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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 06-20-2013, 11:07 PM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

If you can see the water, the fish can see you. Stay low, and drop you fly into the pool without looking. When you hear the splash, pick up. The other option, if you can cast well enough, is to stand very far downstream and make a long, accurate cast.

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Old 06-21-2013, 10:10 AM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

These are great replies, I will try out those suggestions next time I can go out!
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Old 06-21-2013, 11:03 AM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

The key in catching fish in small streams is to avoid detection.

Trout detect you in two ways. By seeing you and by "feeling you" approach through their lateral line vibration detection system.

Stay low and go slow. Stay away from the bank if you can.

The fish may see everything but they cannot recognize everything because of Snell's law of refractions which results in Snell's Window through which they see everything that is above the water level.

snell's window - Google Search

Because of Snell's Law, everything under the 10 degree line is compressed and distorted. It is their blind spot.

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In a small stream, the trout cannot get very deep and this limits the size of the window. Use the rule of 6 to figure out how low you need to be. Divide your distance from the rise by 6 to figure out how "low" you need to stay. For example, at 20 feet from the trout, you need to stay under 3 feet.

If you approach from behind the fish, the width of the small stream means the tippet will likely fall into the window. If you cast above the rise, the entire tippet will hit the window. If you find that that this type of cast puts the fish down, you can then try to cast the fly just into the back of the window with the next riser. Try casting the fly 3 feet behind the rise.

If the upstream approach does not work, you will need to cast from above. The problem with this approach is that if the trout refuses the fly, you will likely spook the trout when you lift the line off of the water for the next cast. You get only one shot in a tiny stream unless the fish is in the riffles that will mask the disturbance of lifting the line.

If the stream is wide enough to get the line out of the fish's window, take the line to the side of the stream furthest from the rise and slowly strip it back until it is well away from the rise before lifting the fly off the water.
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Old 06-21-2013, 11:23 AM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

Mr. Sticky aka Silver is at it again. Excellent post as always.
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Old 06-21-2013, 03:06 PM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

Thanks for the kind words Jaybo41,

I forgot to add that if you are fishing these small streams during the summer, try a terrestrial. They work well when hitting the back end of the window. Trout are used to the beetles and ants falling in and they don't alway fall in ahead of the fish. Use the size and color to match the ones along the stream.

---------- Post added at 03:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:51 PM ----------

Here is a puzzle on small stream fishing posted by an angler on FAOL. He posted the photo below in 2009 and asked "sunny day. kinda shallow hole. where was the 18 inch brown laying?"


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I like puzzles so......

Where is the fish and why?
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Old 06-21-2013, 06:37 PM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

Something to add to Silver's excellent post above. IF you can get an upstream shot at the fish, picking at the side of the window with a "J" cast is often effective. If the cast is ignored, let the whole thing drift back to you. Strip in most of the slack line and use a roll cast pick up and "J" cast in a little tighter. It can be a slow process, but it is one of the few techniques that offers more than one shot.

Not sure what the proper name of a "J" cast is, but it is sort of an aerial mend accomplished by rotating your wrist while the line is in the air.

---------- Post added at 05:37 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:06 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
Here is a puzzle on small stream fishing posted by an angler on FAOL. He posted the photo below in 2009 and asked "sunny day. kinda shallow hole. where was the 18 inch brown laying?
I'd be looking right at that 90* bend tight against the (probably undercut) back we can't see in the image. Looks like it narrows right as it gets deep, so just above that.

First cast would be a bit above the hanging clump just above the riffle and work that far back with what ever the current terrestrial is.

Then again the current side of those large rocks look pretty tasty too.

Looks like a little bit of heaven to me. Was looking it and decided the first thing to do would be to park a was back on that grass above the sand and decide on catching the couple large fish or catching probably sacrificing those and picking of the other ( probably more numerous) smaller fish lurking around.
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:34 AM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

My answer and the reason I chose that spot is on this thread:

where?
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Old 06-22-2013, 12:53 PM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

Quote:
Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
Thanks for the kind words Jaybo41,

I forgot to add that if you are fishing these small streams during the summer, try a terrestrial. They work well when hitting the back end of the window. Trout are used to the beetles and ants falling in and they don't alway fall in ahead of the fish. Use the size and color to match the ones along the stream.

