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Old 04-28-2008, 03:19 AM
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Default What is Density Compensated? What is Teeny type?

Ok a few questions around sinking line.

So what does "Density Compensated" mean? (Nothing on Wikipeida on it.)

Why is Density Compensated line weight rated by Grain (i.e. 250grain) instead of the normal 6wt/ 7wt etc. ?

How do you know what grain of Density compensated line to use with a given rod (i.e.my rod is 7wt.)?

What does "Teeny" type mean and how does it differ from other lines?

Thanks again for the help!

Rob
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Old 04-28-2008, 12:49 PM
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Default Re: What is Density Compensated? What is Teeny type?

A density compensated line is built so that it will sink in a straight line extending out from the rod tip. (if the density of the coating was consistent all the way out, it would not sink in a straight line, due to the fact that the line itself does not have the same amount of coating in all spots.

Frank has posted a chart listing the line weights in grains quite a few times. The search feature should pop it up.

A Teeny Type line is also known as an integrated shooting head line. the first 24-30' will be a fast sinking section with floating running line behind it and hopefully a transition section that reduces the hinging effect in between the two different sections. They're cast like a shooting head.

The shooting head realm tends to operate in grains instead of line weights because its an exact weight instead of just an acceptable range (like a given line weight designation is) Some shooting head flingers will throw heads that are one size heavy for the rod, some two, some 1.62, etc.

There are some density comp'd full sink lines listed by the line weight. The grain designation is generally used just for shooting heads, teeny type lines, and spey tips.
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Old 04-28-2008, 01:30 PM
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Default Re: What is Density Compensated? What is Teeny type?

So are the "Teeny type" the same as any other "Sink tip" like the Orvis

I assume these are all just floating lines with "density compensated" tips?

Oh man I have alot to learn. . . Now Im trying to figure out how these differ from a "shooting head", and how that difers from a spey tip. . . . <sigh> I wonder if they offer classes at the community collage.
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Old 04-28-2008, 11:07 PM
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Default Re: What is Density Compensated? What is Teeny type?

OK, a "sink tip" line generally refers to a floating line with a 6-10' sinking section at the end of it. The sink rate of that sinking section varies, but that's generally how they're built. Sinking leaders have become fairly popular in recent years and I'm noticing fewer traditional "sink tip lines" offered all the time.

A Teeny type line is sometimes viewed as a sink tip, but you'd be best off to ignore that anomaly. Its really a separate category. If you see a line marketed that has a 24-30' sinking section followed by a floating (or intermediate) line, that falls into the teeny/shooting head category.

If all of a given line sinks, thats a full sinking line, the third category. I view these as ideal when fishing stillwaters, but they necessitate a stripping basket in most every other situation.

Ignore "spey tips" completely, until you feel the need to buy a fly rod that's over 12' long.
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