Home | Fly Fishing Features | News | Hardy & Greys announce major breakthrough in rod design

Hardy & Greys announce major breakthrough in rod design

By
Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font
One of the new rods being put through its paces. One of the new rods being put through its paces.

Hardy & Greys Ltd today announced to the press the most significant development in fishing rod design for twenty five years. Fish&Fly Technical Director Colin Bradshaw was there.

Today I may have witnessed a bit of history, “Where were you on the 27th of May 2010”, people may ask?

Decades after changing the fishing rod world with the introduction of carbon fibre, Hardy, the well known British brand, has done it again. A 12-man media-jury gathered in Alnwick today to hear of Hardy’s new breakthrough technology called SINTRIX™. The fishing rod world will really never be the same again.

SINTRIX™ short for Silica Nano Matrix is a new formulation of resin that binds the carbon fibre and re-enforces the blank to such an extent that broken rods may be a thing of the past. On the Hardy rod test machine today we witnessed a SINTRIX™ fly rod basically being bent double without breaking. It was a staggering demonstration. Rods made with SINTRIX™ are effectively 60% stronger, up to 30% lighter and have hugely improved impact resistance over conventional carbon fibre.

Initially the new technology will be used in Hardy fly rods but eventually SINTRIX™ will also be used in Carp, Coarse and Sea ranges within the Greys and Chub brands.

Rods made with this technology (SINTRIX™ inside!) will take the market by storm when they launch in January 2011. The rest of the world's rod makers are, from today, playing catch up.

From Hardy & Greys

Hardy & Greys Ltd are proud to announce the most significant development in fishing rod design for twenty five years.

SINTRIX ™material provides rods which are 60% stronger, up to 30% lighter and with hugely improved impact resistance over conventional carbon fibre.

Initially the new technology will be used in Hardy fly rods but eventually SINTRIX™ will also be used in Carp, Coarse and Sea ranges within the Greys and Chub brands.

Decades ago when we moved away from cane and fiberglass, carbon fibre changed the way fishing rods were made. Carbon being remarkably strong for its weight gives us many advantages for modern rod design.

The carbon rods we use today have of course advanced over the years but the trends for lighter and faster blanks lead to rods which can be brittle, unforgiving and prone to breakage during use.

The carbon fibre in any fly rod blank is supported by a bed of resin, typically this resin or matrix simply holds the fibres in parallel alignment so that as the rod bends, the fibres can flex and return into position. However if a carbon rod is suddenly bent beyond its limits, the normal resins used in manufacture are unable to support the fibres adequately because the carbon fibres are stronger than the resin. The result is catastrophic failure due to the fibres buckling or, put simply, the rod breaks. These failures occur because typical modern fishing rod resins simply do not contain enough toughening mechanisms to give the fibres enough protection.

SINTRIX™ is an enhanced fortified matrix resin which supports and bolsters the carbon fibres to withstand a far higher degree of bending and loading than ever before. Through technology, exclusive to Hardy & Greys Ltd, specially treated silica nano spheres are blended into a SINTRIX™ resin. Thousands of the nano spheres surround every individual carbon fibre giving a very even distribution of the particles throughout the resin which results in rods with unparalleled smooth casting actions. This technology is radically different to any previous nano rods using titanium nano or carbon nano tubes. These previous carbon nano technologies simply attempted to reinforce the carbon and not the all important resin. The bending strength of a SINTRIX™ fly rod is vastly improved over outdated common designs. Controlled testing has proven that SINTRIX ™fly rods are over 60% stronger and up to 30% lighter than previous carbon rods. A SINTRIX ™fly rod will bend further without damage and will also take incidental impacts far better than any conventional fly rod design.

On a recent test trip to Florida five Hardy & Greys product developers caught around 1,000 fish on SINTRIX ™rods .The fish ranged from 5lbs to 350lbs and the idea was to put the SINTRIX blanks in situations above and beyond normal use.  Despite their best efforts to test the rods to destruction our testers did not break a single SINTRIX ™rod! Some of this action is available to view on YouTube.

Andy Mill, Hardy & Greys US based consultant and five time gold cup Tarpon tournament winner said about SINTRIX™ rods.

