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Old 11-25-2009, 11:21 AM
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Default Wisconsin Driftless Area Tiger Trout

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Written by: Len Harris
Photos by: Len Harris

The tiger trout is a sterile hybrid cross between a female brown trout and a male brook trout. The fish exhibits unusual markings found in neither parent. Tiger trout are rare in the wild, appearing only in areas where brook and brown trout share spawning grounds. Stream born tigers take on the appearance of their fathers (brook trout) Hatchery tigers look more like their mothers (brown trout).

Wisconsin has NO stocking program and ALL tigers caught in Wisconsin streams are "Natural" tigers.

This interspecies cross is unusual, in part because each fish belongs to a separate genus (Salvelinus for brook trout and Salmo for browns). It happens rarely in the wild, but can be (and is) easily performed by fisheries biologists or hatchery technicians.

This wild (non-hatchery) tiger trout was caught in Southwestern Wisconsin by angler Kevin Searock. A typical tiger caught in the wild are 4 to 16 inches. *below*
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Tigers are pretty fish. The normal vermiculations (wormlike markings) found on the backs of most brookies become enlarged and often contorted into stripes (hence the name 'tiger'), swirls, spots, and rings. The trout also exhibit a greenish cast, which lets you know, when you hook one, that there is something different on the end of your line long before the fish is in hand.
Click the image to open in full size.

Naturally-occuring tiger trout generally appear only in streams that have higher brook trout than brown trout populations. And while they don't appear often, they are becoming more commonly found in the Midwest and New England.



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Old 02-02-2011, 07:39 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin Driftless Area Tiger Trout

Those are some stunningly gorgeous Trout! I have never witnessed a Tiger. they are very uncommon in the U.P. where I fish. I have always wanted to haul one in and inspect it. I won't ask the river of course, but how frequently do you find them? Our chances of catching them in the Upper Peninsula is beyond rare.
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Old 02-02-2011, 11:18 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin Driftless Area Tiger Trout

Len: Great post, I love the looks of Tiger Trout, and the photos you posted are fantastic!

Larry
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Old 02-03-2011, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin Driftless Area Tiger Trout

Tiger are really rare

to add rare......

three of my best brook trout streams had a significant gill lice problem and a large percent of the brook trout population was lost.

Tigers were rare but now in southwestern wisconsin they are even more than rare.
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