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-   -   Warmwater flies. (http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/warmwater-fly-fishing/307462-warmwater-flies.html)

brian miville 01-09-2013 08:53 AM

Warmwater flies.
 
So long story short I have mostly used just spinning and baitcasting gear for bass and panfish. My cheap flyrod combo served as a side attraction for panfish. I am moving into a more flyfishing-centric mode of fishing. My fly collection right now is small, mainly some wooly buggers, muddler minnows and a bunch of small panfish poppers. I am using a 3wt for panfish and 5wt for bass in the sub 5 pound range (would say rough average size would be 3 pound.)

So here I am looking to beef up the collection, and I am seeking advice on what to buy (and if it matters I do plan on picking up tying eventually since I bought myself a fairly decent vise years ago but hardly used it....plus I have all the tools needed, but just a very basic collection of materials.) I already have an idea on some stuff I think I want to add like:

crayfish pattern
clouser minnow pattern
some kind of leech pattern
worm pattern

I have also had some decent luck using a royal coachman wet fly for panfish, so will probably get/make more of those as well as more of the poppers. I would also love a good damselfly pattern since one of my old bass honey holes had tons of them, and the bass would do aerobatics just to get to these things (I swear it was like their crack cocaine!)

So, any other suggestions or ideas? Both in patterns and pre-tied flies?

Thanks!

wabi 01-09-2013 09:32 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
Most of my fishing is for panfish with a 2 or 3wt rod.
My go-to patterns are:
topwater:
foam beetle
elk hair caddis
Griffin's gnat
sub-surface:
green weenie
PT nymph
a bead chain eyed maribou minnow ( http://ultralightflyfishing.com/foru...hp?f=94&t=6643 )

Used the minnow to catch a 'gill yesterday in a very cold pond.
See the thread in this forum -
http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/fo...gill-year.html

dpreller 01-09-2013 10:40 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
one of the beautys of warm water fishing is that you dont need an endless supply of patterns. id say wahat you have and plan on adding should be fine. id probably also throw in a general bead head nymph like a pheasant tail zug bug or hares ear in size 10 or so for panfish and go with that. you cam always pick up some other stuff thats strikes your fancy as you see them but those general patterns will catch plenty of fish.

brian miville 01-09-2013 11:21 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
Thanks fellas, this is just what I was looking for. A bunch of easy patterns to tie that work. I figured I would not have to go overboard pattern-wise like for trout since warmwater beasties tend not to be too picky as long as it is flashy and/or has gaudy bright colors. :D

Rip Tide 01-09-2013 11:26 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
I wouldn't go out without top water flies

The sneaky pete slider is a "big fish" fly for me and as much as I like my own popper patterns, most of the time the Gartside gurglar is a better producer.
Gurglars are too easy not to tie your own, and besides most commerical bass flies don't come with weed guards, and that's a "must" where I fish.


http://www.fieldandstream.com/files/...SneakyPete.jpg

http://www.jackgartside.com/images/f..._feathered.jpg

bigjim5589 01-09-2013 11:38 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
Brian, there are many fly patterns that will work well for warmwater species. The others have given you some great advise.

I use some flies that are generally designed for Steelhead, or Alaska type fishing, such as the MOAL & Intruder style flies. Stream Smallmouths particularly like these.

Here's what I go with for the types you mentioned.
crayfish pattern - Bonefish or flats types of flies: Gotcha's, Crazy Charlies, Squimps - these are simple, imitate shrimp, but work well as crayfish too. I adjust the colors to imitate the local crays, which are mostly rusty brown to olive green shades. Some have blue, red, purple or orange hi-lites too.

In the past, I tried to imitate crayfish with patterns that had double claws & all the details you see on the real thing & on many cray patterns, but found all that was not necessary. Now, I much prefer the simple, impressionistic patterns, and the fish like them too. I also like the fact that the simple patterns take less materials & less time to tie, and since I end up losing quite a few, it's not a big hit on the wallet.

clouser minnow pattern Use a lot of these in all kinds of sizes. If you tie them very small, like size 8 or 10, go with finer textured hair, like Arctic or Red Fox. Bucktail is the standard material, but when you go small, the finer hair works better. Keep them sparse too.

some kind of leech pattern I like anything with rabbit strips, but also like a Clouser style fly tied with black ostrich herl and some flash, like copper or bronze, or both. Ostrich herl in other colors too can be used as I mentioned above for the smaller sizes of Clouser Minnows. I like ostrich better than marabou for some tying as marabou will sometimes mat up, especially if the water has a lot of suspended particulate matter in it. That's not usually a problem during the colder months, but can be when it's warmer.

worm pattern - Again, rabbit strip flies work well. I tie them in many colors, but like to think in terms of what works well with jigs or other bass lures. Black & blue is a great jig color combo & it works well with flies too.
I'll add some weight to these, usually a conehead, bead head or barbell eyes.

