The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > General Fly Fishing Discussion > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussions regarding fly fishing as a whole. Ask questions. Get answers...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 05:09 AM
jcw355's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 880
jcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nice
Default Getting started

I'm going to take up fly tying and have decided on a peak vise, my question to all of you experienced fly tying people is which tools are best? I would rather learn from your all experience as to what tools are best to buy right off and not have to upgrade later. Thanks in advance.
__________________
Okiemountaineer
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 09:03 AM
FrankB2's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,760
FrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond reputeFrankB2 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Getting started

Tools that tyers use include scissors, bobbins, and everything else. Don't skimp on those two, and you'll be happy. Dr. Slick scissors are great, and I like Griffin bobbins with ceramic inserts. While most whip finishing tools are fine, I like Griffin's tool. I also use an adjustable Griffin hair stacker. I use dental floss threaders to thread my bobbins:
Click the image to open in full size.
I used to open a bottle of head cement, dip a needle into it, and then transfer the drop to the threads on a finished fly. That's awkward, smelly, and not very efficient. You can buy a small squeeze bottle from Orvis and other suppliers that does a much better job:
Click the image to open in full size.

P.S. You can save yourself some headaches now by buying a directional lamp and magnifying lens. I use a very cheap lamp with a halogen bulb, but it's small and I can get it close to the fly without bumping into it. I use a Peak magnifying lens on my Peak vise, but good luck finding it on Peak's website. I like to have a lens and light that are separate, as that allows me to get the lens out of the way for larger flies, and also to direct the light angle any way I'd like without effecting the lens position.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 09:38 AM
ant's Avatar
ant ant is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Berks, PA
Posts: 936
Blog Entries: 1
ant is a splendid one to beholdant is a splendid one to beholdant is a splendid one to beholdant is a splendid one to beholdant is a splendid one to beholdant is a splendid one to beholdant is a splendid one to behold
Default Re: Getting started

Dr Slick's are very nice, but honestly I still use the same crappy tools that came with my starter set. I did upgrade the bobbin to a ceramic so I didn't have any more burs cutting my thread. The only other tool that I think I would need to upgrade are the scissors.

As for the magnifying lens, I recently bought one at Lowes. It's a floor model, which I like because when I don't want it I just roll it out of the way and don't need to worry about it cluttering up my desk. It's also on sale right now on their website.

Portfolio Magnifying Lens
__________________
Anthony Laurence
www.anthonylaurence.net
Web Developement and Design
FlyFishinado - My Fly Fishing Blog
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 09:46 AM
HuronRiverDan's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Monroe, Michigan
Posts: 2,584
HuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant future
Send a message via Yahoo to HuronRiverDan
Default Re: Getting started

For scissors, check out the selections at a craft store; they work as well as Dr.Slicks at a lower price. Ceramic bobbins are great, start out with one or two of them and you can't go wrong...As far as head cement goes, I quit using it entirely, I just do a double whip finish. If I do tye something that needs a finished head I use Sally Hansens HAN. Have fun, but don't say you weren't warned; Fly Tying is an Addiction...

Dan
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 10:16 AM
Rip Tide's Avatar
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: quiet corner, ct
Posts: 5,710
Rip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Getting started

Quote:
Originally Posted by HuronRiverDan View Post
For scissors, check out the selections at a craft store; they work as well as Dr.Slicks at a lower price.
Yup, that's what I use, scissors from the fabric store

Not that anyone else would want to try this, but I've recently gone very old school and started tying without a bobbin.
Back in the day they used a rubber button, but I have a faucet washer screwed to the edge of my desk.
Using the thread right off the spool, when I need to maintain tension, I'll just trap the thread between the rubber washer and the desk
__________________
The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 11:16 AM
bjweller's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Aurora, Colorado
Posts: 127
bjweller has a spectacular aura aboutbjweller has a spectacular aura about
Default Re: Getting started

I agree about the Dr. Slick tools, especially the scissors. Also, find a guy at your local fly shop and get him to teach you how to use the whip finish tool. It's a little tricky, especially if you try to learn from the internet. I had a guy show me one little thing I was doing wrong and my flies are much more solid now. Good luck--and remember fly tying should be fun, and your flies don't have to look as pristine as those in the shop to catch fish.
__________________
Moose

"There comes a time in every man's life when he is either going to go fishing or do something worse."

-Havilah Babcock
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 11:25 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Poulsbo, WA
Posts: 49
Ian Mann 4 will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Getting started

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcw355 View Post
I'm going to take up fly tying and have decided on a peak vise, my question to all of you experienced fly tying people is which tools are best? I would rather learn from your all experience as to what tools are best to buy right off and not have to upgrade later. Thanks in advance.
I would advise against going high end until you know for sure flytying is for you. On the flip side, I wouldn't get the cheapest out there either. Stick with the quality and pricepoint like your Peak vice...not the best but a good value.