“These new SINTRIX™ rods are the most powerful, lightest, smoothest casting rods ever designed EVER!”

Andy recently landed an 80lb Tarpon in Just four minutes using a SINTRIX™ rod.

Peter McLeod from Aardvark McLeod, International fly fishing specialists on the Hardy SINTRIX™ rods.

“The perfect rods for the flats, I adored using them. They are light, responsive, have quick recovery, fantastic presentation and huge reserves of power. The blanks were so thin they just cut through the wind. Bottom line is these are without doubt the best rods I have ever used and when they go into production I will use nothing else”.

Initial SINTRIX™ developments involve three Hardy fly rod ranges, one saltwater range and two freshwater ranges which will include double handed models. The new Hardy SINTRIX™ rods are set to be available in January 2011.

In addition to these increases in performance and durability the company retains its commitment to using the highest quality fittings. This combination has not, however, resulted in a price increase which puts this material and its advantages out of reach to most consumers and prices should be comparable with other premium fly rod ranges.

At Hardy & Greys Ltd. We believe that SINTRIX™ is THE new generation of carbon fibre technology and is the most significant breakthrough in rod development since the move from glass to carbon fibre twenty five years ago.



Image gallery





Articles by the same author






Comments (21 posted):

Editor on 27/05/2010 16:10:58
avatar
Probably the biggest news in fly fishing this year or even the decade breaking right now. What do you think of this announcement - will it have the impact they say it will?
BigCliff on 27/05/2010 17:11:35
avatar
Probably the biggest news in fly fishing this year or even the decade breaking right now. What do you think of this announcement - will it have the impact they say it will? No. I'd rather be wrong, but I can't help but think its just the latest gimmick to sell $700 rods. Its timing shortly before a impending debut from Loomis, billed with similar hyperbole, also seems telling.
mcnerney on 27/05/2010 17:22:42
avatar
It will certainly be interesting come January when the public can get their hands on the new rods for casting. Larry
Pocono on 27/05/2010 23:55:06
avatar
Well, you can't test cast hyperbole, that's for sure. We'll all have to wait until they go into production to see if they're worth the premium that they will undoubtedly seek to command. Within reasonable bounds, the more I fish the more I become convinced that its the skill of the fisherman and not the quality of the fishing gear that really counts. Will I try out the new Hardy rods.........ummmmmmm.....................sure! Pocono
Fly2Fish on 28/05/2010 00:32:03
avatar
. . . the more I fish the more I become convinced that its the skill of the fisherman and not the quality of the fishing gear that really counts. Truer words were never spoken!
michaeln on 28/05/2010 03:43:16
avatar
Betcha if you slam a car door on the tip it'll be toast like any other rod. ;-)
Hardyreels on 28/05/2010 05:24:28
avatar
Within reasonable bounds, the more I fish the more I become convinced that its the skill of the fisherman and not the quality of the fishing gear that really counts. I heard that........................... Remembering that I have caught more AK. Salmon with my Quarrow Bighorn Drake than any other rod is always my starting point when I look at a $700 fly rod. Not that I don't like 700 dollar rods; it's just that, well, I have enough of that line up. I do own a Grey's Platinum X 7wt and I like it just fine. They make a good rod. Ard
Brewmaster on 28/05/2010 09:03:48
avatar
Within reasonable bounds, the more I fish the more I become convinced that its the skill of the fisherman and not the quality of the fishing gear that really counts. Only $700? Anybody want to take a bet it will be more like $800 ?? I am sure the new rods will result in a lot of analysis & testing articles in fly fishing magazines, and will also generate a ton of postings in various blogs & forums. I hope the companies are successful in selling lots of the new high-tech rods to folks that have plenty of extra $$. After all, a strong fly fishing manufacturing environment also drives technology down into lower-cost rods. Will I buy one? Absolutely not! I think Pocono's comment is right on the mark, and I find that I enjoy fly-fishing just fine with the rods I currently own.
troutchops on 30/05/2010 17:58:45
avatar
Wasn't the Orvis Zero Gravity rod the most advanced fly rod in 25 years, then a year later it was obsolete. It was replaced by the next most advanced rod in 25 years.....Sorry, I just don't buy into it.
cb on 01/06/2010 14:38:00
