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Saltwater Fly Fishing Bonefish, Tarpon, Redfish, Permit, False Albacore, Striped Bass, etc...

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Old 12-01-2010, 12:15 AM
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Default Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

I don't travel that much so I do not want that many saltwater rods. But I very occasionally go to places like ontario canada florida keys and various locations in alaska. So I am looking for a rod that can handle large king salmon, pike, musky, tarpon, permit, small dorado/yellowfin. I think a 9 ft 10 wt with a nice saltwater reel and tropical fly line could potentionally handle these but I am not sure. I have only caught these species on conventional tackle, except for the salmon. Right now I have a ton of freshwater rods all the way up to an 8 wt, which has been my only saltwater outfit. I live right next to the coast in southern california with a nice 30 ft boat so I figure I better be more prepared for some saltwater fly opportunities that may arise as well.
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Old 12-01-2010, 12:35 AM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

It could handle all of that, but a 10wt is a big jump from an 8wt, and even a 9 wt. My 9wt feels much more like a heavier 8wt than a lighter 10wt. Plus, on the 10 wt you'll want a good reel, so the weight will increase. Throwing a 10 all day is tiring, no matter how good you haul. Usually 10's require much more line speed to load, so you'll need a good double haul to cast it.

For kings and light big game (dorado, tarpon), the 10 wt will do. All others, including permit, the 9wt. I'd personally go 9 and 10, which I do, but if I could only have 2, I'd go 8 and 10. A 9 is just not big enough for tarpon (babies yes, mommas and daddies, no).
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Old 12-01-2010, 01:56 AM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

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Originally Posted by kfisher99 View Post
I don't travel that much so I do not want that many saltwater rods. But I very occasionally go to places like ontario canada florida keys and various locations in alaska.
You might want to add Loreto, Mexico, to that list. It is a 1.5 hour flight out of LAX. June, July, August are prime time months for Dorado, Roosters, and billfish. Arm yourself with a quiver of 10 and 12 weights (and maybe a 14).

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Originally Posted by kfisher99 View Post
So I am looking for a rod that can handle large king salmon, pike, musky, tarpon, permit, small dorado/yellowfin. I think a 9 ft 10 wt with a nice saltwater reel and tropical fly line could potentionally handle these but I am not sure.
A 10 weight can cover those species, but in some cases a heavier one might be warranted. A Dorado or a Yellowfin that sounds will make you wish that you had a heavier rod. Sometimes a 10 weight rod just doesn't have the lifting power. A larger Tarpon will also make you wish that you had a heavier rod.

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Originally Posted by kfisher99 View Post
I have only caught these species on conventional tackle, except for the salmon. Right now I have a ton of freshwater rods all the way up to an 8 wt, which has been my only saltwater outfit. I live right next to the coast in southern california with a nice 30 ft boat so I figure I better be more prepared for some saltwater fly opportunities that may arise as well.
It is hard to figure out gear unless you know what you are getting into. An 8 and a 10 weight will make a good start. You might want to have multiples of them, too, as back ups. But I have a feeling that you may need something heavier.

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Originally Posted by coconutgroves View Post
It could handle all of that, but a 10wt is a big jump from an 8wt, and even a 9 wt. My 9wt feels much more like a heavier 8wt than a lighter 10wt. Plus, on the 10 wt you'll want a good reel, so the weight will increase. Throwing a 10 all day is tiring, no matter how good you haul. Usually 10's require much more line speed to load, so you'll need a good double haul to cast it.
That is a good point.

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Old 12-01-2010, 01:19 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

I definetly want to fish mexico but havent yet we've been scared to go down there with all the horror stories
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Old 12-01-2010, 06:08 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

A 10 is an excellent choice for the fish you wan to chase--- add striped bass to that list too if you're anywhere near where they swim. And you could also add stuff like cuda, jacks, snook, bull reds as well as sharks to 200lbs or so if you run into them on the flats.

The reels that are paired with 10 weight outfits are also a step up than reels generlaly matched up with 8 and 9 weights, in that they'd typically hold 200 yds plus of 30lb dacron backing as opposed to 200 yds of 20lb for reels matched with 8 and 9 weight reels (by comparison reels matched to 12 weights typically hold 300 yds of 30 lb reels). You can of course increase backing capacity by going with thinner diameter stuff like gel spun.

