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Old 04-19-2007, 04:38 PM
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Default Weight question

Going to tie my first fly tonight!

I'm sure there is no simple answer to this but at what point does a fly become too heavy to easily cast and what exactly will be the problem? Tailing loop?

I've found that I am leaning towards a type of mini-bugger with eyes from my initial experience with panfish and largemouth. I'm starting with size 8 and 12 hooks. I should be able to easily weight this to get it down 6 feet or so. I'm sticking with my 6x floating weight forward line.

Any advice to get me started would be great.

Oh, my fishing trip this weekend was canceled due to septic problems at the cabin!
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:42 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

The phenomena caused by a fly that is too heavy can better be described as the "trailing thump" instead of a tailing loop- meaning, you run the risk of getting thumped in the back of the head by a fly that doesn't want to stay as high in the air. You also run greater risk of snapping it off your leader. (don't use 4x if you put lead eyes on it)

A lead eyed fly is actually a little heavier than I would recommend casting on a 6wt, unless they are very small eyes. I think you'd be better off with a beadhead bugger, and then add split shot to your leader if you need more weight to get it down. Having the weight spread around instead of all in one place should make it less jerky while casting. Going that route will also make your flies easier and faster to tie, and a bit more versatile.

(By the way, 6x refers to a size of tippet, so referring to a 6 weight rod that way could throw some people off.)
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Old 04-20-2007, 03:14 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

Sorry Cliff, but to me a big gun is a 6wt. It is what I use on any fish I know is over the 24" mark including Carp and Wipers.
I do throw big old lead eye flies with a 6wt just fine, but it depends on the rod action. You will have to slow your cast down and even try casting slightly to the side to avoid body contact.
I am going to add, that sometimes there is no getting around weighted flies, but personally I prefer NO weight and let the line put the fly where it needs to be.
An expensive way to go about it cause the lines are around $60. each, but I have Intermediate, Type II, Type III, Type V and a Type VII along with a 250 grain Depth Charge.
Man can not fly fish with a floating line only, well, he can, but there will come a time you will need a sinking line to get to the big ones on the bottom.
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Old 04-20-2007, 11:03 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

For now, I am just trying to reproduce some of the flies I have had luck with so far while pretty much only varying color. I am curious about weight because I was surprised at the size of fish I was catching with the relatively small fly I was using. Normally with spinning gear and a jig that small, I would only catch small bluegill. I now realize that even with floating line, I am able to better control the depth of the fly. I really want to stick with floating line for now and I have seen that a weighted fly will sink the length of the leader plus a small portion of the fly line. I prefer to fish points that are around 10' deep where I live. I want to be able to keep the the fly active with some depth which is primarily dependant on weight and speed of retrieval with a floating line. I understand that sinking lines are designed to do this but I simply don't have the skill yet to fish a sinking line while trying to position my kayak on a point with a breeze.

I think it's going to come down to what I can cast but I definitely will start with lighter weight.
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Old 04-23-2007, 12:56 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

Here's another option to turn a floating line into a sink tip. PolyLeaders For your purposes, I would go with the "fast sinking" speed which is actually the middle sink rate of what they offer. Your fly will still sink faster than your line/leader, but the sinking leader will create a much straighter connection from the fly to your rod, and thus should make feeling strikes and setting the hook much easier.

If you decide to go with this set-up, be aware that you will need to cast a bit differently, as your fly line will now be a bit heavier than a 6wt. It will behave more like a shooting head, so reading up on casting those could be helpful.
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Old 04-23-2007, 01:02 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

I'm catching crappie in 1-3' of water right now but I have a trip planned to the Ozarks in mid may. They will have probably returned to deeper water by then and the sinking leader may be useful. Thanks!
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Old 04-23-2007, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

I forgot all about those. I use to use them all the time. The ones I used are about 5' long and they are float, Intermediate then all the different sink rates and they do work. You can get a whole kit or singles from Cabela's. They are much easier to cast them a bunch of splitshot.
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Old 04-25-2007, 01:18 PM
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Default Re: Weight question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joni View Post
Sorry Cliff, but to me a big gun is a 6wt. It is what I use on any fish I know is over the 24" mark including Carp and Wipers.
I do throw big old lead eye flies with a 6wt just fine, but it depends on the rod action. You will have to slow your cast down and even try casting slightly to the side to avoid body contact.
I am going to add, that sometimes there is no getting around weighted flies, but personally I prefer NO weight and let the line put the fly where it needs to be.
An expensive way to go about it cause the lines are around $60. each, but I have Intermediate, Type II, Type III, Type V and a Type VII along with a 250 grain Depth Charge.
Man can not fly fish with a floating line only, well, he can, but there will come a time you will need a sinking line to get to the big ones on the bottom.
Totally agree with the sinking lines. I didn't start to catch the big boys out west until I started using one.
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