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nyquil 04-19-2009 03:53 AM

I'm near Boston
 
Hi guys,

I used to fish with non-fly rods at the local suburban ponds and lakes like white pond, walden pond, etc and usually catching bass, sunfish, and carps... but ever since a friend told me about the salmon season in Michigan and how he catches and eats the fish he catches (trout, salmon) I've been really interested in getting into fly fishing myself, and concentrate on catching fish that I can possibly consume... however, are there any fish or waters in massachusetts, or even, NH, MAINE that are safe to eat?

I did a brief google search online and it seems like most of the freshwater fish in massachusetts are not fit for consumption due to mercury build up in them =\

Although, i think the stocked fish are safer because they dont have as much mercury exposures?

Anyway, would love to hear what you guys think.

And could anyone recommend a good fly rod/setup?

Rip Tide 04-20-2009 10:26 AM

Re: I'm near Boston
 
We have the same issues here in CT.
The state recommends limiting consumption of most fresh water and larger SW fish to once a week. The high risk group (pregnant or nursing women and children under 6) have stricter limits.
Ponds and streams where it is not safe to eat the fish are clearly marked and publicized.
Trout for the most part are always safe because the majority are stocked and wild fish live in the cleanest of water.
There are exceptions though, the Housatonic River in western CT and in Mass below Stockbridge contains PCBs and is C&R for the most of the full length of the river

....I don't think that you'd want to be eating catfish or carp from the Charles though
Mostly because of the nasty taste rather than from any kind of contamination

Rip Tide 04-20-2009 02:37 PM

Re: I'm near Boston
 
As for the rod and reel.. that has a lot to do with how much you'd like to spend

Most people agree that the Scientific Anglers combo that they sell at Walmart, among other places. is pretty good quality for little payout.
You could find a better selection to choose from at the Bass Pro Shop in Foxboro.
For some better quality gear, go look at what they have at LL Bean or at Bear's Den in Taunton

paulm 04-20-2009 03:38 PM

Re: I'm near Boston
 
Rip tide is right, the badly polluted water is VERY WELL marked, but lots of the other cold water streams are passable for a meal now and again.

The stocked fish are, of course, safe. The Hatcheries use clean filtered water, but then the fish are a bit dumb and lacking a bit in taste from a diet of fish meal.

My own preference is for eating Brook Trout, since they demand the cleanest and coldest water, followed by Rainbow trout. Brown Trout can handle warmer water and are sometimes found with Small Mouthed Bass making them a questionable food source for me.

For small streams and rivers, I would suggest a "glass rod" as this will better handle short casts in tight places. Also a short rod is easier to handle in brushy areas. I like a 7 foot moderate action. For a reel, I would go with the least expensive one you can find. Unless you are planning on finding record size trout, LOL, you do not need a fancy drag nor very much backing.

These are my own views, and I hope they help.

nyquil 04-21-2009 12:28 AM

Re: I'm near Boston
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by paulm (Post 57298)
Rip tide is right, the badly polluted water is VERY WELL marked, but lots of the other cold water streams are passable for a meal now and again.

The stocked fish are, of course, safe. The Hatcheries use clean filtered water, but then the fish are a bit dumb and lacking a bit in taste from a diet of fish meal.

My own preference is for eating Brook Trout, since they demand the cleanest and coldest water, followed by Rainbow trout. Brown Trout can handle warmer water and are sometimes found with Small Mouthed Bass making them a questionable food source for me.

For small streams and rivers, I would suggest a "glass rod" as this will better handle short casts in tight places. Also a short rod is easier to handle in brushy areas. I like a 7 foot moderate action. For a reel, I would go with the least expensive one you can find. Unless you are planning on finding record size trout, LOL, you do not need a fancy drag nor very much backing.

These are my own views, and I hope they help.

Where do you fish for trouts ? i'm in belmont, mass, but i do have a car, so unless the location is really out of my way, then i should be able to give it a try.

peregrines 04-21-2009 10:16 AM

Re: I'm near Boston
 
This link might help. It's got links to where to go, stocking schedule, and fish consumption advisories.

MassWildlife - Fishing Information

I don't know that fly fishing is going to be the most cost effective way to get fish to eat.... but don't let that stop you!

There's a lot of other stuff to fly fish for too--- when I was a kid i used to live in Newton and used to fish in Lake Cochituate (sp?) in Natick (stocked trout bass, panfish), Walden Pond (stocked Trout) the Charles River (bass, crappie, panfish) and rivers like the Palmer for shad (should be running now or very soon), as well as out in Western Ma in lakes (Quabbin, Otis) and Swift, Deerfield Rivers etc. There's also a ton of SW fishing in MA if you get into that...

Good luck, you'll have a blast!

mark


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