Once you get into things, you'll find a lot more stuff to spend your money on. I would say that flies are better if you buy highest quality material for the tie rather than highest quality tools.

The other thing is that the most expensive tool may not be THE tool for you. I think the highest priced line of tool is probably Wasatch (please correct me if I am wrong) but you may like the feel of say a Rite bobbin.

Good luck and be sure to post up your flies when you start tying.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2010, 03:13 PM
Super Moderator/Fly Swap Coordinator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,019
peregrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Getting started

jcw-

Congrats and welcome to tying. You're off to a great start with the Peak-- a lot of folks on the forum rave about it. Assuming you're tying stuff like trout flies you'd probably want the following tools:

Bobbin (decent = metal tube Griffin $7, better= ceramic tube Griffin $13 and more expensive ones from Dr Slick, Tiemco, Matarelli, Wasaatch, etc $18 and up)
3 1/2" or 4" long Scissors with fine point (decent = fine point needle point imported scissors, make sure tips line up, better = Dr Slick $13-20)
Whip finisher (decent = Matarelli style imported whip finisher ($6-7), better = genuine Matarelli whip finisher $18) you should learn how to whip by hand without a tool also, but a tool is very helpful.
Bodkin- any import $2
Bobbin threader - any import $2
English style hackle Pliers- any import $2
Hair stacker- decent aluminum or plastic $6-7, better ( less static electricity buildup) = brass $12

You could buy tools individually, or get a Dr Slick Toolkit (for around $50-60, so shop around for best price) which contains all of the above and is very decent.


http://www.drslick.com/products_2009/gift_sets/tyer.jpg

As you get into it I'm sure you'll have tons of questions--- especially about materials so feel free to ask and check out the fly tying forum here and fly tying faq section --

You might also check around to see if any local shops or FF clubs have tying classes--- this is a good time of year for tying classes since many folks will be suffering from cabin fever. Classes are a great way to learn a ton and get off to a good start, and most tying classes are pretty reasonable in terms of cost.
__________________
Mark
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2011, 01:22 AM
jcw355's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 880
jcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nice
Default Re: Getting started

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrines View Post
jcw-

Congrats and welcome to tying. You're off to a great start with the Peak-- a lot of folks on the forum rave about it. Assuming you're tying stuff like trout flies you'd probably want the following tools:

Bobbin (decent = metal tube Griffin $7, better= ceramic tube Griffin $13 and more expensive ones from Dr Slick, Tiemco, Matarelli, Wasaatch, etc $18 and up)
3 1/2" or 4" long Scissors with fine point (decent = fine point needle point imported scissors, make sure tips line up, better = Dr Slick $13-20)
Whip finisher (decent = Matarelli style imported whip finisher ($6-7), better = genuine Matarelli whip finisher $18) you should learn how to whip by hand without a tool also, but a tool is very helpful.
Bodkin- any import $2
Bobbin threader - any import $2
English style hackle Pliers- any import $2
Hair stacker- decent aluminum or plastic $6-7, better ( less static electricity buildup) = brass $12

You could buy tools individually, or get a Dr Slick Toolkit (for around $50-60, so shop around for best price) which contains all of the above and is very decent.


http://www.drslick.com/products_2009/gift_sets/tyer.jpg

As you get into it I'm sure you'll have tons of questions--- especially about materials so feel free to ask and check out the fly tying forum here and fly tying faq section --

You might also check around to see if any local shops or FF clubs have tying classes--- this is a good time of year for tying classes since many folks will be suffering from cabin fever. Classes are a great way to learn a ton and get off to a good start, and most tying classes are pretty reasonable in terms of cost.
I appreciate everyones input, this post is the kind of info I was looking for. I know certain tools will do a job better and want to get those (ceramic tubed bobbin). Been reading info from this and other forums trying to learn something.
__________________
Okiemountaineer
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2011, 08:12 PM
jcw355's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 880
jcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nicejcw355 is just really nice
Default Re: Getting started

I went with the Apex Anvil vise instead of the Peak, nothing against the peak because that is what I wanted, just to get farther with what dollars I could spend. Had to drop some cash on something else just last week so the fly tying funds were robbed.
__________________
Okiemountaineer
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The rod that started it all Sasha Coldwater Fly Fishing 11 09-10-2010 09:20 PM
Getting Started? jsmrider General Fly Tying Discussions 3 04-10-2010 06:13 PM
getting started deon General Fly Tying Discussions 3 10-26-2009 04:27 PM
It all started with a 13-inch rainbow trout. It all started with a 13-inch rainbow tr Fish Bones The Daily Papers 0 12-13-2008 11:40 PM
Getting started googoo The Lodge Den 3 10-24-2007 08:46 PM













All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.