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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 03-27-2009, 06:11 AM
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Default Re: Is There a Real Advantage to Longer Rods?

I'm afraid I'm not much of 'gearhead'
I still use some of the same glass rods that I was using in the '70s
In fact, didn't even get myself a trout size graphite until '93-94
So it's way too soon for me to even think about getting one of those new fangled rods
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Old 03-30-2009, 03:37 PM
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Default Re: Is There a Real Advantage to Longer Rods?

Rip Tide, it only seems new because it is recently a trendy issue. Before you bought your first trout sized graphite rods I was using a 16'er in the salt built by Tom Dorsey for overhead casting and softer action spey rods are as old in origin as all other forms of fly fishing with greenheart built 20'ers dating way back in Scottish history.

It has been a long road to bring these rods into the mainstream of the saltwater fly anglers. Even at that, they still haven't embraced the longer two handers where the REAL advantages become obvious. Maybe in another 15-20 years they will! Maybe not?
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Old 03-30-2009, 04:10 PM
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Default Re: Is There a Real Advantage to Longer Rods?

IMHO I think the fly rod sets us apart on the surf. I haven't gotten the Spey bug yet, but I think its because with 2 hands on the rod I may as well be throwing a plug or a bucktail jig with a conventional rod. I guess its just hard to break a habit.
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Old 03-30-2009, 10:35 PM
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Default Re: Is There a Real Advantage to Longer Rods?

Any fly caster in the surf is casting with two hands: one has a hand on the rod and the other hand hauling the line to cast and the other has both hands on the rod with the line trapped in his upper hand to be released on backcast and forward casting strokes to cast. Both are casting the "weight of the line" not the "weight of the projectile" as the conventional and spinning guys do. No similarity at all to each other in mechanics or method but everyone is free to feel as they may about these tools.

Whether one cast's with one hand or two on the rod makes little real difference in whether it's fly fishing or not. It's the hook up and direct contact with the fish to the angler's hand on line connected to the fly in the fishes mouth during the fight that set's us apart from other methods along with the weight of the line vs the weight of the projectile as mentioned above.

"Spey" (which are slow action) rods generally make poor ocean front fly fishing tools .... "two handed" rods designed with a fast action for "overhead casting" rather than "spey casting" are what is desired out front. Some use "spey" rods in tribs and inlets where the current assists them in "spey casting" but they are rare among those who use "two handed" rods in the salt. The "switch" rods are a relative new concept which has some advantages for those with physical conditions that prevent them from fishing single handed rods but (due to their short lengths 10-12.5') have no real line speed advantage (which is the real advantage of longer two handed rods in the salt) over a good single handed caster with a good dbl haul in the salt (but can be fun to cast and fish with none the less).

The terminologies involved with these rods or casting methods can and do cause confusion for fly fishermen, on bulletin boards. and at tackle shops. A "spey rod" is as different from a "two handed rod" as a "single handed rod" is to a "switch rod". Each has it's own specific design intent and excel at some things and are poor at others. The angler ultimately has to weigh out the pro's and con's of each for the anglers needs and decide what works best for them.

Hope this has helped those who might not be aware of these various fly casting tools or are confused to the accepted terminologies involved with them.

There are no right or wrongs just likes and dislikes. I personally use them all at various times and conditions.
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Old 03-31-2009, 08:35 PM
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Default Re: Is There a Real Advantage to Longer Rods?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DEcevR View Post
Any fly caster in the surf is casting with two hands: one has a hand on the rod and the other hand hauling the line to cast and the other has both hands on the rod with the line trapped in his upper hand to be released on backcast and forward casting strokes to cast. Both are casting the "weight of the line" not the "weight of the projectile" as the conventional and spinning guys do. No similarity at all to each other in mechanics or method but everyone is free to feel as they may about these tools.

Whether one cast's with one hand or two on the rod makes little real difference in whether it's fly fishing or not. It's the hook up and direct contact with the fish to the angler's hand on line connected to the fly in the fishes mouth during the fight that set's us apart from other methods along with the weight of the line vs the weight of the projectile as mentioned above.

"Spey" (which are slow action) rods generally make poor ocean front fly fishing tools .... "two handed" rods designed with a fast action for "overhead casting" rather than "spey casting" are what is desired out front. Some use "spey" rods in tribs and inlets where the current assists them in "spey casting" but they are rare among those who use "two handed" rods in the salt. The "switch" rods are a relative new concept which has some advantages for those with physical conditions that prevent them from fishing single handed rods but (due to their short lengths 10-12.5') have no real line speed advantage (which is the real advantage of longer two handed rods in the salt) over a good single handed caster with a good dbl haul in the salt (but can be fun to cast and fish with none the less).

The terminologies involved with these rods or casting methods can and do cause confusion for fly fishermen, on bulletin boards. and at tackle shops. A "spey rod" is as different from a "two handed rod" as a "single handed rod" is to a "switch rod". Each has it's own specific design intent and excel at some things and are poor at others. The angler ultimately has to weigh out the pro's and con's of each for the anglers needs and decide what works best for them.

Hope this has helped those who might not be aware of these various fly casting tools or are confused to the accepted terminologies involved with them.

There are no right or wrongs just likes and dislikes. I personally use them all at various times and conditions.
I understood that "Spey" casting/rod(s)/fishing is just a generic term. It started on the River Spey, with a two handed rod, developed to catch large fish and cast large rods without wearing out your arms. Therefore that style of fishing has been known as "spey" fishing. Different types of casting styles are associated with spey/two handed rods. "Spey" style rods aren't necessarily soft or slow action rods either. That might have been true when they were made of cane or glass. The newer two handed rods are designed for all the "spey" style casting. Roll, snake, snap T, circle, single spey, double spey etc. And you can overhead cast them but not as well as the normal spey/two handed casting methods. All the well known spey/two handed rod experts are trying to get people to call them two handed rods. I know of at least two "pros" that prefer you call them that. Spey is in Scotland and is a river.
I'm building a switch rod for a friend, and with the "spey style" casting, I would think with the correct line, one should be able to cast it farther with less effort too. I don't think switch rods are a fad either. They'll evolve just like other fly fishing rods have. Maybe not so much in salt but definitely in freshwater circumstances. I think like two handed rods they have their place.
Sorry to get off track guys.
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