The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > Spey Casting, Spey and Switch Fly Rods and Double Handed Fly Fishing > Spey Fly Lines and other Spey Tackle

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-01-2010, 02:22 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 3
milanmax is on a distinguished road
Default recommendations for the spey rod

Hello, my name is Max. I fish on the fly last 25 years, but I never tried spey flyfishing. I intend to fish big salmon like fish on the river Drina in Bosnia and Herzegovina. That fish is the same as the Mongolian Taimen, and weight ranges from 7 to 50 pounds and more, the most common examples are from 20 pounds.
I have a questions. Which class of spey rod I should get, how long should be. Drina river, in average, is 100 meters wide, it is fast, the rapids are 1 to 3 meters depth. Is it 9/10 class rod enough, or 10/11? 14 feet or 15 feet? I wish to put big streamers down to the bottom, what kind of line I should get?
Thanks in advance
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-01-2010, 10:28 PM
MoscaPescador's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 3,727
Blog Entries: 4
MoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

Hi Milanmax,

Welcome to the forum!

Quote:
Originally Posted by milanmax View Post
Hello, my name is Max. I fish on the fly last 25 years, but I never tried spey flyfishing. I intend to fish big salmon like fish on the river Drina in Bosnia and Herzegovina. That fish is the same as the Mongolian Taimen, and weight ranges from 7 to 50 pounds and more, the most common examples are from 20 pounds.
Spey fishing has its many facets to the sport. In some instances there are many methods to fish various kinds of water. I will recommend one method. Another may mention another. I am sure that both tactics will work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by milanmax View Post
I have a questions. Which class of spey rod I should get, how long should be. Drina river, in average, is 100 meters wide, it is fast, the rapids are 1 to 3 meters depth. Is it 9/10 class rod enough, or 10/11? 14 feet or 15 feet? I wish to put big streamers down to the bottom, what kind of line I should get?
For big streamers and fast currents, I am partial to Skagit style fishing. The best way that I can describe that style is taking a short and heavy head to lob a large fly as far as you can. You would connect a 15 feet T-11, T-14, or T-17 tip to the head to help get your fly down fast. I don't think that a 10/11 would be necessary, but any length in between 14 and 15 feet should work fine.

One of my friends fishes Tierra del Fuego in Argentina every year. The conditions that he fishes in seem similar to your description. He has a 15 foot 10 weight and a 14 foot 9 weight. He Skagit style fishes for searun Brown Trout that can get over 20 pounds.

As I mentioned, there are other ways to Spey fish your conditions. Hopefully Diver Dan puts in his opinion. He uses a big stick.

MP
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2010, 02:38 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 3
milanmax is on a distinguished road
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

First, thanks for your welcome and thank you for your recommendations and advice, you have helped me a lot. Fishing season here starts in early June, and then I will try this way of fishing. In the meantime, I will complete my flyfishing accessories and wait for the start of the season. All my further impressions I will post on this forum. In any case, I want to say, this forum is excellent.
Thanks again
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-03-2010, 10:52 AM
Guest1's Avatar
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
Posts: 4,752
Guest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

The river I fish is very large and deep. The current is not real fast most of the time. A real long rod worked out pretty well for me. Mine is a 15 foot 8/9 weight. If you have never spey cast before you may want to start with a floating line because I was told they are easier to learn with than a Skagit line. I started with an Airflo delta spey. I fish water that is at least as deep as yours, and I snag bottom fairly often. I use clousers most of the time, and with a 15 foot leader I get to the bottom with no problem. I have landed pretty big fish with it, so I see you having no problems there. I bought a second rod that is a 15 foot 10/11 weight so I can use a line with a longer belly. Carron Jetstream makes a long belly line with a 75 foot head. If you want to use a longer line in the future, get the heavier rod and go at least 15 foot long. It will be easier to learn with a shorter head line, and then get a long belly line after you learn to cast it. That is how I learned to do it, and it has worked pretty well for me. There is a really good sale on a 15 foot 10/11 weight rod at this web site;
http://www.albrightflyfish.com/fly-r...-fly-rods.html
It's the rod at the bottom of the list.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2010, 02:55 AM
MoscaPescador's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 3,727
Blog Entries: 4
MoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond reputeMoscaPescador has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

Depending on who you ask, you will find people who believe that Skagit style casting is the easiest to learn. That is due to having less of a head to manage. The beauty is that all the mass that is required to cast the line is in a much shorter length.

I learned using a Rio Windcutter Spey line (52 foot head). It took me awhile, but I got the hang of it. Then I went to a Skagit line (28 foot head). It was so much easier to cast.

