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Warmwater Fly Fishing Bass, Bream, Perch, etc...

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Old 06-27-2014, 08:28 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

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Originally Posted by zeolite View Post
Luke

I am an experienced fly fisher but I am new to Texas and warm water species. I live in Porter and if you want to meet up and show me some spots I can certainly show you a few flyfishing techniques. Having said that, you seem to be doing pretty well by yourself!

Ian
Hey Ian, that sounds great! Porter huh? that's not to far from me... around 30 minutes... When I find a good spot, I will definitely invite you to fish it with me!

I do know of good ponds in the woodlands area, mostly bass/bream. But with a 2-4wt bluegill are pretty fun. Although, I've never trout fished, so I couldn't compare haha! A Houston fly fisher told me, "Down in the south, if it looks 'fishy' there is probably fish in it" And he is one who fishes a bayou downtown in the middle of the city for carp and other species.

My best advice for learning the warmwater species is to find a pond or lake that is closest to you. That way you have more time fishing

You probably around know this, but for anyone else who doesn't:

For general warmwater flyfishing typically a 3,4, or 5 wt is best, but the fish aren't too picky just depends on what you have more fun with.

WF floating line will always be fine, but if you want to get into Bass at all times of the day. Some people will use sinking line, that way the can really fish all of the water column efficiently.

A leader of 6-9ft with tippet from 2-4x is good. Most warm water fish aren't spooky, so the long leaders and thin tippet is not necessary!

For flies: Poppers (various colors and sizes work) 3 main ones, chartreuse, white and black. You can use smaller sizes to catch more fish, but bigger poppers will keep the really small sunfish away.

Prince nymphs, copper johns, and woolly buggers all work great, but a lot of other flies also work. In my experience I haven't been able to find a solid way to "match that hatch" in a small pond. There aren't many stonesyou could find in the water and flip over. Now if dragonflies are present, then it safe to assume so are the dragonfly nymphs, so any of the imitations work great.
I prefer bead head, because in this Texas heat, I find the fish are a little deeper, and the bead head allows me to get down to them faster... but thats just my (noob) opinion.

Lastly like all fishing, dawn and dusk are the more optimal times... and not just because of the fish activity. Because of the sheer heat, it gets very hot and humid, and if you aren't used to it and not properly dressed and hydrated there is the risk of heat stroke. Or just soaking your clothes in sweat So stay hydrated, oh and don't forget the sunscreen everyone!

well I think that is enough rambling for now, thanks for viewing folks!

-Luke
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Old 06-28-2014, 03:05 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

I like this thread man. I would definitely try fishing that creek pool. You can be surprised by what lives in the pools of tiny creeks. Fish it just like you fish the other places.

If the water is pretty shallow in that creek, I think unweighted flies will be better; you have plenty of time to let them sink slowly (and a lot of fish will hit on the fall), and you will get snagged less. An unweighted bugger can be a whole lot of fun in a little creek.
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Old 06-28-2014, 07:45 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

You Texas guys need to check out the Guadalupe river above San Antonio. Fall through spring is the best, no tubers on the river. Even has a trophy section where the trout need to be 18 inches or better.... not to mention the monster stripers that are there as well. My buddies and I used to make the drive at least twice a month from Fort Hood and always caught some trout. Here's a link to more info. Good luck!!

Guadalupe River Fly Fishing | The Guadalupe Fly
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Old 06-30-2014, 12:48 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

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Originally Posted by kingofamberley View Post
I like this thread man. I would definitely try fishing that creek pool. You can be surprised by what lives in the pools of tiny creeks. Fish it just like you fish the other places.

If the water is pretty shallow in that creek, I think unweighted flies will be better; you have plenty of time to let them sink slowly (and a lot of fish will hit on the fall), and you will get snagged less. An unweighted bugger can be a whole lot of fun in a little creek.

Thanks, I still haven't found time to go out but when I do I will definitely try out the weighted fly!

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfisher76544 View Post
You Texas guys need to check out the Guadalupe river above San Antonio. Fall through spring is the best, no tubers on the river. Even has a trophy section where the trout need to be 18 inches or better.... not to mention the monster stripers that are there as well. My buddies and I used to make the drive at least twice a month from Fort Hood and always caught some trout. Here's a link to more info. Good luck!!

Guadalupe River Fly Fishing | The Guadalupe Fly
Hey thanks for that! Earlier when I first started researching fly fishing I ran into the Guadalupe, while that is my closest place to catch trout, its still over a 3 hour drive, and I wouldn't go without another experienced angler to help me. And since its 3 hours away, that's 3 (or 6 if you compare the total trip there and back) extra hours I could be fishing in a warm-water bayou or farm pond One day though, I would love to fish for some trout, and I honestly cannot wait for that day. But for now I'll stick with the local native species until I get more experience under my belt.



