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Old 11-07-2008, 05:50 PM
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Default Fishing Deeper

I have a question regarding fishing deeper. I know it will depend on the situation, but is it better to fish weighted flies, add split shot/some form of weight or use a sinking tip line? Weighted flies or some form of weight added to the line would seem to me to be more practical. However, I read something a guide wrote about fishing a particular river where he said he switched to a sinking tip or full sink and his catch went up 4x. If you go the sink tip route do you just have a separate reel or spool loaded with it so you can switch out? Finally does the recommendation change if it is a river/stream vs. a lake/pond?
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Old 11-07-2008, 07:07 PM
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Default Re: Fishing Deeper

I don't know much about lakes/ponds and have only been fly fishing for 2 years so I am sure people on these boards that know more than me will have better advice but....

If you want to go deep I think a sink tip for streamers would work great. I have this feeling that if you put too much weight on a fly it won't look natural under the water. If a light fly is floating freely on 6-10 ft. of leader/tippet and the thing that is getting down to the bottom is the line, it might behave more naturally. Depends on the type of presentation you are going for I guess.

I have an intermediate sink line spooled up on an extra spool for easy changes and that is convenient.

Good luck!
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Old 11-07-2008, 08:53 PM
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Default Re: Fishing Deeper

I generally think sink tip or sinking lines are better for fishing streamers or in stillwaters. When fishing moving water and wanting to get flies down deep I either go with weighted flies or shot.

Which of those two routes I pick just depends on my mood i suppose. For turbulent pocket water, I often I use a size 10 copper john with a huge bead and lead wire to get the rig down and then have a unweighted soft hackle tied onto a tag about 15" above that. If I was needing to fish deeper and slower water, I would likely use a bounce nymphing rig (shot on bottom, fly(s) above that) to get down to where the fish are.

In general, unweighted flies are better because they will move more, but beadheads have caught millions of trout and are often the best option to hug the bottom.
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Old 11-07-2008, 10:16 PM
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Default Re: Fishing Deeper

True about the bead head thing. My favorite fly is a Beadhead Hare's Ear Flashback nymph. Caught fish in all sorts of situations on that fly.
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Old 11-08-2008, 09:18 AM
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Default Re: Fishing Deeper


Instead of buying a sink-tip line you might think about using leadheads.
I think Orvi$ might sell some but the ones I use I made myself from Cortland LC-13 (lead core line, 13 grains per foot). Cortland might even sell a DIY kit that includes some of those 'chinese finger puzzle' loops...
I carry a 6", a 1", and a 2" section in my trout kit so that I can use any combination from 6" to 3 1/2 feet on my floating lines
In my salt water kit I carry sections of 2 and 4 feet.
I've even used these on full sinking lines for extra depth

You can loop these either between the line and the leader, or between the leader and the tippet depending on what you need to accomplish.
They work well and you can easily adjust the length you need.
The casting is not pretty though

Quote:
If you go the sink tip route do you just have a separate reel or spool loaded with it so you can switch out? Finally does the recommendation change if it is a river/stream vs. a lake/pond?
As a somewhat general rule, sinktips are for moving water, fullsink in still water

Most people carry extra lines on spare spools. I find it easier to switch out reels myself

It's possible, but really more trouble than it's worth, to just switch lines if you use a loop2loop connection between the backing and the line.
You'll need your backing loop to be large enough to pass your whole line through in order to do this
Like I said....it's possible do this .....but it's a major pain in the @$$
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Old 11-08-2008, 10:46 AM
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Default Re: Fishing Deeper

Quote:
Originally Posted by txbevo View Post
I have a question regarding fishing deeper. I know it will depend on the situation, but is it better to fish weighted flies, add split shot/some form of weight or use a sinking tip line?
The problem with using a sinking line whether full or tip is how do you control the flies movement under the surface. In most cases we usually want a drag free drift on a nymph. With a sinking line you can't control the line getting hooked up on rocks, logs, weeds or other debris that can cause drag. This is one of the reasons high sticking is so popular, just the mono is in the water giving you a better drift. If you're using a floating line and a weighted nymph and not bouncing bottom, just add some split shot about a foot and a half to two feet up the leader from the fly and that will help it get down. Add the amount of shot needed to bounce bottom. If you're fishing streamers however, you want movement and a sink tip line works great and will get you down. Full sink lines are used mostly for stillwater fishing situations to get presentations to desired depths. A full sink line used for river purposes can bring your presentation out of your desired zone without you even knowing it by the line getting hooked up on the bottom and taking your fly for a ride.


Quote:
Originally Posted by txbevo View Post
Finally does the recommendation change if it is a river/stream vs. a lake/pond?
Two completely different styles of fishing. For lakes I rarely ever fish a sink tip. I do however use several different full sink lines. A slow sink line is useful when fishing shallow structures like shoals, weed beds and quick drop-offs from the shoreline. A medium sink line I use when fishing drop-offs or if the trout are holding in the middle of the water column. And a fast sink line to get presentations closer to the bottom in deeper water. A floating line can be used with a long enough leader to get you fly to it's desired depth. This method is usually used for pupa or larva midge patterns but can also be used for nymphs or leech patterns (catatonic style). For the inexperienced, a strike indicator will help you detect strikes and will float your patterns at the desired depth.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,
Doc
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