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Old 04-26-2008, 11:14 AM
Ken Ken is offline
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Default Which lines?

Greetings,

Have a new 7 wt. outfit I will use for all occasions though mostly I will find myself at larger reservoirs and lakes (float tubing) Would like some suggestions on two or three lines that would give me the advantage in any situation. In the spring I fish for larger trout and landlocks and smallmouth. As it gets warmer I can fish shallower for bass though need to get deeper for the smallies and trout. A floating line is without question, but for a second line I cannot decide between a sink tip and full sinking. And a third line.......intermediate perhaps(?)

My best,
Ken
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Old 04-26-2008, 02:25 PM
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Default Re: Which lines?

Hey Ken,

Now thats a question that torments us all! I gave up trying to limit myself, bought a cassette reel and load up my Willy J chest pack - ha ha!

Ok, if I had to limit myself to three - I concur, a floating line is a must. Lengthen the leader, slow the retrieve, using a weighted pattern and I'll use my floating line to fish depths up to 25'. I use a Rio Gold in the flow and a Monic clear floater on the still.

My next most fished line would probably be a clear intermediate. Its a pretty versatile line and I use it on stillwater, on the flows, and in tidal estuaries. I use the SA Stillwater, but had a Rio Aqualux which shot very nicely.

I like a type 3 full sink to get down and dirty. Using the countdown method and with a little patience, I can use it to fish virtually any depth (within reason).

Hope this helps a little.
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Old 04-26-2008, 10:35 PM
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Default Re: Which lines?

Consider a shooting head sytem and cover all depths with one reel.
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Old 04-27-2008, 06:15 AM
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Default Re: Which lines?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken View Post
Greetings,

Have a new 7 wt. outfit I will use for all occasions though mostly I will find myself at larger reservoirs and lakes (float tubing) Would like some suggestions on two or three lines that would give me the advantage in any situation. In the spring I fish for larger trout and landlocks and smallmouth. As it gets warmer I can fish shallower for bass though need to get deeper for the smallies and trout. A floating line is without question, but for a second line I cannot decide between a sink tip and full sinking. And a third line.......intermediate perhaps(?)

My best,
Ken
KENT,
I use a reel with 2 extra spools. I use a floater, a full sink (fast) and a clear intermediate. These 3 lines can be adapted to pretty well any situation.

God bless,
Don
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Old 04-27-2008, 09:50 AM
Guy Guy is offline
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Default Re: Which lines?

The floater as you say is a must have. With the other two lines, you have a fair bit of choice. Intermediate lines have some advantages over floating lines when casting in windy conditions and to very spooky fish (if you use a clear intermediate, you can shorten your leader which usually translates to better leader and fly turnover), but they really don't fish much deeper than a floating line would with a longer leader. To get down into that 2-5 feet depth range easily, I would suggest a type II sink tip. Below that, you can go to a type IV or V sink tip or full sinker. I fish with both full sinks and sink tips. Sink tips are easier to pick up and recast. Full sinks do get down faster, but they sink "belly down" which is means you have to retreive most of the line before recasting. Integrated or density compensated sinking lines "sink tip down" are a good choice. These integrated lines (which are really sink tips with an intermediate running line) do cast a country mile as well.

Guy
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Old 04-28-2008, 06:58 AM
Ken Ken is offline
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Default Re: Which lines?

Greetings,
It seems that it is a matter of deciding between sink-tip and full sinking lines. I know very little about shooting heads, have never seen them in action, nor do I know anyone using them. Though the shooting head systems seem to be more economical, they would just add to the confusion at this point. However, my guess is that sooner or later I will be making that choice.
The suggestion of using a type II sinking tip makes sense for shallower fishing. If I can get down a foot or more with a floating line then that would negate the use of an intermediate line (for now!). I have used a sinking tip line in the past for deeper water but found that it didn't keep the fly (streamer) where I wanted it. With each strip of the line the fly would not only move forward but up as well. Probably a better action for nymphs etc. This time around I will try a full sinking line.
I greatly appreciate all of you suggestions.
My best,
Ken
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Old 04-28-2008, 09:40 AM
Guy Guy is offline
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Default Re: Which lines?

Ken,

Shooting heads are best suited for distance casting. Short casts can be awkward due to the "hinging" effect were head attaches to the running line (usually it's a loop to loop connection).

Certainly a regular full sink is a good choice that will do the job for you as you describe and they have caught tons of fish over the years.

The density compensated sinking lines also do a good job of staying in the "zone". They sink tip down quickly and provide a much straighter line between fly and angler than either a sink tip or full sink does. Technically that should translate into better feel for strikes and better hook sets. Personally I prefer the DC lines now when I need to fish the deeper stuff. However being the "new kid on the block" so to speak, they are more expensive. Keep an eye on Ebay, occasionally you'll find a DC line there at a reduced price.

Tight lines!

Guy
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Old 04-28-2008, 01:37 PM
Ken Ken is offline
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Default Re: Which lines?

Guy,
Any suggestions as far as these density compensated lines are concerned? If I remember correctly, SA has or had a line similar to this where a sinking tip was attached to an intermediate line.....

My best,
Ken
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Old 04-28-2008, 01:51 PM
Ken Ken is offline
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Default Re: Which lines?

......The line I was thinking of is SA's 'Custom Tip Express.' Does this fall under the DC category? (sink tip/neutral density running line)
Anyone have any experience with this line? Seems like it might fit the bill.

Regards,
Ken
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Old 04-29-2008, 12:19 AM
Guy Guy is offline
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Default Re: Which lines?

Ken,

I presume that the custom tip series is the same as the wet tip express series, but I am not 100% sure...... Anyways I have the SA 275 grain saltwater wet tip express. I do a lot of pike and walleye flyfishing and love that line when the fish have moved into 5 - 12 feet of water. I like the saltwater tapers for pike fishing as these lines are designed for longer casts with larger flies. The saltwater wet tip express has a 32 foot head compared to the 25 foot head on the freshwater wet tip express. I do put this line on my 7 wt on occasion, but the 32 foot 275 grain head is a bit much for it so I normally fish it with an 8 or 9 wt rod. I would think that the 250 grain (25 foot head) freshwater taper would be a real nice match up for most 7 wt rods. And yes, these lines are density compensated lines with a heavier tip, a graduated density transition and a floating running line.

SA also makes a true full sinking "Uniform Sink" which is also DC, but truthfully I have never fished one so I better not comment. I have fished several of RIO's DC lines and without getting into details, I do like them as well.

Tight lines!

Guy

PS. I used to try and flyfish in water deeper than 12 feet, but came to the realization several years ago that flyfishing really is best when kept at a shallow level. You can fly fish deeper than 12 feet, but I don't like to be outfished by the gear guys,,,,just too hard on my ego!!! So I move "up" in elevation or latitude to where I can find cooler water temps and shallow minded fish!
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