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Old 04-16-2011, 08:04 PM
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Default are float tubes worth it??

I have been debating buying a float tube to fly fish some remote waters. These are cold lakes. Can anyone tell me of their experiences, successes,
pros and cons of tube fishing...
Thanks
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Old 04-16-2011, 09:11 PM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

Tubes you need waders, fins and a pfd.
Pretty much same with a kickboat.
I prefer kickboats.
Are you hiking in or driving in?
Cons- what are you comparing it to? If wading or casting from shore, there is no cons.
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Old 04-16-2011, 09:58 PM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

I seldom use my tube anymore since I got the canoe.
But I can't backpack my canoe....
Tubes are low overhead/low maintenece.
I can take more stuff in the canoe and I don't have to sit in the water.
I sit higher in the canoe so casting is easier and I can see better.
The fish can see and hear me better in the canoe.
It takes 10 min to air up the tube and toss it in the back of the truck. It takes me 40 min to load the canoe and associated gear into the truck. It takes 5 min to get into the tube and into the water. Probably takes 20 plus to launch the canoe.
Pretty much like anything else, there are trade offs.
But as above- no comparison between being on the water and on the bank to fish.
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Old 04-16-2011, 10:17 PM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

To answer the question in your title. Absolutely. You can cover a lot more water. More importantly you can get to shelfs; trenchs where the fish are hanging.
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Old 04-17-2011, 07:15 AM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

Well thanks guys, those comments are pretty much what I expected, but the float tube ads seemed to good too be true. For the heavy fish and/or big water I have a 1974 Silverline Antigua 18T with 188Hp mercruiser it is a big wide deep boat, set up for trolling and going deep with a down rigger. Then I have a 10 ft. portaboat - one of the old originals, unlike the new ones , this one was made in Canada, it is also probably a collectors item but it floats without leaks and a lot more stable than a canoe, plus I can put a small motor on it.
I am beginning to get the knack of tying flies, they are beginning to look like flies but a terrible time getting hackles on right. I would love to watch someone tie for a while and learn some tricks. Keeping wings straight is another problem.
A fly fishing plus! = NO BACKLASHES!!!!!
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Old 04-17-2011, 07:28 AM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

Mmm...float tubes. I like them for the fact that you don't have to haul it around with a trailer or on your roof, you can setup at the lake in 5 mins and be on the water in no time, they're light, user friendly, give ya exercise, and you can get pretty much anywhere.

Some helpful tips. Don't buy waders with a seam along the inside of the thigh if at all possible. I had a pair of Cabelas' waders that wore on the seam and allowed lots of icy fresh waders into the gonadial region. lol. Not so much fun.

Secondly, don't cheap out on the flippers. This is your primarily means of propulsion and can put a lot of strain on your ankles. I'm a Force Fin guy all the way and I won't switch for anything. Can turn on a dime with no effort, and can even fight current in rivers with just a simple steady rhythm. (yes I go everywhere with my tubes, lol)

Lastly, get the Outcast style tube with either the inflatible seat or foam seat. They're by far the best on the market. I've tried a few other brands and they aren't even close. I actually use the trout unlimited togiak for backpacking into lakes though because it weighs about a third less than my fishcat. So other than that, get an Outcast!

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Old 04-17-2011, 08:38 PM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

I've had a lot of tubes. This one eats them all for lunch. But it's pricey.
davescadden2010catalog



The Escape is 24 lb. Capacity is 500 lb. You can put a motor on it. And it has oars. It all depends on what you want to spend.
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Old 04-18-2011, 08:32 AM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

There are a few threads on tubes on this forum, do a search and you can see the pros and cons pretty easily. I had a pontoon boat, and if you have a truck, they are pretty good, I have a jeep wrangler, the pontoon for me required a trailer. I have had a few float tubes, donut, u-boat and now a Vshaped cumberland. Vshaped are in my opinon the best of the three, and the cumberland has a foam seat that keeps all but your feet and legs out of the water which is nice especially if the water is cold (im ~200 lbs and it works great), deflates and fits in the back of my wrangler and costs about $200. I, like you, have a boat to use if I decide I want to use a motor but I find I generally take the tube to the local lakes - 5 minute setup, no hassle at the ramp, drive up, pump it up with the little rechargeable pump, waders, flippers, PFD, and kick to the fish. My funds are limited, if I could I would probably have the scadden - Joni and Mojo fish a lot of stillwater and rivers and they fish hard - if they recommend a product, I would bet it is a good product.

So to answer your original question - are float tubes worth it, the answer, in my opinion, is yes.

d
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:21 AM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanglefoot View Post
I have been debating buying a float tube to fly fish some remote waters. These are cold lakes. Can anyone tell me of their experiences, successes,
pros and cons of tube fishing...
Thanks
ABSOLUTELY!!!!! Nothing beats getting out ON a lake. I started out with a Caddis donut. I have since progressed and now own the ultimate in my opinion, but you really need to start somewhere to KNOW what to look for in the future. I still see old timers in donuts. Not my choice anymore, but they do work.

They are easy to pack, but here are two pros and cons. First, material. Most donuts (good ones) are made of CAR tubes. They are heavier but can be inflated with a bike pump. Next the OUTER material. Nylon, double stitched..... I have seen allot of cheaper covers split no mater how beautiful the seams are. That is like a Ball Park Frank when that happens. Any bladder is fine if it is encased in a GOOD cover.
Most the Doughnut tubes I looked at were 10 to 12 lbs. So with that, understand they make U or V tubes in the 6lb range, and the Escape was at 24 lb is now I hear at 20 lb.

I disagree that flippers are a main issue specially with a doughnut. Any flipper will work fine, but if you tube allot and experience rough water, then the bigger the fin the better and I will add, for me, the stiffer the material for really rough water.
I have Omega's...long and awesome. They are one fin you can actually move on both the up and down stroke just by leaning back and fluttering your feet like a swimmer. They require very little movement to propel you.
But, I also have Force Fins which are a harder/stiffer rubber. They are shaped like a scoop. I prefer them on the big waves to hunker down and scoop my way to shore. BUT, I wear a woman's 9. I have allot of my FF showing so a big blade. Hubby wears a 12/13 and there is ver little fin showing with his foot.
Again, in my opinion, not an issue with a donut, but on a pontoon where you are sitting higher out of the water, a longer fin is a must.
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