avatar
Wasn't the Orvis Zero Gravity rod the most advanced fly rod in 25 years, then a year later it was obsolete. It was replaced by the next most advanced rod in 25 years.....Sorry, I just don't buy into it. I do ! - I was there at the launch and handled these rods. These rods are fast actioned and very light yet strong - and they will not be super expensive either. Twice I have had Spey rods snap on me while casting (famous makes) once in Norway and once in Iceland. I had a long walk back to camp on both occassions and no fishing that day of course. With this new material - this will be a thing of the past. We can at last have performance and lightness - but not at the cost of durability. The very light-fast rods being sold today are very thin walled and very vulnerable! Colin.
Frank Whiton on 03/06/2010 00:38:43
avatar
Hi Everyone, Obviously there is some promotion going on but that doesn't mean this isn't really something new and a step forward. The Orvis Helios is the one to beat for light weight construction but it does have thin wall construction. If Hardy can build a rod that is just as light but tougher than the Helios, I think it is a step in the right direction. I am working with a Hardy Marksman Rod and it is a lot of rod but not overly expensive. Hardy/Grey's is working hard to produce good casting, reliable rods and this new technology may really prove to be everything they claim. Now if it is priced a couple of hundred below a Helios I would buy one. The people who will really benefit from a lighter, tougher rod is the Inshore, Steelhead/Salmon, and Spey fishers. With long rods light weight and toughness is highly desirable as noted by cb. Frank
sixweight on 19/06/2010 13:43:38
avatar
As someone who brings multiple rods and reels to the water with me, I would be more interested in how this rod fits into my arsenal. I don't believe in an all purpose rod and try to match tackle to the conditions. Having said that, I can always use another high quality rod.
imxer on 15/07/2010 15:10:00
avatar
Editor: While rod technology is a subject I find fascinating and will be following this latest example closely, I have to believe that the tackle distribution system being employed by Manufacturers such as Allen Or Colton etc will have more influence upon fly fishing than the latest "got'a have" wonder stick of this or any year. Imxer
mojo on 15/07/2010 23:55:30
avatar
Editor: While rod technology is a subject I find fascinating and will be following this latest example closely, I have to believe that the tackle distribution system being employed by Manufacturers such as Allen Or Colton etc will have more influence upon fly fishing than the latest "got'a have" wonder stick of this or any year. Imxer I'm going to disagree. You guys (With Frank being the exception) aren't looking at the BIG picture. Not necessarily in any real time frame, I'll try to explain what I mean. In a galaxy far, far away- or, back in the olden days we all fished with fiberglass (or bamboo). Then some yahoo comes along and uses space aged material called graphite to build some fishing rods. 10 years later, you can't hardly find fiberglass rods for sale (new). So the graphite is a hit, and it gets lighter (and more brittle) Boron, titanium and all sort's of cr@p go into rod building. Winston and their boron laced rods came and are still here. A few years ago Orvis gets some graphite and thermally (or something cool like that) infuses new "epoxy resins" in the graphite to make it lighter and stronger which they did, you can't deny that. Again it's another start. Not from the beginning, but ..... The graphite and boron are still here, but the new resins will make lighter and stronger rods. Hardy's/Greys new rod line is coming out and in a month Rejeff/ Loomis have a new rod line out too. Anybody want to place a wager on it and it'll have something to do with the new thermoplastic supercalifragilistic resins impregnated in the good old school graphite? Just like computers, one breakthrough leads to another and I think this is the next big thing. Unlike computers, it's more than 18 months between breakthroughs. p.s. as for Allen Fly Fishing (Justin- don't get me wrong, I love your reels) all the stuff that is being built in China, is getting better and better. But it's still a copy of the original I still think Chinese build rods leave a lot to be desired compared to American built rods. Most Chinese rods are copy's of American premium rod tapers anyway.
allenflyfishing on 16/07/2010 14:57:54
avatar