---------- Post added at 03:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:51 PM ----------

Here is a puzzle on small stream fishing posted by an angler on FAOL. He posted the photo below in 2009 and asked "sunny day. kinda shallow hole. where was the 18 inch brown laying?"


Click the image to open in full size.


I like puzzles so......

Where is the fish and why?
I really like this.........a great learning tool for everyone........I would like to see more!! Encore!!......... In it's own tread maybe.......
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Old 11-11-2013, 11:41 PM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

Just in case the original post on FAOL gets taken down, Here is the spot I chose with my reasons for choosing it.

Click the image to open in full size.

The fellow that posted the puzzle asked me if I had fished that spot before, but I had not. Here is my answer to him as to why I picked that spot.

"I've never fished this spot before. The last time I fished the Driftless Area had to be over 20 years ago. It would require an overnight stay.

The reason I chose that spot is that I figured the fish would be in soft water right next to the current edge.

There are then two choices, the right or the left side. If it is on the right side, it would be up against the bank. The water is shallower on the right side and the fish would be more exposed. The water is deeper on the left side so it is safer.

The second reason is water velocity. The fish has much "softer" water with less current on the left side, so it can maintain it's position more easily.

The third reason is that there is greater current volume on the left side which is closer to the middle of the stream. The center of the current has a greater volume of water and a greater volume means more food is in the current.

Note that water velocity and volume are not the same. The velocity is greater on the right because the bank limits the distance the fish can move away from the current. On the left, the fish can move further to the left or it can get right down to the bottom to get away from the current. So there is greater shelter potential on the left.

The only reason for the fish to be on the right side is if terrestrials were falling in from the bank or overhanging vegetation. There are no overhanging branches or grass to provide overhead shade and cover or any falling insects.

The fourth reason is the length of the drift. On the right side, the fish has to make a quick decision because there is little room for him to drift back and leisurely examine the fly. On the left side, the fish can stay in the quiet water and the drift lane is longer and slower.

So safety, shelter, more food, and a longer drift lane are all reasons the fish should be on the left side of the current.

There are two other reasons for the left side. You said it was a sunny day. Fish don't have eyelids so they are sensitive to bright light. There is no shade anywhere, so the only way to escape bright light is water depth.

The final reason is the size of the window. The deeper a fish holds, the larger the window. The larger the window, the more surface food that enters the window.

The right side next to the bank limits the depth that the fish can hold. So it is more exposed to the bright sunlight and the fish has a smaller window to see surface food.

Again the left side is better.

Take away lesson is that each situation is individual. You need to study each situation. It is wrong to automatically chose the bank as the best lie.

Look to the biological needs of a trout. Safety is first, then shelter from the current, then amount of food, and finally the time the fish has to examine the food. All factors are better in the deeper softer water on the left side.

The main exception to this order of importance is if there is a hatch on. The fish will temporarily go to feeding position that has greater current and less safety during hatches but this is temporary feeding lie. The second exception is during spawning. The final exception is to find cool water to survive, the fish can be in unsafe positions."
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:29 AM
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Default Re: Tiny Creek Brookies

Just skimmed through all the posts. For me, the most important observation I read was, "if you can see the trout, the trout can see you."
or
"Avoid detection."

Many good suggestions as to how to do this have been offered.

I just want to add to some of the previous suggestions: if space permits, stand back from the creek and cast so your fly line lights on the grass at the edge, and only your leader and fly touch the water. As someone else already suggested, wait until you hear the sound of a rise or take, or watch the butt section of your leader for a twitch and then go into action.

I also like the idea someone offered of a downstream drift. You can present the fly before the line is seen. However, it's got to be a situation where you can stand far back enough, and cast far enough to avoid being seen by the trout. Or, if the creek has a bend to it, you might mask your presence that way.

Not all creeks are equal. Some allow us to walk up close and make a standard cast, others don't. The info about walking softly is important too. I often fish creeks going through cow pastures, and either the ground doesn't telegraph the vibrations, or, because of the cows, the fish get used to seismic activity and I can tromp along without effect. Not all places are that forgiving.
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