Topwater - Can't go wrong with poppers. Deerhair bugs work well too. I also like some of the foam flies that are tied for the big western trout rivers, like BLT's, Triple Deckers, or Chernobyl's. All of these float well and can imitate many things, including hoppers & crickets, big adult Stoneflies or even Damsels & Dragonflies.

I recently posted some spinner flies I had tied up. I also still fish with spinning & baitcasting tackle, and have no qualms about using a little hardware with my fly rod especially for panfish. The flies I posted are very simple, and I've added some clip on, inline spinners to them. They work quite well, and can be easily cast with a 5 wt. In smaller sizes, they could probably be cast with the 3 wt. May not be something all folks would do, but since your in NH, you probably have a good number of White or Yellow Perch up there too, and these spinner flies can be deadly on them. Crappies like them also!

Here's the link to that post: http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/fo...ent-tying.html

Hope this helps! :D

brian miville 01-09-2013 11:50 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
Some more great suggestions!

Rip Tide, that gurgler looks good. I just watched a Youtube video on how to tie the foam beetle wabi mentioned, and it looks like the gurgler is pretty much the same general thing only with a nice long tail. So I can see why you say it is an easy tie!

bigjim5589, I actually remember seeing your post about the inline spinners the other day. It was something I thought I should give a try. And I really like what you have to say about the crayfish. I must admit I have looked at a bunch of patterns online, and the detail they get into can be a bit intimidating. But I guess I forgot the biggest difference between trout and bass/panfish is that trout are much more picky about looks.

Since I have a ways between now and when the water warms up I think I may need to make myself a list of materials and start filling up some fly boxes so I can hit the ground running come spring time. :cool:

bigjim5589 01-09-2013 12:00 PM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
Quote:

But I guess I forgot the biggest difference between trout and bass/panfish is that trout are much more picky about looks.
I've caught trout on such flies as well. Have caught carp on them too, and they can be even more picky than trout.

Any fish species can get picky at times, but IMO that's often in places where they get pounded heavily by anglers. I've seen it happen with LM bass on some of the tidal rivers I fish. Those rivers get a lot of club tournaments on them, and the bass get skittish. They become real picky about what they'll strike & when.

Panfish are not usually picky at all, however, I've even experienced it some with them, particularly the larger fish.

Often means you have to do something completely different than what you might normally, or what everyone else may be doing. IMO, how a fly moves is usually more important than how it looks. ;)

derelict 02-15-2013 09:04 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
I was just going to ask this same question. Looking for suggestions on what to have in my stock for warm water fish. Ive got a lot of really small nymphs and floating flies for trout but nothing big for things like bass.

Any other suggestions?

piscatorial_phd 02-15-2013 11:52 AM

Re: Warmwater flies.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by brian miville (Post 514523)
So long story short I have mostly used just spinning and baitcasting gear for bass and panfish. My cheap flyrod combo served as a side attraction for panfish. I am moving into a more flyfishing-centric mode of fishing. My fly collection right now is small, mainly some wooly buggers, muddler minnows and a bunch of small panfish poppers. I am using a 3wt for panfish and 5wt for bass in the sub 5 pound range (would say rough average size would be 3 pound.)

So here I am looking to beef up the collection, and I am seeking advice on what to buy (and if it matters I do plan on picking up tying eventually since I bought myself a fairly decent vise years ago but hardly used it....plus I have all the tools needed, but just a very basic collection of materials.) I already have an idea on some stuff I think I want to add like:

crayfish pattern
clouser minnow pattern
some kind of leech pattern
worm pattern

I have also had some decent luck using a royal coachman wet fly for panfish, so will probably get/make more of those as well as more of the poppers. I would also love a good damselfly pattern since one of my old bass honey holes had tons of them, and the bass would do aerobatics just to get to these things (I swear it was like their crack cocaine!)

So, any other suggestions or ideas? Both in patterns and pre-tied flies?

Thanks!

I am a popper nut as you will see on my posts and constantly designing, testing and selling them. About damsel flies... You are 100% correct. I sometimes watch bass follow damsel and dragon flies just waiting for them to get close enough to the surface and SPLASH!. I used to use the foam bodied damsels tied for trout, but the bass just shred them with violent hits, so I am working on a thin popper bodied damsel that is more durable and will look like a drowned damsel.

Now, the biggest bass I ever caught was pushing 27" and I caught it on a large dry fly called the Bass Skater that Harry Murray taught me to tie. You can probably figure out how to tie it from the picture. I use kiptail for the tail and wing. I typically tie it on a 1x long hook in size 8 and larger.

It is also easy to fish. Cast it, drag it just enough to form a "V" on the surface, but not to sink it. It can look like a hopper, hex, or stonefly... very versatile.

http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/ph...ss_Skater3.jpg


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