The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > General Fly Fishing Discussion > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussions regarding fly fishing as a whole. Ask questions. Get answers...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 01-23-2009, 10:37 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Jefferson, MD
Posts: 21
doublelung2009 is on a distinguished road
Default Newbie Question about flies

Hey everyone. If this is answered somewhere else on this site, direct me to it if you would please. I am very new to fly fishing, and am trying to learn.

I am looking for basic information regarding the differences between dry flies, emergers, nymphs....what makes them float, what keeps them emerged just under the film, what makes them sink to the level you want them to be at.... Is it the hook, material, floatant...a combination of all these?

Also, is there somewhere I can go to view/ learn to visually tell the differences between different types of flys. I would like to start out with purchasing some, and while learning about the variations of each, get into tying my own. But I need to be able to identify them first.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-23-2009, 11:15 AM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 88
MontanaMoose will become famous soon enoughMontanaMoose will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Hello doublelung, I'm going to give you a way to go but if it isn't something you're into, I'm sure others will reply with better answers/info.

I tried google for your questions and in the search bar I typed 'What are dry flies?', 'What are emerger flies?' and 'What are nymph flies?'

It would prolly take a few weeks to read the approx. 750,000 hits, but the first few in each of the three categories returned some great results and answers. Hope this helps but again, I know others will have something better if this doesn't work for you.

Cheers,

MontanaMoose
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-23-2009, 12:04 PM
Super Moderator/Fly Swap Coordinator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,019
peregrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Doublelung,

Good question. Montana moose has given you great advice. You might also want to look at sites like www.orvis.com to get the visuals and names of some different types of flies by category.

This thread form the board might help a bit:

http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/fo...lies-7262.html

If you want, tell us what fish you'll be chasing, and we could probably suggest some basic patterns that would cover you from top to bottom. Then you can google the names to get a look at them. And when you get into tying, we can also suggest some easy but effective patterns to tie for your waters.

Good luck. Pattern names often won't give you a clue as to what they look like, but pretty soon you'll be able to just look at a pic and tell pretty easily what type it is.

peregrines
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-23-2009, 12:51 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Jefferson, MD
Posts: 21
doublelung2009 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Montana Moose / Peregrines

Thanks for the info. I'll do some searching based on both your replies.

I will mainly be fishing (at least for now) in my local waters in Central/Western MD and WV for trout. Might also get into some smallie fishing. If I get something like a 9' 5wt (which I presume is a good all around set up for a beginner) will I be able to fish for small mouth with that also? In general, what size leader/ tippett would I use for trout and small mouth?

Thanks again



Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrines View Post
Doublelung,

Good question. Montana moose has given you great advice. You might also want to look at sites like www.orvis.com to get the visuals and names of some different types of flies by category.

This thread form the board might help a bit:

http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/fo...lies-7262.html

If you want, tell us what fish you'll be chasing, and we could probably suggest some basic patterns that would cover you from top to bottom. Then you can google the names to get a look at them. And when you get into tying, we can also suggest some easy but effective patterns to tie for your waters.

Good luck. Pattern names often won't give you a clue as to what they look like, but pretty soon you'll be able to just look at a pic and tell pretty easily what type it is.

peregrines
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-23-2009, 01:59 PM
Super Moderator/Fly Swap Coordinator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,019
peregrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Doublelung

A local fly shop will be able to get you off to a good start, but this is a basic selection that would work anywhere, or at least put you in the game. There are a bazillion patterns and all kinds of local and personal favorites so everybody’s list of flies will probably be a bit different but here are about 10 patterns that would be a good start.

For trout:
Dry flies:

Parachute Adams 12, 14, 16, 18- This will imitate a lot of dark to medium shade mayflies and is good for slow to medium fast water. It’s good when there’s ahatch, or as a general searching fly.

Tan Elk Hair Caddis 14, 16 imitates a lot of Caddis, and is good for all water types. Also a good searching fly

Royal Wulff or Humpy 12, 14 These is are attractor patterns with a lot of hackle and float like a cork. Good for fast water

Nymphs, with bead heads:

Pheasant Tail Nymph 16, 18

Gold Ribbed Hare’s Ear 12, 14, 16

Wet fly

Soft Hackle like a Partridge and Orange (or yellow or green) size 16 A good searching fly, and also imitates emerging mayflies and caddis. Hard to fish it wrong.