A 10 will generally be a lot easier to cast than a 12--- and if you're new to chasing tarpon, you might find a 10 is a better choice since the first priority is getting the fly to the fish. You can still put a lot of steam to a fish with a 10 if done properly, especially on flats where you don't have to worry about pumping a fish up from the depths. Where it becomes tougher is chasing small tunoids like yellow tail and any of the bigger ones like 60lb or bigger yellow fin or blue fin tuna that might dive very deep off shore.

If you do decide to chase big tarpon or off shore stuff in "civilized" places like the Keys with a decent tarpon guide, you can also use the guide's heavier 12 weight outfits. (I know the Keys barely qualifies as civilized.... ). The same is true of you're going to chase big game off shore -- again if you're going with a guide that specializes in fly fishing--- this may be more of an issue in remote destinations like baja, belize, panama etc and it's always best to make sure suitable tackle will be available in advance.

I agree with Mosca, an 8 and 10 will cover a lot of situations in SW, so a 10 would be an excellent addition to the 8 you already have. Although you may want a 12 down the road at some point, it's utility is much more limited, and so it would be a much more specialized stick--- and again for most of the stuff you'd chase with it in many destinations you could probably use the guide's gear if you needed it. Good luck!
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Old 12-01-2010, 09:03 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

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Originally Posted by kfisher99 View Post
I definetly want to fish mexico but havent yet we've been scared to go down there with all the horror stories
Loreto, Mexico, is a very safe town. I have skipped the past two years due to tightening my budget. I'm hoping to return in the summer of 2012.

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Old 12-01-2010, 11:22 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kfisher99 View Post
I don't travel that much so I do not want that many saltwater rods. But I very occasionally go to places like ontario canada florida keys and various locations in alaska. So I am looking for a rod that can handle large king salmon, pike, musky, tarpon, permit, small dorado/yellowfin. I think a 9 ft 10 wt with a nice saltwater reel and tropical fly line could potentionally handle these but I am not sure.
A 10 will Handle all of those except for larger tarpon and tuna.

But you'll need a coldwater line, and something for tropical climes.

Something like a "saltwater" line from Rio or SA will handle all fairly well, but its a compromise between 40-60 degree water and 80. You might be better served with a 400 grain teeny type line and a tropical line.

Coco, welcome.
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Old 12-02-2010, 09:42 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

Then there is the issue of wind.

In the Caribbean I've been beaten by the wind using a 9wt. Upping it to a 10 wt this year. I'll take an 8 for th calm day, and whe that wind kicks up, I'll kit it with the 10.

Using an Orvis Hydros. A top of the line light rod helps.
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Old 12-05-2010, 02:40 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

We have some good mako/thresher shark action down here in socal which average around 80-100 lbs sometimes getting up to 200. How would a 10 wt perform on a fish that large? I've fought them on light conventional gear but never seen anyone fly fish them, although I do know some people down south who fly fish them and they have used 10 wts before, my only fear is hooking a 350+ lb blue shark like I have before, which was 400 lbs and we had tuna/billfish conventional gear, and it was still rough. Shark fishing on the fly would be really sweet. And also what line(s) should I definetly have to be versatile in the salt?
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:45 PM
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Default Re: Can a 10 wt rod handle all of this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kfisher99 View Post
We have some good mako/thresher shark action down here in socal which average around 80-100 lbs sometimes getting up to 200. How would a 10 wt perform on a fish that large? I've fought them on light conventional gear but never seen anyone fly fish them, although I do know some people down south who fly fish them and they have used 10 wts before, my only fear is hooking a 350+ lb blue shark like I have before, which was 400 lbs and we had tuna/billfish conventional gear, and it was still rough. Shark fishing on the fly would be really sweet. And also what line(s) should I definetly have to be versatile in the salt?
This 150 pound Great White Shark was caught on a 8'4" 15 weight Scott Bluewater rod with an Abel Super 13. Jeff Patterson was fishing for Makos, but got something else. He was with shark guide, Conway Bowman. Most guys I know are using at least 13 weight rods.


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