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-   -   Strike Indicator Slower than Current? (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/general-discussion/6750-strike-indicator-slower-than-current.html)

goodfortune 12-03-2008 05:55 PM

Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
I'm new to fly-fishing, and this is my first post here.

I fished last Saturday by drifting a 'bugger below an strike indicator, trying to keep it close to the bottom. During the drifts, I noticed that my indicator was drifting more slowly than the foam/suds on the surface of the water. I didn't remember seeing any "wakes" behind my indicator, and I tried to mend my line to prevent drag during each drift.

When dead-drifting a nymph or streamer below an indicator, and the indicator is drifts more slowly than the current, is this a problem in terms of drag? If so, how can I correct the problem, or prevent it from happening?

I look forward to your replies; thanks in advance!

jclampwork88 12-03-2008 06:04 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
First of all welcome to the forum.

Correct me if I am wrong, but it sounds like the current under the water is holding up your fly which in turn will hold up your strike indicator. Were you hitting the bottom at all? If so there would be some drag from that.

I wouldn't see a real problem with the slower drag of the indicator unless it was affecting the fly underneath it.

What was the currents like that day?

John

OldMan 12-03-2008 07:22 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
To be honest. I'm not sure why you're using an indicator with a streamer? If you do it's not important to get a good drift with it. The more action you can give it the better.

fyshstykr 12-04-2008 01:43 AM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
How long is the leader? and how deep is the water your fishing?

afishinado 12-04-2008 07:55 AM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
With few exceptions, the speed of the current is fastest near the surface, and slowest near the bottom, due to the friction of the water with the bottom. Most often, the goal when nymphing is to drift your fly near the bottom at the same speed as the naturals. Your fly and/or added weight allowed your fly to drift at the slower bottom current speed - usually a good thing, since it would match the speed of any natural insect drifting at that level. In other words "you done good!" Try to weight your fly and make a cast and mend with a goal of keeping your indicator floating at the same speed or slower than anything floating on the surface. It's then up to the fish to tell you if the drift is right. Good luck.

stuartr 12-04-2008 02:23 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
My guess is the bugger was ticking the bottom and slowing it down. I too fish buggers on a dead drift, I just don't use an indicator. I have just not often, I high stick or tight line them across and up stream. I hardly ever fish them like a streamer.

STU

goodfortune 12-04-2008 06:55 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
Thanks for the responses :). I'm am so new to fly-fishing that I don't know what to ask next. I haven't caught anything yet, but I am motivated to learn and improve.

As I remember, the current was between slow and moderate. I guessed that the water was about 18" - 24" (Maybe; I'm bad at gauging depth), so I placed the indicator about 30" from the fly. I was using a 7.5' 3x leader with the bugger, with about 1.5' - 2' of tippet tied to the leader. I made my drifts about 1.5 to 2 rod lengths out, if that detail helps.

The indicator drifted smoothly, so I'm guessing it didn't reach the bottom. So, I have a few more questions:
  • If you are not sure how deep the water you are fishing is, can you lengthen the distance between the fly and indicator on the leader, or will doing so raise my chances of being caught on the bottom?
  • Is finding the correct depth to fish a fly a matter of fly-to-indicator length, or how much weight put on the leader?
  • Oldman, how do you fish your Wooly Buggers? Everyone, feel free to describe you fish them as well.

Thanks again; I appreciate everyone's input.

jclampwork88 12-04-2008 07:10 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
If you are trying to get to the bottom, then it would be wise to lengthen the distance between the fly and strike indicator. I always go a little longer on the distance at first to make sure that I will hit bottom. If I don't get a snag once and a while on the rocks on the bottom, I know that I need to add length. I do this until I figure out what water column the fish are sitting in.

As far as weight or distance between the fly and strike indicator, I would have to say that it is a combo of both. More weight for faster current. More distance for still water.

John

OldMan 12-04-2008 08:03 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
A bugger is imitating something that swims. Minnow etc. So, it's not important for it to have a drag free drift like nymphs and dry flies. It needs to look alive and swimming.

There's many methods used to fish a streamer. All of them give lots of action to the fly. One of them is to cast up and across and stip it back to use as it works downstream. Giving it short jerks as you strip in.

You don't need to look for subtle takes with streams like you do with nymphs. A trout will hit a streamer pretty hard and it will be obvious when it happens.

stuartr 12-04-2008 09:20 PM

Re: Strike Indicator Slower than Current?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by OldMan (Post 40177)
A bugger is imitating something that swims. Minnow etc. So, it's not important for it to have a drag free drift like nymphs and dry flies. It needs to look alive and swimming.

There's many methods used to fish a streamer. All of them give lots of action to the fly. One of them is to cast up and across and stip it back to use as it works downstream. Giving it short jerks as you strip in.

You don't need to look for subtle takes with streams like you do with nymphs. A trout will hit a streamer pretty hard and it will be obvious when it happens.

Or is could imitating a crayfish, helgamite, or a big stonefly all critters that just sorta hang around on the bottom. I guess that is what I am doing by just letting the current move them and keeping a tight enough line to feel the strikes. I do it bass and trout fishing and has killed for both for me.

STU


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