water you fish, how big the fish are and how much fishing pressure those fish see daily. As you move around in the stream you will want to constantly check the indicator to be sure you are at 1 1/2 to 2 times the water depth and how much weight you are using. Slow water, smaller amounts of weight and faster water will require adding more weight.
Here are a few videos to get you started.
The North American Fly Fishing Forum - Nymphing Setup-Double Nymphs-How To





If you are interested in more videos, just do a search on YouTube.

Larry

al_a 04-03-2011 07:02 PM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
Having gone through the beginner stage of nymphing about 15 years ago when I first started fly fishing seriously, I'd say Larry's advice is perfect. Only thing I do differently is in the rigging...

At the end of your leader, tie on a single length of tippet (I usually go with 3X or 4X fluorocarbon) that is about 24 inches long, using the double surgeon's knot. Pick out a top nymph, which will usually be a little bigger than your bottom nymph, and tie it onto the tippet with a PALOMAR knot, so that it ends up about 6-8 inches below the knot connecting tippet to leader, and leaving the long tag end that you'll have with a palomar knot. At the end of that long tag end of your tippet, tie on your other fly. Put a split shot just ABOVE the knot attaching tippet to leader. That knot will keep the split shot from sliding down the line as it inevitably loosens a bit. Other than that, the only difference between my set-up and what Larry recommended is that the line will come off the eye of the first nymph, instead of the bend of the hook (which in my experience doesn't matter much), but it means you have one less knot to tie, and with cold hands or low light the fewer knots you have to tie, the better!

Best place to learn nymphing is in fairly fast-moving water 2-4 feet deep. Put on enough weight to have your split shot just ticking the bottom once it gets down--you'll see your indicator vibrating or bobbing just a bit. Mending your line to keep it from "pulling" on your indicator is one of the most important things to learn, and detecting strikes is the other...anytime your indicator does something different--pauses, bobs a little bit more than normal bottom ticking, moves sideways, or suddenly disappears, set the hook.

HuronRiverDan 04-04-2011 07:32 AM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by j43jacko (Post 235343)
What way would be the easiest for me to learn how to nymph? Using an indicator or just putting on a split shot and casting upstream and detecting the strike by feel?

Jacko, The advice you got from Larry and Al was great advice; you tube and other sources are also your friend. Check at your local library and see what kind if fly fishing videos they have available. My advice is to learn both types; different conditions call for different tactics. If you're nymphing a stretch of water with a lot of snags don't hesitate to change the way you have your indicator rigged; you can rig up so your fly or flies are running just above bottom. Don't be afraid to try different rigging techniques.

Dan

Bigfly 04-05-2011 10:53 AM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
These guys are on it, as usual.
A couple things I'd add, though.
You will get good at guessing depth after a while.
Until then, rig shallow first, then you won't lose everything on the first drift.
It is a killer to lose it all, and then re-rig.
Raise indy about 6" at a time.
The game is to guess which you need, more weight, or more depth.
You will lose a few flies doing this. We say on the Truckee, "if you're not losing flies, you're not fishing".
This will take some practice, but there is hope.
Perfect this style, and fatties await.
Good luck.

Jim

goofnoff2 04-05-2011 10:59 AM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
Dame Juliana said that when fisning with a single hair line never use a cork bigger than a pea.

Indicators have been around for awhile.

bigspencer 04-05-2011 11:25 AM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
$.01,
IME...don't be afraid to go with the lightest reasonable diam. tippet = 5x for example. True, you might get hung on botton obstacles a little more, but the lighter tippet will give your imitation a more natural drift and will produce more and bigger fish. 5x is strong stuff...unless you're going over #12 patterns, 5x might lose you a few more flies, but will produce more shows...IME.
*One thing...imho, make the section above your tippet over 8" and your tippet over 12". Both sections will produce more stretch than will very short sections, thus you won't break as many fish off. I know it'll seem a little more nuisance with a long leader but it'll give the two thinnest sections some room to stretch. The rest of the leader doesn't have to be that long = its burliness won't be as apt to break..

$.01

diamond rush 04-05-2011 02:34 PM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
In case you didn't see it, there's a great discussion on indicators going on at: This Thread

oregonism 04-05-2011 02:44 PM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
One thing I didn't realize that was sort of an "Aha!" moment last time I was out, was to have my indicator downstream of my nymph. I've only been out about ten times fishing with an indy, and this was the first time this really set in. Once I figured this out, I started hooking fish a lot more often, and strikes were more apparent. I don't remember ever being told to do that from the person that taught me, and all the times I've seen indicator diagrams, it just never sunk in.

Also, I recently read to just pull the slack out of the line to set the hook, pretty gently. I've missed plenty of fish from tensing up and setting the hook like I'm setting it against a largemouth, and I am eager to get out and try the gentler method and see if I can hook up more fish. I posted a thread from one of my last outings regarding my meager nibble-to-fish-hooked ratio.

diamond rush 04-05-2011 07:07 PM

Re: Beginner nymphing?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by oregonism (Post 236416)
Also, I recently read to just pull the slack out of the line to set the hook, pretty gently. I've missed plenty of fish from tensing up and setting the hook like I'm setting it against a largemouth, and I am eager to get out and try the gentler method and see if I can hook up more fish. I posted a thread from one of my last outings regarding my meager nibble-to-fish-hooked ratio.

Of course you want to set the hook relatively gently, but oftentimes a poor hooked/nibble ratio can indicate that you're close to figuring out what the trout want. Trout will more aggressively hit things that more closely match what they're feeding on at the moment. So if you get several bites but no hook-ups, make a small adjustment in size, color, or presentation and see if you can't figure them out.

PS: Can I use the term "hooked/nibble ratio"? Its a great concept! :)


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