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-   -   Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/mid-atlantic-area/99664-black-olive-wooly-bugger-representation.html)

colter 02-02-2011 11:56 AM

Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
Does anyone know what a black and olive woolly bugger is supposed to look like to a trout? With or without a bead? I have had good luck with them, but I don't know what they represent. Also, to keep dry flies afloat nicely i have been using a spray, but I saw a man putting his fly in a container and shaking it to dry it. It seems like there wouldn't be as much as an oily mess, so does anyone know what it is or where I could get one? I would appreciate the help.

fishngolf16 02-02-2011 02:17 PM

Re: Black and Olive Woolly Bugger Representation
 
The dry shake is a very good way to get small flies to float without adding weight and goo. The following is a link to fly fish USA and the shake is called Shimazaki Dry Shake. Dry Fly Floatant There are a few different brands and I have not seen a huge difference in any of them.

My opinion on the woolly buggers is that they mimic a few different things to some extent, such as, leaches and small prey fish. The real reason I believe would be more territorial or instinctive, attack foreign objects that intrude upon their world.

MoscaPescador 02-02-2011 03:20 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
If I recall correctly, Gary Soucie wrote a book called Woolly Wisdom. It discusses the bugger. Originally it was designed by Russell Blessing to mimic a Dobson Fly (Hellgramite). Tied in various colors, it can represent anything. Soucie also wrote that the bugger is a variation of a palmered fly that dates clearly before any of us were born.

I am not sure, but I think that the black with olive was the original Blessing color that mimiced the Dobson Fly.

MP

rangerrich99 02-02-2011 03:28 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
According to a book I read, WBs are an attractor pattern. They can represent baitfish, leeches, stonefly nymphs, crayfish, etc., depending on size, color, and how you fish them. IMO, the beadhead does two things: it allows for a quicker sink rate (sometimes a good thing), and it creates flash.

Jimmie 02-02-2011 03:45 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
What MP said. I've read where the Black/Olive Body is the original color of a WB.
Recently we had a presenter show us his different color combos to mimic sculpin; leeches; snails; crayfish; plus many colors of baitfish. His baitfish usually had multi colored tails (light on bottom to darker on top).

sandfly 02-02-2011 06:16 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
Pa. is loaded with hellgramite's in trout streams. Russell Blessing designed the bugger as a imitation of it. I remember when it was a secret amoung a select few...

colter 02-02-2011 06:40 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
I appreciate this advice, I wanted to know what to look for in a stream to see if it would be appropriate to use the woolly bugger. I think this is some pretty good advice..

ChrisinselwynNZ 02-03-2011 01:13 AM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colter (Post 203072)
Does anyone know what a black and olive woolly bugger is supposed to look like to a trout? With or without a bead? I have had good luck with them, but I don't know what they represent. Also, to keep dry flies afloat nicely i have been using a spray, but I saw a man putting his fly in a container and shaking it to dry it. It seems like there wouldn't be as much as an oily mess, so does anyone know what it is or where I could get one? I would appreciate the help.

Try gink for floatant, you put a dab on your fingers rub them together, and use your fingers to apply to the fly

the container may have been silica gel (or similar desicant) or an older style of floatant but this leaves an oily film on the water

I think that wooly buggers represent food, they have plenty of movement, have a wee bit of flash and a plump body trout love an easy meal:)

Chris

diamond rush 02-03-2011 03:06 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colter (Post 203072)
Also, to keep dry flies afloat nicely i have been using a spray, but I saw a man putting his fly in a container and shaking it to dry it. It seems like there wouldn't be as much as an oily mess, so does anyone know what it is or where I could get one? I would appreciate the help.

In his book Trout, Ray Bergman describes dissolving candle wax in an organic solvent and then putting it in a small container like you describe. Dipping a dry fly still on the line into the container and shaking would wash the fly and deposit trace amounts of wax, helping it float. The solvent would wash off the fly and then evaporate very quickly leaving a dry, clean fly.

If you decide to do this, don't follow his instructions on which solvents to use. He recommends in order, phenol, benzene, and gasoline. Phenol and benzene are dangerous carcinogenic chemicals. Gas might work, but would smell terrible. I'd recommend isopropyl alcohol.

Pocono 02-03-2011 09:36 PM

Re: Black and Olive Wooly Bugger Representation
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colter (Post 203072)
Does anyone know what a black and olive woolly bugger is supposed to look like to a trout? With or without a bead? I have had good luck with them, but I don't know what they represent. Also, to keep dry flies afloat nicely i have been using a spray, but I saw a man putting his fly in a container and shaking it to dry it. It seems like there wouldn't be as much as an oily mess, so does anyone know what it is or where I could get one? I would appreciate the help.

It may actually have been powdered CDC; which works well for a few casts and retrievals. That ususally comes in a container that you shake. It's usually whitish in color. If you shake the fly well after coating it, it really doesn't change the color of the fly that much.

Pocono


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