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Old 05-19-2010, 02:30 PM
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Question New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Hello,

I just recently started fly fishing. I have been using a friends rod and i am looking to purchase my own. However, i am not sure what to buy.
What i was thinking, from the few rods i've used, and from reading online is that i want these things for a general purpose rod.
5-6 weight
9ft
3-4 pieces
medium-fast action
double tapered line
I've read that cork drag is better but i am not sure if i would even be able to tell at my skill level. Same goes for large arbor size.


So i have a few questions i was hoping toget some help with.
1, Should i buy a package to start off with or is it better to build your own.
- what about this package? Temple Fork Outfitters™ Lefty Kreh Pro Series Fly Rods/ Hobbs Creek™ Large Arbor Fly Reel Outfit

2, If i were to build one, what would you recommend?
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Old 05-19-2010, 02:52 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Hey Tampac welcome to the forum.

Having a friend that already fly fishes will be a big help in getting you started.

What kind of fish will you be chasing?

What types of water (big western rivers, small brushy streams a little of everything)

There are a number of great values out there, including TFO, Redington, Echo and many others.

A 9' 5 weight is a great all around trout rod, but may not be the best choice if you fish for bass.

A four piece rod is great if you'll be flying with it because you can store it in overhead compartment on most airlines instead of having to check it.

medium fast action will be a bit more forgiving than a fast action rod and will be a bit easier to learn on

I would go with a floating weight forward line instead of a double taper

There are many types of drags, a reel with an adjustable disc drag of cork or synthetic would be generally be preferable to a reel with a simple "click and pawl" drag, but even an inexpensive click and pawl would be fine for most types of fishing. For most fish in freshwater, in terms of priorities as far as bucks go, put your money into the rod and line, and if you have to scrimp, the reel is the place to do it.

Let us know what you'll be fishing for and I'm sure you'll get a lot of recommendations. The good news is that there are tons of great choices, and you don't have to spend a ton of money.
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Old 05-19-2010, 02:52 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Build you own...... Rod? 'combo'? build your own what? unless you are experienced in rod building, I'd say buy.... If you mean 'combo'-- I'd say it will be easier to buy a combo already put together. AND for the $$$, there are some fantastic combos available.

Do you have a Bass Pro (as per your link) or Cabelas by you? If so-- go and cast a few-- see what you like best. As for length and weight , I think you are right on-- with regards to 'action', You might do well to at least consider a mwedium action rod as well-- they tend to be more 'forgiving' than faster rods....

Local Fly shops ought to let you cast a few as well.... (since you linked to a Bass Pro outfit, I mentioned them and Cabelas first-- Don't discount a good Fly shop-- )
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Old 05-19-2010, 03:05 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

to the forum....got good advice from Mark and Dog...
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Old 05-19-2010, 03:11 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrines View Post
Hey Tampac welcome to the forum.

Having a friend that already fly fishes will be a big help in getting you started.

What kind of fish will you be chasing?

What types of water (big western rivers, small brushy streams a little of everything)

There are a number of great values out there, including TFO, Redington, Echo and many others.

A 9' 5 weight is a great all around trout rod, but may not be the best choice if you fish for bass.

A four piece rod is great if you'll be flying with it because you can store it in overhead compartment on most airlines instead of having to check it.

medium fast action will be a bit more forgiving than a fast action rod and will be a bit easier to learn on

I would go with a floating weight forward line instead of a double taper

There are many types of drags, a reel with an adjustable disc drag of cork or synthetic would be generally be preferable to a reel with a simple "click and pawl" drag, but even an inexpensive click and pawl would be fine for most types of fishing. For most fish in freshwater, in terms of priorities as far as bucks go, put your money into the rod and line, and if you have to scrimp, the reel is the place to do it.

Let us know what you'll be fishing for and I'm sure you'll get a lot of recommendations. The good news is that there are tons of great choices, and you don't have to spend a ton of money.

As it stands now, i do most of my fly fishing at my in-laws ranch. They have a big pond with catfish, bass, and perch. They also live about a 1/4 mile or less (walking distance) from the brazos river.

Eventually i want to go fish in other places so i want something that is generic enough that i can fish almost anywhere.


@raindog yes i have a Bass pro near me. I am thinking i want to spend between 100-175$


I want something that is fit for a beginner, but i do not want to have to go upgrade a year or so down the road when i get better and realize that my rod is a piece of junk.

If i need to spend more or less it's okay, that was just a range i had in my mind.
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Old 05-19-2010, 03:51 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Since you are talking about price points-- buy the best rod that you can-- it'll serve you well for years-- the TFO (I think) has a lifetime warranty-- good rods. Even Cabelas 'house brand' rods would serve you well for years-- I know many who still fish their 'beginner' cabels rods after 5 or 6 (or more) years.

Reels-- Unless you are fishing huge surf fish, drag is fairly unimportant... The line will create quite a brake for fish-- (imagine taking 60 ft. of fly line and folding in half, put the apex 30 feet out in the water and hold the two tag ends in your hands-- now try to drag it in-- you'll feel a lot of resistance.)