Streamers

Bead Head Black Wooly Bugger size 8

Bead Head Olive Woolly Bugger size 8 These are both excellent flies for both trout and SM and LM bass. They are another fly that is hard to fish wrong, good for ripping through pools and runs, along undercut banks, and for lakes and ponds.

Smallies and largemouth:

Streamers:

Clouser Minnow chartreuse, white, black are all good so pick a couple. And if you have a lot of crayfish in your streams, brown over orange. The clouser is a weighted fly that rides hook point up. It dives and darts on the retrieve, and gets deep. If you are new to fly casting you might want to start out with clousers that are weighted with beadchain eyes instead of lead dumbbells. They’re easier to cast, but won’t get as deep. A killer pattern for bass, and easy to tie, using inexpensive materials (bucktail).

Black Marabou Muddler size 6 A big trout fly. Also good for bass. It’ll ride a little higher than the weighted buggers and clousers.

These would be a good selection to start. You can google the names, or search through a store site with good pics. These are all pretty common patterns. As the season progresses and warms up, you’ll want to ad other stuff--- grass hopper patterns for summer, maybe some poppers for bass, etc. But by then you’ll be well on your way.

As far as your other questions, a 5 weight would be a great all around choice for trout. But if you want to chase smallies with it too, I’m thinking a 6 might be a bit better to cast weighted flies, and poppers, as well as being a fine weight for trout. If you went with a 5 for trout now and wanted another rod for smallies down the road I would add a 7 for even a bit more oomph, but that’s starting to get a little on the heavy side for trout.

For leaders and tippets, you basically want to match the size of the tippet to the size (and weight or wind resistance) of the fly. To get a a good ball park idea you can take the hook size and divide by 3 to get a tippet X size. So a size 12 Adams divided by 3 = 4 X tippet. For heavily weighted flies like buggers and clousers, divide by 4, for a thicker leader to turn over the fly, so a size 8 woolly bugger would take a 2x tippet. So a couple of spools of tippet say 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X and 6X would be fine. I would get a 7 ½ foot leader to start, tapered down to 3X, and add around 2 feet of tippet, for an overall length of around 9-10 feet.

If you end up doing a lot of smaallie fishing, I’d add another 7 ½ foot leader tapered down to 1X. If you, or the guy at the shop, installs the leader using a short section of 30lb mono, say 6” long to the fly line, and a loop in the other end, you can quickly change from the trout leader to a heavier one for fishing heavy bigger flies and stronger tippets using a loop to loop connection. Bass generally aren’t as leader shy as trout, and a heavier leader/tippet will make casting big heavy stuff easier.

Hope this helps a bit.

peregrines
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-23-2009, 03:12 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 37
thirdyearff is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

check your PM's
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2009, 07:46 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Jefferson, MD
Posts: 21
doublelung2009 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Man that helps a lot!!

I got set up over the weekend. Got a 5/6wt, 9', 4pc with rod and reel case, fly box, a couple packs of leaders (4X and 5X; 7.5' and 9') , couple spools of tippet (can't remember what size, 3-4 various spools), 15 flies dry/wet/ some buggers, they put the backing and line on my reel too. Fly Fishing Benefactors is the manuf. Got the Dechutes II reel. Google it if you have a min. sometime and let me know what you think. Seems like a real good set up for me to start with for $200 for everything. My brother got one too. We were practicing casting yesterday afternoon.....a lot different than baitcasting and spinner fishing. Started to kind of get the hang of it after a while, but we were still only casting like 20' or so.

Now I have to go through my box and try to identify all my flies. But I have a good idea what most are....have been trying to read up a lot on them.

Thanks a lot for all the advice and info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrines View Post
Doublelung

A local fly shop will be able to get you off to a good start, but this is a basic selection that would work anywhere, or at least put you in the game. There are a bazillion patterns and all kinds of local and personal favorites so everybody’s list of flies will probably be a bit different but here are about 10 patterns that would be a good start.

For trout:
Dry flies:

Parachute Adams 12, 14, 16, 18- This will imitate a lot of dark to medium shade mayflies and is good for slow to medium fast water. It’s good when there’s ahatch, or as a general searching fly.

Tan Elk Hair Caddis 14, 16 imitates a lot of Caddis, and is good for all water types. Also a good searching fly

Royal Wulff or Humpy 12, 14 These is are attractor patterns with a lot of hackle and float like a cork. Good for fast water

Nymphs, with bead heads:

Pheasant Tail Nymph 16, 18

Gold Ribbed Hare’s Ear 12, 14, 16

Wet fly

Soft Hackle like a Partridge and Orange (or yellow or green) size 16 A good searching fly, and also imitates emerging mayflies and caddis. Hard to fish it wrong.

