The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > General Fly Fishing Discussion > Warmwater Fly Fishing

Warmwater Fly Fishing Bass, Bream, Perch, etc...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2007, 09:43 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 586
Flyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to all
Default Ahhhh, Panfish!

Yesterday evening, on a whim, I hit a local pond for an hour and found the bluegills and an occassional crappie just gung-ho for nymphs. Nothing huge, but fast enough to come close to a fish every cast and end up with enough keepers to fry for a meal this week.

Nobody's ever considered bluegills to be exotic, but there's something just absolutely delightful about a fish that pounds the fly, gives all they've got for fight, and then have another one waiting for the next cast.

Looking forward to the eating....
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2007, 09:58 AM
Piscator's Avatar
Prospecting for Trout
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 390
Piscator will become famous soon enoughPiscator will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

Fr Marion,
Sounds like you had a great time. I had the same situation about a week ago at a small pond. The bluegill are so much more fun to catch compared to the crappie. The sure do fight harder and some times I thought I had a small bass with the way they were fighting. Glad you had a great time. Hope the fish fry goes well.
Later,
Terry
__________________
"Many men go fishing all their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after"
Henry David Thoreau
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2007, 01:22 PM
Reactor's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 63
Reactor has a spectacular aura aboutReactor has a spectacular aura about
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

Well the ice has melted and the torrential rains have subsided long enough to get out and fish for a couple of hours. The water is still cold but I managed to catch on bluegill and one large mouth bass on a streamer. Come on 58 degree water. The crappie will be spawning soon. I like them over the bluegills because I find them easier to filet and they produce larger filets.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2007, 10:34 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1
BassAssassin is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

I went out yesterday as well w/ a buddy. He had a ultra light outfit and I had my 6wt. Caught 18 Blue Gill on a Foam Spider and 12 Crappie on a White Wooly Bugger. My buddy caught nothing. Called me today and wants me to teach him how to fly fish. Another convert
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 05-07-2007, 09:02 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 30
pierce652 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

This may be a very stupid question but how do you fish a nymph in a pond? Short slow strips?
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 05-07-2007, 09:49 PM
zerolimit's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 157
zerolimit is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

I'm right there with you. I did just the same yesterday in a couple of local ponds with bluegill an green sunfish. I hiked in to a new pond and found it to be extremely fishy with excellent structure. Unfortunately, it was nearly unfishable without a float tube. I say nearly because I was able to fool a couple of sunfish and one bluegill on a small damsel fly nymph with a bow and arrow cast through a small opening in the brush with my three weight. There was a big damsel and dragon hatch going on.

Pierce, not a stupid question at all. It depends on what kind of nymph we are talking about. If it's a bug that has the ability to swim a bit, you can animate it to a degree to emulate the natural. With the tiny flies, it can be difficult to detect the strike unless you can see the fly and/or the fish. You could certainly utilize some sort of strike indicator setup.

In the case of the damsel nymph I was fishing, I really didn't think much about it. Hard enough just to get it to the fish. It was a sight fishing situation and I just allowed the nymph to slowly sink on its own watching for the take. They were very spooky but there were fish literally waiting in line for the take. It was interesting to watch the pecking order.

I absolutely love panfish on the fly as you can see from my avatar.
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Mike
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 05-08-2007, 10:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 586
Flyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to all
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

Pierce, I've always brought the nymphs in with short strips, though slowly. There may be more effective methods, though. I'm curious what others do . . .

I do think--and this may cause some debate--that a bluegill's world is divided into edible and non-edible. I've never found any small fly or popper that was much different in productivity over the long term--so long as it was presented as an easy meal.

I've not targeted truly big bluegills, though. Those who do often bring up the old adage "They didn't get that way by being stupid." That's probably true, but some of them swear by flies that look like nothing I've ever seen in the water. I remember discussing this on another board with a very successful big bluegill fisherman-one who had caught several in the 14 inch range. His argument was that you weren't likely to catch a bluegill that size with a dime store fly that looks like a... well, no one knows what it looks like. It had to closely imitate a natural food source, in his view, to work on the big ones with any consistency.

Then, however, he endorsed a chartreuse and black, rubber-legged, beadhead Jitterbee as his best fly. Not to boast, but I think I stumped him when I asked him what that imitated. There's nothing in the water that I'm aware of that is anywhere near its resemblance.

I'd bet my last dollar the reason he does so well with big bluegills is that he gets in the right water, puts the fly in the right depth, etc. In effect, he gets a tasty looking morsel right in front of the bruiser's nose.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 05-08-2007, 10:33 PM
zerolimit's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 157
zerolimit is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

I wonder if that may have something to do with fish being samplers. An oddball looking fly that looks like it could be an easy source of protein never seen by the fish before may just prove irresistable whereas the big fish that's seen it all may be weary of the fly that looks like the one that he's ruled out over time. In that case, the juicy attractor could be more effective than the imitator.
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Mike
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 05-17-2007, 08:11 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 586
Flyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to allFlyfisher for men is a name known to all
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

Interesting theory, zerolimit. I do think curiosity is a reason a fish sometimes hits. Why else would they bounce a bobber or strike indicator when they are not defending a nest?
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 05-17-2007, 08:49 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 88
xjguy07 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Ahhhh, Panfish!

i believe that blue's and other pan fish like to sample what they eat before they eat it. when fishing for panfish useing a wollybugger or nymph i'v found they like to take swypes at it and rub on it before acculy trying to injest it. but i've found the surface flies are usually a one strike deal hit or miss.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On














All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.