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Share Patterns List your favorite and selfmade fly patterns. Share with other tyers. Learn how to tie various flies...

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Old 07-11-2010, 02:56 PM
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Default Mini-Swap with ChrisinselwynNZ

Well, I finally got my patterns tied up last weekend and will be sending them off to Chris early next week. The idea behind this mini-swap was to tie up some classic patterns; similar to what Chris has been posting to his classic NZ flies thread for the past couple of months.

His patterns are coming from New Zealand, mine are coming from the UK and the US. We each tied up two of each pattern, provided one to the other and kept one; giving us both 12 new flies to fish when the season starts; which for me, fishing on the Great Lakes tributaries, will be in September.

Here are the patterns, along with the recipes and some history about each:

King's Fisher

Hook: Partridge Bartleet CS10/1, #10
Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0, black
Body: Mohair, green
Rib: Silk, lt. green
Throat: Blue Jay wing hackle fibers
Wing: Peacock body feather eyes, paired

This is one of the earliest patterns; first described in a book by Richard Bowlker in 1774, entitled: The Art of Angling. This fly is a member of what is called the "whole wing" family of salmon flies. Not surprisingly, this pattern is also called the "Peacock Fly". It can also be tied using multiple short strands of peacock herl.

Click the image to open in full size.

Gray Ghost

Hook: #2-10
Thread: Black
Rib: Silver tinsel, oval
Body: Silver tinsel, flat
Wing: Gray hackle
Throat: Gray hackle fibers, tied close to the body
Cheeks: Jungle Cock nails
Head: Black

This is a fly that was developed by the a tackle firm Kilwell and is a very good imitation of the white bait in lighter colors and larger sizes, and the smelt in smaller sizes (#8-10). This fly has survived for many years and still has a following of people who use it today. At one stage, it was a favorite in the Taupo; until the Jack Sprat pattern came along (the Jack Sprat is, essentially, the same fly but with a badger wing). The anglers of the South Island never took to the badger wing and still use the gray one. This fly is very different as it is tied today; the head is gray and the body is any color you like with fluorescent green being the favored color and with a painted eye of white with a black pupil.

Click the image to open in full size.

Black Sky

Hook: Partridge Bartleet CS10/1, #6
Thread: Danville Flymaster, 6/0, black
Tag: Tinsel, oval silver
Tail: Cock hackle fibers, black
Body: Uni yarn, black
Rib: Tinsel, oval silver
Wing: Cock hackle tips, black, paired
Hackle: Hen hackle, black, wrapped full
Head: Black

The Sky series of flies are the creation of Stan Young of Bellvue, Washington. This fly also comes in Blue and Rusty (orange) colors. I chose black because black is the national sporting color of New Zealand. The Black Sky is normally used during the Winter and Spring months on the West Coast in all water conditions, from low and clear to high and discolored.

Click the image to open in full size.

Jack Sprat

Hook: #2-10
Thread: Black
Rib: Silver tinsel, oval
Body: Silver tinsel, flat
Wing: Badger, tied down with the rib
Throat: Badger
Cheeks: Jungle Cock
Head: Black

First tied by Jack England, this fly is the counterpart of the Gray Ghost and would work best after the water has been dirty (thus coloring the naturals the same as a good badger feather).

Click the image to open in full size.

Gold Butcher

Hook: Partridge Bartleet CS10/1, #6
Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0, black
Tag: Tinsel, oval gold
Tail: Goose slips; paired, red
Body: Tinsel, flat, gold
Rib: Tinsel, oval, gold
Wing: Mallard, blue secondaries, paired
Hackle: Cock hackle, claret
Head: Black

This pattern, a variant of the original in that the hackle is claret instead of black, comes from Ireland. Hardy, the UK tackle firm, has a further variant in which the tail, throat and wing are orange in color. This fly can also be tied with Jungle Cock cheeks, but I left them out because I think it makes the fly look smoother.

Click the image to open in full size.

Tongariro Queen

Hook: #2-6
Thread: Black
Tag: Silver tinsel
Tail: Golden Pheasant crest
Body: Yellow and Red wool alternating with ginger hackle tied in between each segment
Wing: Turkey
Collar: Soft ginger cock
Head: Black

Click the image to open in full size.

Caines River Silver Doctor

Hook: Partridge Bartleet CS10/1, #4
Tail: Barred wood duck, paired
Butt: Tinsel, silver, oval
Body: Tinsel, flat, silver
Rib: Tinsel, silver, oval
Wing: 2 grizzly/brown cock hackles, paired and back-to-back, outside these 2 grizzly cock hackles
Cheeks: Jungle Cock
Collar: Cock hackles; silver doctor blue with grizzly over

The Caines River streamers date to the 1920s. The Caines River Silver Doctor is a variant, based on the original Silver Doctor pattern applied to a smelt or bait fish pattern. The wings are "tented" so that the fly swims upright when stripped or drifted.

Click the image to open in full size.

Parsons Glory

Hook: #2-10
Thread: Black
Tag: Gold tinsel, oval
Tail: Golden Pheasant tippets
Rib: Gold tinsel, oval
Body: Yellow floss, black near the head
Wing: Well-marked honey grizzly
Throat: Honey grizzly
Topping: Golden Pheasant crest
Cheeks: Jungle Cock
Head: Black

This pattern is often times referred to as the Golden Fly of New Zealand. When you get this fly wet and then compare it to New Zealand trout fry, it is very similar. This pattern was developed by Phil Parsons and is strongly influenced by the salmon flies, as evidenced by the silver tag, the crown of Golden Pheasant crest and the Jungle Cock cheeks. This was one of the first Matuku (right - the proper spelling is Matuku, not Matuka) flies; at about the same time as the Kiwi and Bittern flies. The fact that it has remained popular for an extended period of time is a testament to its effectiveness. For trout and salmon, most anglers that you come across will try a Parsons Glory as their first fly.