Streamers

Bead Head Black Wooly Bugger size 8

Bead Head Olive Woolly Bugger size 8 These are both excellent flies for both trout and SM and LM bass. They are another fly that is hard to fish wrong, good for ripping through pools and runs, along undercut banks, and for lakes and ponds.

Smallies and largemouth:

Streamers:

Clouser Minnow chartreuse, white, black are all good so pick a couple. And if you have a lot of crayfish in your streams, brown over orange. The clouser is a weighted fly that rides hook point up. It dives and darts on the retrieve, and gets deep. If you are new to fly casting you might want to start out with clousers that are weighted with beadchain eyes instead of lead dumbbells. They’re easier to cast, but won’t get as deep. A killer pattern for bass, and easy to tie, using inexpensive materials (bucktail).

Black Marabou Muddler size 6 A big trout fly. Also good for bass. It’ll ride a little higher than the weighted buggers and clousers.

These would be a good selection to start. You can google the names, or search through a store site with good pics. These are all pretty common patterns. As the season progresses and warms up, you’ll want to ad other stuff--- grass hopper patterns for summer, maybe some poppers for bass, etc. But by then you’ll be well on your way.

As far as your other questions, a 5 weight would be a great all around choice for trout. But if you want to chase smallies with it too, I’m thinking a 6 might be a bit better to cast weighted flies, and poppers, as well as being a fine weight for trout. If you went with a 5 for trout now and wanted another rod for smallies down the road I would add a 7 for even a bit more oomph, but that’s starting to get a little on the heavy side for trout.

For leaders and tippets, you basically want to match the size of the tippet to the size (and weight or wind resistance) of the fly. To get a a good ball park idea you can take the hook size and divide by 3 to get a tippet X size. So a size 12 Adams divided by 3 = 4 X tippet. For heavily weighted flies like buggers and clousers, divide by 4, for a thicker leader to turn over the fly, so a size 8 woolly bugger would take a 2x tippet. So a couple of spools of tippet say 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X and 6X would be fine. I would get a 7 ½ foot leader to start, tapered down to 3X, and add around 2 feet of tippet, for an overall length of around 9-10 feet.

If you end up doing a lot of smaallie fishing, I’d add another 7 ½ foot leader tapered down to 1X. If you, or the guy at the shop, installs the leader using a short section of 30lb mono, say 6” long to the fly line, and a loop in the other end, you can quickly change from the trout leader to a heavier one for fishing heavy bigger flies and stronger tippets using a loop to loop connection. Bass generally aren’t as leader shy as trout, and a heavier leader/tippet will make casting big heavy stuff easier.

Hope this helps a bit.

peregrines
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-26-2009, 09:01 AM
Super Moderator/Fly Swap Coordinator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,019
peregrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Doublelung-

Sounds like you and your Bro are off to a great start, that rod you picked out sounds like the San Juan? I haven't played with one, but it sounds like a nice rod, with plenty of backbone and a nice medium fast action.

Yeah, fly casting is a lot different than using a spinner or bait casting rod where you cast the weight of the lure -- the main difference is you're casting the weight of the line, and the fly since it weighs nothing just goes along for the ride.

If you've joined a local TU chapter or FFF affiliated club you'll be able to get a lot of help that will make learning a lot easier--- and help you get off to a good start without "hardwiring" in bad technique.... I'm self taught and started out without a clue--- practiced and practiced the same ugly stroke until it's now pretty well ingrained. Would have been a lot better off getting some help with casting right off the bat, so that practice would have been locking in good form rather than some variation of the "funky chicken".

You can find a couple good vids on the web to check out:

Google "tight lines Fly casting you tube" for a 3 part series on beginning fly casting

Another site is Sexyloops - the best fly fishing and fly casting instruction seven days a week which sounds like a porn site, but is actually a FF site, mostly devoted to fly casting, with free vids. Because of the name, don't look for it from work... it's liable to show up in IT reports if they do routine searches for pervs using standard software programs and could lead to an awkward conversation with HR.

There are also a ton of good casting DVDs-- look for names like Joan Wulff, Lefty Kreh, Gary Borger etc and ask here on the board for recommendations if your interested in any-- some might be available thru your library's interloan program or through NetFlix.

As far as practicing, tie a piece of yarn on the end as a "fly" it'll help keep your tippet or leader from shredding. And practice on grass- pavement will scuff up the finish on the line and reduce distance.