If you choose to cast Skagit style, practice with a floating tip. After you feel comfortable casting, switch over to sinking tips.

MP
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2010, 09:34 AM
randyflycaster's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 602
randyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to all
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

The kind of line you're going to use has a lot to do with the length of your spey rod.

I'm not sure just how wide a 100 meters is, but if you're going to use a skagit line you'll go with a shorter rod, maybe even an eleven-foot rod. If you want use a line with a longer belly, say a Windcutter or Delta, line you can go with a fifteen-foot rod.

You can use skagit lines on longer rods but you'll have to attach a skagit cheater. (For skagits you'll also have to attach a floating or sinking tip, which will cost you more money.)

To determine the line you're going to use you must ask yourself how much line do you want to retrieve after each cast. On rivers, you probably don't want to do too much retrieving, so I'd think of going with a Windcutter or even a mid-belly line.

(Windcutter is a good, all around spey line.)

If you want to cast sinking tips and/or big flies then I'd certainly consider a skagit line, even though you'll have to do a lot of retrieving.

For someone starting out, I'd stay away from long-belly lines and long rods.

In the end, whatever you do is a compromise.

If you want, call Rio and speak to their tech-department. Those guys are very helpful.

Randy

Last edited by randyflycaster; 03-05-2010 at 09:48 AM. Reason: Correction
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2010, 11:42 PM
Guest1's Avatar
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
Posts: 4,752
Guest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

milanmax, I saw your post on the spey forum, and where they suggested a 15' 10/11 wt. rod. That is the exact rod that is on sale at the site I posted the link to. The rod I learned on is 15'. It was not that hard. I'm giving serious thought to a 17' rod just for casting real long belly lines. I would not start with a long belly line. That might be a rough learning curve. Learning on a 15' rod was OK in my case. For the river as you described it, I'd go with a 15' rod. A 10/11 wt, rod will handle a long belly line if you want to get more distance once you have learned to cast.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-06-2010, 01:58 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 3
milanmax is on a distinguished road
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

Thank you all for your advice. I have been fishing with ordinary rods length up to 10 feet, 8 weight, with a sinking line or with floating line which has a sinking front end and I have some experience in it. When I fish this way I am using a rool cast and generally that work very nice for me, but I have a problem when I want to cast line over 18 meters (approximately 60 feet). Also, when I manage to throw a line (sinking) further , have a problem to control the line (fast current, short rod). That is one of the main reasons why I decided to try spey fly fishing. Other reasons are the beauty of the spey fly fishing, nothing more I need. Due to the size of the river where I fish (100 metars wide is aprox. 330 feet), I decided to get a 15 feet rod, 10/11. I think, I will start with a Skagit line, but I have another question. Looking at the characteristics of the Skagit heads, I found that their marks in the weight, not in class. What weight of the skagit head is suitable for 10/11 rod? If I compare with AFS heads, it appears that 600 to 650 grain weight is suitable for 10/11 rod. Am I right? One more time thank you all, Diver Dan thanks for the link, price of that rod is more than good.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-06-2010, 06:48 PM
randyflycaster's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 602
randyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to allrandyflycaster is a name known to all
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

If you go to the Rio site they have a chart that will tell you what grain line to get.

For a skagit you'll also need a cheater and a sinking or floating tip.

Randy
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-14-2010, 08:24 AM
hookeyeup's Avatar
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1
hookeyeup is on a distinguished road
Default Re: recommendations for the spey rod

Milanmax,

Stop by your local Fly shop and see if they have a "test drive" plan. I am very fortunate where I live, we have a Fly shop that will let you test out rods, lines and reels. This has been very helpful for me. There is some very good advice in the above posts and will definitely point you in the right direction... once you get a direction, see if you can locate a shop that will let you take a package out and try it. I prefer a Delta multi tip setup, it allows me to adjust my swings for all types of runs I encounter. For larger rivers I use a 14' med\fast action Spey, but I am currently testing a 15' with a delta long multi tip setup.

My best advice to you ( you can take it for what it's worth!) would be to pick a length then try different actions in that length. In my limited knowledge I have found that matching a line to a rod is the most important part of the process. But learning what action best fits your style of casting takes some time and testing.
Best of luck in your search
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rod Recommendations fish_gypsy Saltwater Fly Fishing 12 01-15-2010 08:06 AM
Need Western PA recommendations Hockeyref Flies 6 06-28-2009 09:26 PM
looking for line recommendations tca1954 Warmwater Fly Fishing 14 02-28-2008 01:39 PM
Rod Recommendations scottiecoach Fly Rods 3 02-10-2008 03:08 PM
Newbie needs recommendations jayodonn General Discussion 6 01-17-2008 10:11 PM













All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.