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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 10-25-2013, 03:47 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

Here's Wisconsin TU's "CPR" (Consider Proper Release) Booklet. We also have CPR Signs at the parking lots of trout steams.

http://www.wisconsintu.org/LinkClick...bid=64&mid=378

Wisconsin Trout Unlimited > Programs > CPR
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Old 10-25-2013, 07:04 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

Great article, Mike, - thank.

I use only barbless hooks now and my landing net is the new rubber compound. Most of the time, once the fish is in the net and the tension is off the line, if it's lip or mouth hooked, the fish will toss the hook and then swim out of the net when I turn it upside down (I do all of this in the water; the fish never comes out of the water).

If they've swallowed the fly, then they are out of water and in a pre-wet hand for as long as it takes me to get the hemos down their throat to get the hook dislodged. I usually resuscitate such fish by moving them back and forth gently in the water to get water to their gills as quickly as possible. when they start moving their tails, I let them go.

It's been a long time since I've lost a fish - absolutely hate it when it happens.

Pocono
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Old 10-25-2013, 09:43 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

Alan, your methods are the ethical ways that we C&R fisherman all should follow. That article in Trout magazine I linked to cites some data on mortality rates of trout that are kept out of water for 30 and 60 seconds, after exercise. It is significant compared to fish that have not been exercised. I've heard the 30 seconds rule before and have long tried to adhere to it. The angle of the article asks the question, is the photo worth it? Because it is the photo op when a fish is held out of water after a long fight and with the knowledge that it is what kills most fish (after they swim away) we have to be more responsible. All of us, I do. The glossy mags, the blogs, the videos, this forum - they all urge us to show off our catch, to share it, to prove it.

I have strong and conflicted feelings about photographing fish out of the water.

The article ends with a quote from Jay Zimmerman: "the photo of a fish of a lifetime is never worth the life of a fish of a lifetime."
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Old 10-26-2013, 09:29 AM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

Every time one of these threads comes up I cant help but picture the CPW doing their fish shocking runs in fabled trout waters. They handle those trout like they are nothing fragile.

When I take a fish picture fishing by myself, I get about one out of a hundred to turn out because I am so concerned about the fish staying in the water. Some fish just don't cooperate. I have figured out strategies that seem to work really well and do not stress the fish to badly.

from the water, lift the fish, take the pic, back in the water. A max of 5-10 seconds if you are properly prepared. My camera beeps 3 seconds before shutter, that's my q to lift.

---------- Post added at 08:29 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:12 AM ----------

Click the image to open in full size.

This is one of the rarest fish you can find on earth. We have spent almost 300 million saving it from extinction. What does this say to all of us about how important and fragile these dinosaurs are?

These pics are always coming up so I actually sat down with our Head fisheries manager for the state and asked him about the photo. He laughed. Said he doesn't worry one iota about the grip and grin and that people do not realize how tough fish are. Kinda weird coming from one of the most senior trout bios in the nation and the absolute authority on Whirling Disease in the lower 48.

Treat the resource with respect is the best rule, feel good about helping the fish feel good.
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Old 10-26-2013, 02:52 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

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Originally Posted by cochise View Post

Every time one of these threads comes up I cant help but picture the CPW doing their fish shocking runs in fabled trout waters. They handle those trout like they are nothing fragile.
Cochise,

Unfortunately your fisheries technicians are not aware of the newest research on death and damage of electroshocking. By your description of the rough handling of the fish, they killed a number of fish. See the second reference below. (Mortality, usually by asphyxiation, is a common result of excessive exposure to tetanizing intensities near electrodes or poor handling of captured specimens.)

The fact is that electroshocking kills fish, especially the larger fish. It damages the spine, and the survivors grow slower. Electroshocking has been banned in parts of Alaska and should not be used to survey endangered trout species. Anglers noted dead rainbows after an electrofishing crew sampled the river and a study was done by Alaska which showed high fatality rates in large rainbows. (See the first reference below)

The reason that it is still used in most fisheries is that it is used only on small sections of a river and then the results are assumed to mirror the rest of the river. Therefore, although the effects damage the fish in the section that is electrofished. when these effects are spread out over the entire population of the river, up to 1% of the population of fish are killed on average and this is not significant over the entire river.

Here are some references:

http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/FedAidPDFs/fms90-03.pdf

Electrofishing induced mortality to Rainbow Trout

"Rainbow Trout sustained high rates of mortality (13.9%) and injury (40.9%) and electrofishing has been discontinued as a method of sampling for this species."

http://electrofishing.net/wp-content...snyder2003.pdf

Fishery researchers and managers in the Colorado River Basin, and elsewhere, are particularly concerned about the harmful effects of electrofishing on fish, especially endangered species. Although often not externally obvious or fatal, spinal injuries and associated hemorrhages sometimes have been documented in over 50% of fish examined internally. Such injuries can occur anywhere in the electrofishing field at or above the intensity threshold for twitch. These injuries are believed to result from powerful convulsions of body musculature (possibly epileptic seizures) caused mostly by sudden changes in voltage as when electricity is pulsed or switched on or off.

Mortality, usually by asphyxiation, is a common result of excessive exposure to tetanizing intensities near electrodes or poor handling of captured specimens.


Shocking News: Study Guidelines

[i]Introduction

….Not until the late 1980s, when Sharber and Carothers (1988) reported that about one of every two large (>30 cm) rainbow trout caught by pulsed DC electrofishing in the Colorado River had internal injuries caused by capture, did we realize that fish captured by electrofishing may be injured even though they appear and act normal when released. Studies during the late 1980s and early 1990s in Alaska (Holmes et al. 1990), Wyoming (Meyer and Miller 1990) and Montana (Fredenberg 1992) generally confirmed the findings in Arizona: large trout are at high risk of internal injury (spinal damage and dorsal muscle hemorrhage) when captured by pulsed DC electrofishing, operating at 50-60 pulses per second (pps or Hz), the most commonly-used waveform of pulsed DC in North America.