Take it easy, don't try to muscle through casts to get distance--- it's all about the timing-- wait on your back cast to let the line straighten out behind you (that whip crack sound means you're not waiting long enough), and have at it. It'll all come together even if it doesn't seem like it will. Remember this as you are looking at your fly caught 20 feet up in a tree branch.... it's all part of the process we all went thru... and still do from time to time. Just as an observation, most of the trout you catch, especially on small streams, will probably be within 20 feet of you, so you're already in the game.

Another good resource for you is Animated Knots by Grog This site walks through several knots used for a bunch of different things-- the Double Surgeons is a good one for attaching a short section of tippet to the leader.

If you have trouble identifying your flies, post a pic. Folks here could probably rattle them off for you.

Sounds like you're off to a great start, good luck!

peregrines
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2009, 08:14 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Jefferson, MD
Posts: 21
doublelung2009 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Yes it is the San Juan. I actually have been doing some digging and ordered (and watched most of) a fly fishing vid from Joan Wulff. "Dynamics of fly casting: from solid basics to advanced techniques". I dont know if you have ever seen this, but I certainly recommend it for beginners. (not implying youre a beginner, just a recommendation for beginners like myself) It is really easy to follow and gives good practice scenarios, but Ive only got to practice once so far....I also got "successful fly fishing strategies" by Gary Lafontaine....it's OK, more of "how to fish different patterns". I got "Handbook of hatches - foods trout eat most and flies to match them". It's really good also! Goes a little too far in depth sometimes regarding entomology, I feel, but it is a really good book to learn about different hatches and presentations.

I'll check out that site at home...lol...Ive been blocked too many times from searches related to weapons...they might get the wrong idea if I start getting blocked from "porn" sites too...

Anyway, thanks again for the help. Oh yeah, I already found the knot tying site by Grog also....even brought some tippet to work today to do some practicing (slow day).

One more question....they attached a loop to my flyline...sort of feed the hollow part of the loop line through the fly line and then put a dab of super glue on end of loop line to make sure the loop stayed on (maybe 3" or so feed up the fly line)....know what Im talking about? whats the best knot to tie the leader on with? I just tied an improved clinch for now to get some leader mat. on....but not sure if it's the best one.

Talk to you later on

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrines View Post
Doublelung-

Sounds like you and your Bro are off to a great start, that rod you picked out sounds like the San Juan? I haven't played with one, but it sounds like a nice rod, with plenty of backbone and a nice medium fast action.

Yeah, fly casting is a lot different than using a spinner or bait casting rod where you cast the weight of the lure -- the main difference is you're casting the weight of the line, and the fly since it weighs nothing just goes along for the ride.

If you've joined a local TU chapter or FFF affiliated club you'll be able to get a lot of help that will make learning a lot easier--- and help you get off to a good start without "hardwiring" in bad technique.... I'm self taught and started out without a clue--- practiced and practiced the same ugly stroke until it's now pretty well ingrained. Would have been a lot better off getting some help with casting right off the bat, so that practice would have been locking in good form rather than some variation of the "funky chicken".

You can find a couple good vids on the web to check out:

Google "tight lines Fly casting you tube" for a 3 part series on beginning fly casting

Another site is Sexyloops - the best fly fishing and fly casting instruction seven days a week which sounds like a porn site, but is actually a FF site, mostly devoted to fly casting, with free vids. Because of the name, don't look for it from work... it's liable to show up in IT reports if they do routine searches for pervs using standard software programs and could lead to an awkward conversation with HR.

There are also a ton of good casting DVDs-- look for names like Joan Wulff, Lefty Kreh, Gary Borger etc and ask here on the board for recommendations if your interested in any-- some might be available thru your library's interloan program or through NetFlix.

As far as practicing, tie a piece of yarn on the end as a "fly" it'll help keep your tippet or leader from shredding. And practice on grass- pavement will scuff up the finish on the line and reduce distance.

Take it easy, don't try to muscle through casts to get distance--- it's all about the timing-- wait on your back cast to let the line straighten out behind you (that whip crack sound means you're not waiting long enough), and have at it. It'll all come together even if it doesn't seem like it will. Remember this as you are looking at your fly caught 20 feet up in a tree branch.... it's all part of the process we all went thru... and still do from time to time. Just as an observation, most of the trout you catch, especially on small streams, will probably be within 20 feet of you, so you're already in the game.

