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Old 10-25-2012, 05:28 PM
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Default Re: rod comparisons

+1 for the Loomis GL3 14' 8/9. I have one and it cast a 550 gr Skagit with tips like a rocket launcher.

It's for sale here in the classifieds with a Ross CLA 6 and RIO Skagit line at a reasonable price. Pics available upon request, pm me your email address and I'll get them to you right away if interested.
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Old 10-28-2012, 03:15 PM
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Default Re: rod comparisons

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSuibhne View Post
I get the impression from it that it requires less distance behind you than Scandi
The Skagit style and Scandi are both bottom hand casts. They are the same other than Skagit is for casting heavy, short heads and bigger flies. Skagit needs a more sustained anchor type setup, but the cast itself, is just a scandi cast. Both are bottom hand styles. Scandi casting was developed for places where you have less room behind you. In reallity, Skagit is an offshoot of Scandi. Neither require much room behind you, but that being said.... The style I like has slower rods, longer top grips, longer heads and the top hand does the bulk of the work. Here is a video of Eoin Fairgrieve in Scotland casting the style I do. Top hand. He's using a pretty long head here, and still you can see that even casting almost straight across the river, (keep in mind how the camera makes this look, I don't think the D loop makes it over dry land) he does not need a lot of room. I have 15' rods that if I cast even at a 60 degree angle across the river, I can do it without waders and almost flat against trees on the bank. If you look at the last cast he does, you can see there are trees right behind him and this is the style you need the most room for. So by saying one style needs more or less, you need to keep in mind, none of them need a lot. Where I see the advantage of Scandi is, you need very little room, but not by much. In Skagit you can chuck a heavy head and rip a half a chicken out of the water. In more traditional top hand casting you can still cast in tight spots and chuck a pretty good sized fly, I have Pike fished this way, but you can get more distance than Skagit or Scandi. When you look at the distance competitions, you won't see any (I don't believe) bottom hand casts.

I used this video, among others to learn spey casting from. I never get tired of this one. The next one is of Gordon Armstrong who did a 222' cast. I recently found out they auctioned off the rod he did it with to raise money for some charity. It went for about a thousand pounds. Had I known ahead of time I would like to have tried to win that rod. Dang, timing is everything. He used a Carron Jetstream long belly line to do it. You need a bit more room behind you for those.


As I have said, where I fish is very big water. According to my map, it's 1026 feet across the river at my favorite spot. My best structure is 140 feet out. It's 17 feet deep there. Last Fall a 180' cast would not have been to far. This is why I use what I use. You need to be sure that what you pick, no matter what it is, will be right for the places you fish and the flies you will use. Two hand rods as I have said in the past are just the delivery system for the fly. Decide what fly and where it needs to be delivered to, and base your purchase on that.
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Old 10-30-2012, 06:39 AM
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Default Re: rod comparisons

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradyb View Post
This is not true. Any of the two handed styles can be used in a situation without room behind you.

Keep in mind Ed is using GLX Loomis' in those videos, not the GL3 you're looking at. I've read reports of that GL3 rod being a nice rod,..and also a total dog. You should cast it first if possible.
Actually you are false in some ways...

The longer the head, the longer your d-loop "reaches out" behind you all things being equal...

The one exception would be true underhand casting with scandi heads as you are then casting at such an angle downstream, your dloop reaches out more upstream of you than behind you, but in cases of Winter steelhead and King fishing, this is not going to be your best method, much better to allow the fly to fish "sideways" in the current than facing dead upstream as this casting method would present the fly...

Mid-spey and long belly lines will require more room behind you than say a skagit head...

---------- Post added at 08:36 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:34 AM ----------

---------- Post added at 08:39 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:36 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradyb View Post
Ed is certainly a great caster, but most claims that a certain thing can only be done with certain line system are false. Be it skagit, scandi, modern, or traditional,....an anchor can always be set out in front of you rather than behind you. If you live near a shop I would really recommend getting there to cast as many rods as you can to see what feels best to you.
Changing where your anchor is placed, changes what angle you are going to be able to cast at though, so if you want to cast more across stream as you often would want to do in situations where getting deep and fishing slower are needed "Winter steelhead & King Salmon" your theory isn't quite right...
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Old 10-30-2012, 08:47 AM
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Default Re: rod comparisons

Well, it's not a theory. If it was I wouldn't have posted it. And I'm not going to get in an argument about what you need a skagit line to do. People were casting across stream with brush directly behind them before the Skagit river was called the Skagit river.
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Old 10-30-2012, 08:51 AM
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Default Re: rod comparisons

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradyb View Post
Well, it's not a theory. If it was I wouldn't have posted it. And I'm not going to get in an argument about what you need a skagit line to do. People were casting across stream with brush directly behind them before the Skagit river was called the Skagit river.

That doesn't change the fact that the longer the line, the further back your d loop is going to reach out, that is a fact, not a theory...

Sure, you can change the placement of your anchor to allow a longer line to be cast without reaching back so far, but then you take away your ability to cast more across stream, which in regards to Winter steelhead, will no doubt hurt the effectiveness of your presentation...

It's a large part of why Goran Andersson designed what is commonly called a scandi head and why a skagit head was eventually designed obviously that was not the only reason for the development of these lines, but definitely part of it...

Not trying to argue, but just stating a fact as to not have newbies confused...
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