Soon after this realization, some western states and federal agencies placed self-imposed restrictions on the use of electrofishing (Schill and Beland 1995), most of which remain in effect today. During the 1990s a growing concern about the electrofishing-injury issue resulted an urgent calls for research (e.g., Snyder 1992) and wider bans on electrofishing in waters containing threatened or endangered stocks of salmonids (Nielsen 1998).

Influence of Electrofishing Pulse Shape on Spinal Injuries in Adult Rainbow Trout - ResearchGate

Influence of Electrofishing Pulse Shape on Spinal Injuries in Adult Rainbow Trout

ABSTRACT

Adult rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri captured by electrofishing were analyzed for spinal injury by X-ray photography and autopsies. The effects of three electrical pulse shapes were compared. Of 209 fish captured, 50% suffered spinal injuries involving an average of eight vertebrae that were dislocated, splintered, or both. One-quarter-sine wave pulses injured a significantly higher proportion of fish (67%) than either exponential pulses (44%) or square wave pulses (44%; P < 0.05).



Spinal injury rates in three wild trout populations in Colorado after eight years of backpack electrofishing - ResearchGate

Spinal injury rates in three wild trout populations in Colorado after eight years of backpack electrofishing

ABSTRACT

We examined long-term effects of annual intensive backpack electrofishing on rates of spinal injury and population abundance of three salmonid and one catostomid species in three small northern Colorado streams and compared rates of externally evident injuries to actual injuries determined by X ray. After 6–8 years of annual three-pass removal electrofishing, injury rates for brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in treatment sections of two streams averaged 10.4% and 12.3%, but were 0% in previously unshocked controls. In a third stream containing all species in sympatry, longnose suckers Catostomus catostomus sustained the highest average injury rates (9.6%), followed by brown trout Salmo trutta (6.9%), rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (4.0%), and brook trout (3.5%). These rates were based on external evaluation and probably [u]greatly underestimated actual rates[u] of healed injuries because 44% of X-rayed fish with no externally evident spinal injury showed previous injury. Despite the high incidence of spinal injury, abundance of all salmonid species remained stable or increased in the three streams during the 8-year study, which indicated that there were no detectable adverse population effects of repeated electrofishing. In contrast, abundance of longnose sucker declined significantly. Our results indicate that spinal injuries accumulated over time and that species probably differ in susceptibility to the deleterious effects of electrofishing.
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Last edited by silver creek; 10-26-2013 at 03:57 PM.
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  #46 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2013, 02:58 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

I've not had the pleasure of being hit with a taser, but it doesn't look like it would enhance your day...

if a fisherman ran for his life from a big brown bear for a few minutes and then immediately had his head held under water for 30 secs to a minute he'd understand how fish feel too...
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Old 10-26-2013, 04:29 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

Whether we Catch and Release or Electroshock and Release, there will be a percentage of fish that will die as a result. However, the ability of an otherwise heathy fishery to reproduce is able to replace the fish that die.

In a healthy fishery, the population of the river is determined by the carrying capacity of the river. Fish like any other natural organisms will reproduce until they overpopulate their environment and the weak die. On average 30% - 60% of the fish die naturally every year.

Compared to this natural loss, the loss from C&R or Electroshock is relatively small, and has no overall population effect. The loss from C&R or Electroshock means that other fish which would have died do not, and they replace the fish that died from C&R and Electroshock.
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  #48 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2013, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

I've participated in quite a lot of backpack shocking in the DC region and I will admit that some of the sampled fish will undoubtedly die in any given section that is sampled. It's not as easy as you'd think to calibrate and adjust to *just the right amount to effectively shock the fish but without killing them instantly. Conductivity increase from snow melt (road salting) in the winter is often a problem on some of the streams here and elsewhere.

That said, let's not get goofy here. Stream sampling is generally considered beneficial for providing instantaneous and long term data for a particular stream.

I'm not sure that worrying about electroshocking is really warranted. I can think of probably 30 other, far more important means of bettering a stream.

Not that information about shocking isn't interesting -- it definitely is.
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  #49 (permalink)  
Old 10-28-2013, 11:23 AM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikel View Post
if a fisherman ran for his life from a big brown bear for a few minutes and then immediately had his head held under water for 30 secs to a minute he'd understand how fish feel too...
If you can stay in front of big brown bear for 30 seconds you are way ahead of the game!

Seriously though, that is the analogy: full out sprint a 100 yards then hold your breath for even 15 seconds. Good luck.

Not that I am condoning elctro-shocking, but the difference here is significant in the science cited in the Trout article between "exercised" fish being out of water and fish in a resting state. Think of the analogy. I'm not a fishery scientist so I'm not sure of any of this.

Again, the take away is to always holding fish out of the water as much as possible.
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Old 10-28-2013, 08:23 PM
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Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

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Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
Compared to this natural loss, the loss from C&R or Electroshock is relatively small, and has no overall population effect. The loss from C&R or Electroshock means that other fish which would have died do not, and they replace the fish that died from C&R and Electroshock.
This would imply that careful fish handling isn't as important as we thought. You may not have meant to imply that, but it's how your information can be interpreted.

Of course, the operative word is "healthy fishery." There are places I fish where the population is small and every trout I handle is precious.

However, I would argue that no matter how healthy and prolific the fishery, we should practice the most careful fish handling we are able. Life is full of habits. By making it a habit to handle fish as minimally as possible, and with great care, we will minimize our effect on the health of any place we fish.
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