Line will be the only 'weak link' in a combo-- but should be good enough-- I've personally never spent more than 40 or so on line--- could spend upwards of 100.00 for really good (supposedly) line.... The combo lines will float just fine, and cast well enough. They won't be super slick and effortlessly shoot out of the rod, but they won't hinder your casting either.

I guess what I am saying is get a combo with a great rod, with a sufficient reel and line. After you feel that you have casting 'mastered' (if there is such a thing), you could invest in a really nice line and completely wake a really nice rod up...

///edit/// While I agree with Peregrines, (about 5 wt. being a great all around trout rod, but not the best for bass) In a perfect world, we could all have very task specific rods, but alas...... The only trouble you will have with a 5 wt. for bass is some of the bass bugs are big and wind resistant (hard to cast with 'lighter' lines), a 5 wt. will fight a 4 or 5 Lb. Largemouth with no issues--- and the sunnies will be much more fun on a 5 wt. than say an 8 wt..... You'd kill a bunch (of sunnies) with a bigger rod to them swallowing you flies- due to lack of sensitivity...

I am almost exclusively fishing a 3 wt. (for sunnies and LM Bass in the 1.5 to 2 Lb. range-- occasionally hook into bigger with the 3 wt.) I do have a 5 wt., 6 wt. and 8 wt. as well-- 8 wt. rarely gets used-- thought I needed it for bass-- live and learn..., the 6 wt. is more or less a back-up rod-- couldn't pass up a great deal.

Last edited by raindogt; 05-19-2010 at 04:01 PM. Reason: another thought....
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Old 05-19-2010, 03:59 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raindogt View Post
Since you are talking about price points-- buy the best rod that you can-- it'll serve you well for years-- the TFO (I think) has a lifetime warranty-- good rods. Even Cabelas 'house brand' rods would serve you well for years-- I know many who still fish their 'beginner' cabels rods after 5 or 6 (or more) years.

Reels-- Unless you are fishing huge surf fish, drag is fairly unimportant... The line will create quite a brake for fish-- (imagine taking 60 ft. of fly line and folding in half, put the apex 30 feet out in the water and hold the two tag ends in your hands-- now try to drag it in-- you'll feel a lot of resistance.)


Line will be the only 'weak link' in a combo-- but should be good enough-- I've personally never spent more than 40 or so on line--- could spend upwards of 100.00 for really good (supposedly) line.... The combo lines will float just fine, and cast well enough. They won't be super slick and effortlessly shoot out of the rod, but they won't hinder your casting either.

I guess what I am saying is get a combo with a great rod, with a sufficient reel and line. After you feel that you have casting 'mastered' (if there is such a thing), you could invest in a really nice line and completely wake a really nice rod up...

Thanks for the reply, it was very helpful.

I have another question, and forgive me if it's a stupid one...
The TFO rod i linked to in my OP appears to be set up to reel with right hand, is this something that is reversible?

Also, how difficult is it to replace the line on a reel down the road?
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Old 05-19-2010, 04:04 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

most reels (grain of salt) are reversible-- not sure about that specific one-- ask BPro guy-- usually a fairly easy conversion.

Replacing line is fairly simple-- just use your knot of choice to connect line to backing (I use albright knot-- which brings up a good point-- familiarize yourself with some knots-- http://www.orvis.com/intro.aspx?dir_id=758&subject=494.), and winding onto reel-- if you don't feel comfortable with your knots (although I'd say learn them- as I don't like trusting the shop guy's knots...) and making sure everything is just as it should be, the place that sells you the line should load it for you-

Last edited by raindogt; 05-19-2010 at 04:16 PM. Reason: forgot the second answer... lol
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Old 05-24-2010, 11:59 AM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Tampac66,

I wanted to write to you to give you the benefit of my experience. I have used cheap 6 wt rods my whole fishing career--about 20 years. My attitude was the man, not the rod, catches the fish. Recently a buddy of mine started buying expensive name brand rods and I noticed that he was generally outfising me. I broke down and put together a combo of a 5 wt, Sage rod and a really nice Ross reel. It DOES make a difference. My sage 5 wt has clearly improved my fishing. I fish in Colorado, both tail waters and bigger free stone rivers. I have caught 24 inch trout with it and had no trouble bringing them in. I don't ever intend to fish with anything else, except when I go to Montana in the summer when a 6 wt is a little better for the size of fish up there. I can't recommend the Sage rod highly enough (I don't work for Sage by the way).

Bret
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Old 05-24-2010, 01:59 PM
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Default Re: New to Fly Fishing. Help with rod.

Just went through this myself. To add to your confusion, be aware that Sage FLi and Launch rods can be found on discount -- as low as about 175 for the Launch, a bit higher for the FLi.

As tempting as it is to buy online, you just can't do this sight unseen. Go to the local dealer and swinging a bunch of rods in the parking lot.

After trying several different rods, I went with the FLi. I also tried a St. Croix Reign (on sale in your range). I liked it very much.
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