The North American Fly Fishing Forum

The North American Fly Fishing Forum (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/)
-   General Discussion (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/general-discussion/)
-   -   Tenkara. Anyone try it? (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/general-discussion/163075-tenkara-anyone-try.html)

maccadon3000 07-20-2011 08:58 PM

Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
So, I'm pretty interested in trying this out. Comparatively speaking, it's a relatively low start up cost with rods between $140 and $170 and lines around $20. It looks kind of fun to try, as an occasional break from the rods/reels. So, has anyone tried it and what do you think of it?


http://www.tenkarausa.com/index.php

ncflyboy 07-20-2011 10:20 PM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
Before I started flyfishing, I used something similar to Tenkara...a telescopic fishing pole made from fiberglass commonly known as a "breambuster." These poles are similar to Tenkara: no reel, telescopic, and are compact.

B&M (bnmpoles.com) offers more varieties than Tenkara...fiberglass or graphite...10' to 20' rod lenghts...$9 to $27.

Tie on a Cortland 10 meter line double taper line ($15 from Bass Pro Shops) in sizes 3wt-5wt. Visit Wal-Mart and pick up a leader for $ 1.87.

For less than $60, you can be the "coolest looking breambuster flyfishing angler" at your favorite fishing hole! :D

Cheers,

Robert

darwin 07-20-2011 10:37 PM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
When I was a little boy we called it cane pole fishin. Got the bamboo for free to ;)
A Tenkara rod would be more convenient to carry around and would work nice for small fish. I do like the flies the make :)

CM_Stewart 07-21-2011 07:35 AM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
If you're going to try it, you owe it to yourself to try the real thing rather than a Breambuster, etc. The main advantage of tenkara is that line used is so light you can keep it all off the water so you get fantastic drag-free drifts. To cast a line that light ( essentially just a 15-18' leader) you need a rod designed for it. All the various crappie rods may look similar to a tenkara rod, but they were designed to cast a bobber, a couple split shot and a worm. They don't have the right action. They might cast a 3wt line just fine, but a 3 wt line is going to drop to the water's surface at the end of your cast, just like it does with your 3wt fly rod. (So really, if you're going to use a regular fly line, you might just as well stick with a regular fly rod.)

I've got a half dozen different crappie rods. I've got a cane pole. They're not the same as my tenkara rods.

If you try to save $60 with a cheap substutute, you might very reasonably wonder what all the fuss is about tenkara and after a couple times out never use it again. You wouldn't have saved $60, you would have wasted $60 and still not know what tenkara is all about.

I'm sure the guys who suggest a Bream Buster or cane pole mean well and just want to save you some dough, but I'm also sure they've never fished with a tenkara rod.

You can spin fish with a fly rod and fly fish with a spinning rod. Does it work? Kind of but not very well. If you want to try tenkara, get a tenkara rod.

mojo 07-21-2011 08:01 AM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CM_Stewart (Post 289381)
If you're going to try it, you owe it to yourself to try the real thing rather than a Breambuster, etc. The main advantage of tenkara is that line used is so light you can keep it all off the water so you get fantastic drag-free drifts. To cast a line that light ( essentially just a 15-18' leader) you need a rod designed for it. All the various crappie rods may look similar to a tenkara rod, but they were designed to cast a bobber, a couple split shot and a worm. They don't have the right action. They might cast a 3wt line just fine, but a 3 wt line is going to drop to the water's surface at the end of your cast, just like it does with your 3wt fly rod. (So really, if you're going to use a regular fly line, you might just as well stick with a regular fly rod.)

I've got a half dozen different crappie rods. I've got a cane pole. They're not the same as my tenkara rods.

If you try to save $60 with a cheap substutute, you might very reasonably wonder what all the fuss is about tenkara and after a couple times out never use it again. You wouldn't have saved $60, you would have wasted $60 and still not know what tenkara is all about.

I'm sure the guys who suggest a Bream Buster or cane pole mean well and just want to save you some dough, but I'm also sure they've never fished with a tenkara rod.

You can spin fish with a fly rod and fly fish with a spinning rod. Does it work? Kind of but not very well. If you want to try tenkara, get a tenkara rod.

One of the best explainations on this subject I've heard yet.
The "Breambuster" advocates are all over the ff'ing forums, yet like you, I believe they've never fished or even picked up a Tenkara rod.

wabi 07-21-2011 08:21 AM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
I've given it a good bit of thought, but haven't tried it yet.
I did try the telescopic pole substitute and quickly realized it wasn't going to work well.
Most of my fishing for small panfish could probably be done with a tenkara, but the 3wt works very well, too.:D

BigCliff 07-21-2011 09:03 AM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
Here's a review I did a while back- http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/fo...mes-texas.html

ncflyboy 07-21-2011 01:51 PM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
MOJO,

I have heard of people that have used conventional rods to cast flyline...and it works. I may drag out a few different rods and try this for myself. I have a 4 1/2' spinning rod that may work in some tight spots.

I like a challenge...I may tie a small section of flyline to a breambuster and try it!

I have met people using flygear with a live cricket on the end...with no trouble casting. From what I could see, the rods looked to be 8'-9', probably a 5wt or 6wt.

I have heard of people (using a regular flyfishing outfit) that only cast the leader to trout in a very small stream. Is this really any different than someone simply using a breambuster with a fly tied on the end? If I were fishing in a stream marked "flies only" (we have these in NC) and I only had conventional gear, I'd simply forego the expense of flygear and purchase a breambuster and a handful of flies...as long as the fishing is close range!

I'm not knocking Tenkara, or any other forms of angling. I'm merely entertaining different forms of tossing flies.

That reminds me...is it possible to tie a similar lenght of flyline to a flyrod tip and see how it compares to a Tenkara rod?


Cheers,

Robert

BigCliff 07-21-2011 03:30 PM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ncflyboy (Post 289511)
MOJO,

I have heard of people that have used conventional rods to cast flyline...and it works. I may drag out a few different rods and try this for myself. I have a 4 1/2' spinning rod that may work in some tight spots.

I like a challenge...I may tie a small section of flyline to a breambuster and try it!

I have met people using flygear with a live cricket on the end...with no trouble casting. From what I could see, the rods looked to be 8'-9', probably a 5wt or 6wt.

I have heard of people (using a regular flyfishing outfit) that only cast the leader to trout in a very small stream. Is this really any different than someone simply using a breambuster with a fly tied on the end? If I were fishing in a stream marked "flies only" (we have these in NC) and I only had conventional gear, I'd simply forego the expense of flygear and purchase a breambuster and a handful of flies...as long as the fishing is close range!

I'm not knocking Tenkara, or any other forms of angling. I'm merely entertaining different forms of tossing flies.

That reminds me...is it possible to tie a similar lenght of flyline to a flyrod tip and see how it compares to a Tenkara rod?


Cheers,

Robert

As info- no real Tenkara rigs use fly line.

As mentioned above, it would be too heavy and its tendency to droop would interfere with being able to "dapple" the fly.

Tenkara lines are either furled mono or fluorocarbon. This adds enough weight (compared to monofilament) to aid casting, but not so much as to cause droop.

Another benefit of these materials compared to a fly line is the ability to fish deep. Tenkara works quite well for czech nymphing style fishing where the fly is straight down from the rod tip. If you've got a 3' mono tippet on 9' of fly line, fishing 6' deep ain't happening.

ncflyboy 07-22-2011 09:59 AM

Re: Tenkara. Anyone try it?
 
Hi Big Cliff,

Thanks for setting me straight. I've learned more about the subject!:)

Cheers,

Robert


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:30 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.