On another note, for awhile I've been really interested in tying my own flies. I originally planned on buying a simple vise with strong jaws, just to get a cheap vise and get started (Griffin Superior 1A). But after more thought I've starting looking more at the Renzetti traveler, or the peak rotary vise. I realized if I plan on upgrading in the future, why not skip and first vise and save some money? Although being a mainly warm water angler compared to cold water, I am not sure I will need to tie the same flies that the rotary function really shines. My thinking is that I wouldn't want to spend money on something only to barely appreciate the bells and whistles. Does that make sense?

Also, I am unsure where the best place to buy all of my materials, I don't have any fly shops close to me. So I think I will have to buy my materials online. Does anyone know of good sites where I could buy from?

Thanks for reading folks!

Luke
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Old 06-30-2014, 02:55 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

There is a Bass Pro in Pearland Texas(south of Houston). Give them a call and see if they do any fly tying demos. Plus being able to physically look at some things helps. They should have a shop called White River which is their fly shop. As for buying supplies, you have to shop around. One store might be great for hackle but another might be better for hooks and beads.
The Guadalupe is a great river, you can park right at the dam and wade downstream a bit. Best time is in the winter so you won't have to miss much on the ponds and lakes. Neoprene waders is what I used and they kept me plenty warm.
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Old 07-04-2014, 07:55 AM
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Luke,

I have enjoyed reading your posts in your journal, your enthusiasm for the sport comes out real clear in your writing. You have learned a lot and done very well. Some of the sunfish you have caught are beautiful. You may want to do some research on different species of sunfish. It can be a bit challenging to ID them all because they do hybridize, but I'm pretty sure you had some bluegills, green sunfish and pumpkinseeds in your photos. Might be a way to add a few additional species to "fish caught on a fly rod" list. By the way, the Davy knot is a great simple knot and I believe every bit as strong as a clinch knot. Your 4 wt outfit seems like a great outfit for the kind of fishing you have been doing. If you do decide to go after carp you will probably be severely undergunned with the 4wt. Not to say it can't be done but it may be very tough to bring a carp to hand on that outfit. However, carp are absolute blast on a fly rod with the right equipment. Keep up the good work and good luck!

John
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:51 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

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Originally Posted by dc410 View Post
Luke,

I have enjoyed reading your posts in your journal, your enthusiasm for the sport comes out real clear in your writing. You have learned a lot and done very well. Some of the sunfish you have caught are beautiful. You may want to do some research on different species of sunfish. It can be a bit challenging to ID them all because they do hybridize, but I'm pretty sure you had some bluegills, green sunfish and pumpkinseeds in your photos. Might be a way to add a few additional species to "fish caught on a fly rod" list. By the way, the Davy knot is a great simple knot and I believe every bit as strong as a clinch knot. Your 4 wt outfit seems like a great outfit for the kind of fishing you have been doing. If you do decide to go after carp you will probably be severely undergunned with the 4wt. Not to say it can't be done but it may be very tough to bring a carp to hand on that outfit. However, carp are absolute blast on a fly rod with the right equipment. Keep up the good work and good luck!

John
Thank you John for your kind words. Kinda funny I recently caught a sunfish I hadn't seen in person before. And well, from there on starting ID'ing all of the types of sunfish I have caught. You were right, I have caught those fish, and soon you can read about me catching some longear

Yea, I have realized that issue... Right now while yes I'd love to catch a carp, I have been afraid of them talking me for a long and wild ride that may be too long that it could potentially harm the fish. So really, I am more of trying to find the carp, then catching them. But if I do find them, I can always take out the 20$ 6wt rod I started with... I have talked with a few locals, and the carp they have caught in a 20-30min radius of where I live are always less than 10 lbs. Now a member here (Pete a), he has caught some big carp down in the bayous close to downtown Houston about 45min to an hour south of mein that case I would definitely need a heavier weight rod for those fatties, haha
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Old 07-15-2014, 12:29 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

Very refreshing thread. Im pretty new as well. Keep posting, you got a good thing going on.
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Old 07-22-2014, 01:45 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

Great thread you've got here. Like you, I started on my own and nobody in my family fished. That was the '80s, before the internet, and all I had was books and magazines to guide me. I lived near some trout water and hit it as often as I could, learning a little every trip. You're on a lifelong path of fun, discovery, learning, and relaxation. Texas isn't exactly fly fishing capital of the world, but there's plenty of fish to be had for those of us who fling flies. Just wait'll you hook your first redfish on fly!
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:57 PM
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Default Re: A Beginners Journal

That my friend is the exact first fly rod I ever had!

Sent from the Gobblers Roost using Tapatalk
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