Another good resource for you is Animated Knots by Grog This site walks through several knots used for a bunch of different things-- the Double Surgeons is a good one for attaching a short section of tippet to the leader.

If you have trouble identifying your flies, post a pic. Folks here could probably rattle them off for you.

Sounds like you're off to a great start, good luck!

peregrines
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-27-2009, 10:15 AM
Super Moderator/Fly Swap Coordinator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,019
peregrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Newbie Question about flies

Doublelung-

Excellent, you've got some great stuff there. First, the fly shop actually put on exactly what i was talking about on the end of your fly line. It'll make changing leaders very easy for switching back and forth from trout to smallies. For smallies you'll probably want one with a heavier, stiffer taper to use with larger and heavier weighted flies. You can tie the butt section of the leader onto the loop attached to the fly line, the way you did it, or you can tie a small loop in the butt section of each leader with a perfection loop. Attach the loops with a loop to loop connection:
Loop-to-Loop Connection

(note that there is a right way and a wrong way to do this--- you want it to end up looking like a square knot, not a "cutting knot")

This way, you can just undo the loop of a light leader for fishing dry flies, and loop on a heavier shorter one for fishing weighted stuff like woolly buggers if you're on a trout stream.

Your choice of DVD's was excellent. Joan Wulff is one of the legends of fly fishing--- and casting along with her husband, Lee Wulff, (deceased) who among many other accomplishments is credited with flies like the Wulff series (Royal Wulff etc). One of the most amazing things about watching Joan- now in her 80's and weighing 100 pounds soaking wet-- is her ability to cast effortlessly--- proving that it's timing and technique- not muscle and power.

As far as flies go, your shop probably picked out a very good assortment of different patterns. In most cases your ability to read the water, get the fly where you want it, and get a good presentation with a 'drag free drift" will trump selection of the "perfect pattern". If there is a hatch going on, if you can match the size or a bit smaller of the naturals with an Adams (for mayflies) or Elk Hair Caddis (for caddis) you'll be in the game. Nymphs like the Pheasant Tail (for slim body mayfly nymphs) and the Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear (for fat bodied mayfly nymphs), wet flies like the Partridge and Orange (emerging mayflies and caddis), and woolly buggers (large stonefly and mayfly nymphs, minnows, leeches), Stimulators (large caddis and medium size stoneflies) do a pretty good job of giving an impressionistic match to many of the naturals you may run into during your hatches as well as being good searching flies when nothing is going on.

Some good resources (free, short and easy reads) on the basics:

Fly Fishing, Fly-Fishing Gear, Tips and News - MidCurrent is a site with a lot of informative articles. Here’s a link to a selection of articles on techniques. I highly recommend the ones on “Mendiing” and “Reading the Water” but the site is a good one to browse:
Fly Fishing Techniques, Fly Fishing Tips - MidCurrent

Fly Fishing | Westfly is a site that is primarily focused on the Pacific North West, but it also has some excellent articles. Scattered among the book reviews etc, there are some very good ones on “Dry Fly Presentations Part 1 and 2” and “Presenting Wet Flies Part 1 and 2”
Feature Article | Westfly

As you get more and more into it, you may also want to get deeper into specific hatches, and you can get as deep into it as you want with "bugology" and Latin names etc. Sites like Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout have a ton of info and pics of the naturals that can really up your game, but it's a lot of info to digest, and in terms of bang for the buck, you'd probably be better off at this point concentrating on the basics of casting, reading water and presentation.

As you get into it, and we start approaching some of the major hatches-- probably starting in April in PA and WV just holler. You'll get tons of advice on stuff like specific patterns, time of day to expect emergence, where in the stream to look for different hatches (riffles, slow water) etc etc. At this point you'll be adding specific knowledge to basic skills--- and the fish will truly fear you.

peregrines

PS With a name like "doublelung" i imagine you have plenty of fly tying material, so that might be something to take up too.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
foam popper kerryssz Share Patterns 10 03-12-2009 07:58 AM
Hawaii Oio (bonefish) Stan Wright Saltwater Fly Fishing 0 04-18-2007 02:57 AM
Happy Birthday to Thumper42 on 10-19-2006 Fish Bones The Lodge Den 0 10-19-2006 02:25 AM
Stripers by Kayak - by Casey Smartt Fish Bones Warmwater Articles 1 08-11-2005 03:23 AM
Arkansas River Report 6/17/05 - Salida, Colorado Fish Bones Rocky Mountain Range 1 06-21-2005 07:58 AM













All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.