Click the image to open in full size.

Dandy

Hook: Partridge Bartleet CS10/1, #6
Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0, black
Tag: Tinsel, oval, silver / floss, yellow
Tail: Golden Pheasant crest
Butt: Ostrich herl, black
Rear Body: Tinsel, flat, silver
Front Body: Floss, light blue
Throat: Cock hackle, blue, with Guinea Fowl over
Wing: 2 Jungle Cock Nails (paired) / 2 Golden Pheasant tippets (paired)
Cheeks: Cotinga
Head: Black

This pattern is a hybrid of the Black Ranger and has what is commonly referred to as the Irish Wing; paired Golden Pheasant tippets, which is attributed to Pat McKay, who tied these types of patterns from 1810-70. You find this wing either by itself or as an under-wing on many of the later Victorian salmon fly patterns. It is McKay who is credited with first introducing the exotic feathers that came to be used in many of the more complex patterns. The story goes that he visited a milliner shop in Ballyshannon, where he discovered the feathers that were to characterize his work and those of others for the next 100 years. The Dandy was developed by James Wright in the mid-1800s.

Click the image to open in full size.

Ewe Wasp

Hook: #2-8
Thread: Black
Tag: Silver tinsel
Tail: Golden Pheasant crest
Butt: Ostrich herl
Rib: Oval silver tinsel
Body: Yellow floss, black near the head
Throat: black hackle fibers
Under-wing: Turkey
Wing: Mallard flank
Topping: Golden Pheasant crest
Cheeks: Jungle Cock
Head: Black

There are several stories that go with this fly. One of the first is that the British pattern that this is derived from was in turn derived from the Jock Scott and, no doubt, greatly simplified for use in New Zealand (you may notice that all the flies have mallard and/or turkey wings; this is because they were easy to obtain and the preference of color was for red or yellow for the body, there is also green used more recently). The other is that it represents a local wasp, but it was most often used in sizes #1/0-2.

Click the image to open in full size.

Silver Doctor

Hook: Partridge Bartleet CS10/1, #6
Thread: Danville Flymaster 6/0, red
Tag: Tinsel, oval silver / floss, yellow
Tail: Golden Pheasant crest / kingfisher blue hackle tip
Butt: Wool, red, dubbed
Body: Tinsel, flat, silver
Rib: Tinsel, oval, silver
Throat: Cock hackle, silver doctor blue with widgeon over
Wing: Gooses shoulder, red/yellow/blue, married and paired
Head: Wool, red dubbed

The Doctor series of Salomon flies were developed by James Wright around 1830. The first in the series was the Blue Doctor. Others that are well known and fished, include the Black Doctor. Of the variants, the Silver Doctor is the best know and most widely recognized today. It says that this fly, when tied on small hooks, is usually simplified so that the wing is slips of bronze mallard with an underwing of Golden Pheasant tippet fibers. I went the other way and kept the married wing, but eliminated the Golden Pheasant tippet underwing and the bronze mallard.

Click the image to open in full size.

Split Partridge

Hook: #2-8
Thread: Black
Tail: Yellow hackle fibers
Rib: Gold tinsel, oval
Body: Red or yellow wool or mohair
Wing: Split Partridge, paired and tied down with the rib
Throat: Red cock, soft
Cheeks: Jungle Cock
Head: Black

This pattern was developed in the Taupo region. This was one of the flies that people came up with when it was made illegal to fish with Kiwi or Bittern flies (endangered species in New Zealand). You can't even possess these feathers now or import skins (Bittern). The Maori name for Bittern is "Matuku", which is how these flies were tied and the method that is still used today, but with cock feathers binding the feathers to the shaft of the hook. If the feather is no longer that twice the length of the hook, then the feather would very seldomly foul on the hook. The Split Partridge was one of the transition flies that lasted the longest because it is a great fly. It only stopped being used intermittently because 40 years ago the partridge tails were hard to get and those that could be obtained cost a fortune.

Click the image to open in full size.


That's it. We had a good time with this mini-swap; even though I was running like crazy to catch up with Chris, who had all of his patterns tied up and, virtually, in the mail before I had even started.

I'm looking forward to giving these flies a good work-out this Fall on the Salmon River in upstate New York.


Pocono & ChrisinselwynNZ

Last edited by Pocono; 07-12-2010 at 04:31 AM.
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Old 07-11-2010, 03:27 PM
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Default Re: Mini-Swap with ChrisinselwynNZ

You guys tied some great looking stuff there!
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Old 07-11-2010, 06:00 PM
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Default Re: Mini-Swap with ChrisinselwynNZ

Those look to pretty to fish. That is some awsome work guys.
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Old 07-11-2010, 08:56 PM
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Default Re: Mini-Swap with ChrisinselwynNZ

OMG!!!!! we're not worthy!!!!
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Old 07-11-2010, 09:50 PM
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Default Re: Mini-Swap with ChrisinselwynNZ

Amazing flies. Those were fun to see. Thanks.
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Old 08-01-2010, 08:08 AM
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Default Re: Mini-Swap with ChrisinselwynNZ

Poconos flies have turned up, very nicely crafted, beaut job on the silver doctor too.

Ill have too wait till late january before I can try them out, I think the Ashburton river should be best for this type of dressing (its gin clear not too deep not too fast).

Chris
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