mojo.. no problem. I'm also developing a rod aswell that is not made in China. I have prolly 12 samples made so far with changing things as I go. As for it being brittle. I'm adding another component into the blank that prevents that. We'll see, I'm hoping I get to the 2.3oz and the added materail holds true. Project in the works. Working with some great people from my past work that are having fun with it. I have no desire to have a new rod every year to spike sales. I just want to have a good rod that will be around for a long time. Kind of a simple way of looking at it I think.
mojo on 16/07/2010 23:11:32
avatar
mojo.. no problem. I'm also developing a rod aswell that is not made in China. I have prolly 12 samples made so far with changing things as I go. As for it being brittle. I'm adding another component into the blank that prevents that. We'll see, I'm hoping I get to the 2.3oz and the added materail holds true. Project in the works. Working with some great people from my past work that are having fun with it. I have no desire to have a new rod every year to spike sales. I just want to have a good rod that will be around for a long time. Kind of a simple way of looking at it I think. I think that's why I like Winston rods so much. Not a lot of models over the years. I get dizzy thinking of Sage's models. But I do think the new resin impregnated stuff will take off. Edit- check it out. Nano supercalifraglilistic resins again. [url=http://saltyshores.com/wordpress/2010/07/15/photography/g-loomis-nrx-fly-rods-icast-2010-las-vegas/]http://saltyshores.com/wordpress/2010/07/15/photography/g-loomis-nrx-fly-rods-icast-2010-las-vegas/ The price is $OUCH.00
imxer on 17/07/2010 23:41:09
avatar
As long as they continue building aircraft of carbon based material, there should be a new and improved "MATRIX" come along every few years. No questioning the fact that it is all very interesting. Looking forward to more.
oregonsteel on 18/07/2010 20:46:58
avatar
I do ! - I was there at the launch and handled these rods. These rods are fast actioned and very light yet strong - and they will not be super expensive either. They wont be super expensive? Will the be made in England or "imported" (china or korea)? If they are "imported" will a spey rod be under $400? A Meiser designed rod by TFO costs just over $300. I think you Hardy fanboys get a bit confused when the term Expensive and Hary are used in the same sentence. Hardy puts out a $80 import reel and charges $250 and only gives it a 1 year warranty and Hardy fanboys gush how inexpensive it is.
mojo on 18/07/2010 20:58:01
avatar
They wont be super expensive? Will the be made in England or "imported" (china or korea)? If they are "imported" will a spey rod be under $400? A Meiser designed rod by TFO costs just over $300. I think you Hardy fanboys get a bit confused when the term Expensive and Hary are used in the same sentence. Hardy puts out a $80 import reel and charges $250 and only gives it a 1 year warranty and Hardy fanboys gush how inexpensive it is. I agree with you again, but it's not just Hardy. Asian built reels can be had for $15 when ordered in bulk quantities and Cabelas, BPS, etc. will sell them for well over $100. TFO, Echo, Ross WW, Cabelas and the others selling rods for a couple hundred dollars with less than $20 invested in one. But that's the global economy and it's here to stay.
troutbum251 on 03/09/2010 15:14:45
avatar
I got to cast two of these rods while they were still in their unfinished prototype stage and they are very light and cast very well. I most likely wont buy one because of the high price tag they will most likely carry, plus I'm a Sage fan so if Im spending that kind of money it would be on a TCX or another Z-Axis.
MoscaPescador on 03/09/2010 16:38:32
avatar
I casted a prototype SINTRIX 10 weight a few weeks back. It casts just as well as any premium rod. It really did not separate itself from the pack. Actually I prefer the casting ability of the current Zane model more than the new SINTRIX. My boss took the 10 weight to Christmas Island to test on Trevally or whatever large fish could be hooked. The rod was able to subdue a 35 pound Yellowfin Tuna in less than 10 minutes. Usually 14 weights are used on Yellowfins because they have to pulled back up to the boat. The Hardy had the backbone to pull this fish up quickly. Within 35 minutes, three Yellowfin ranging between 30 and 35 pounds (measured on a Bogagrip) were landed. The verdict is that the SINTRIX rod is a fighting stick. It is meant to subdue fish fast. The 10 weight was putting the hurt on a 14 weight fish. My guess is that the 12 weight would had brought up the fish faster. The reel matched up with the SINTRIX rod for testing was the Hardy Zane #2 with a WF10F Hardy Mach Saltwater line. MP
Add/View Comments
  • Email to a friend Email to a friend
  • Print version Print version
  • Plain text Plain text

Tagged as:

sintrix, hardys

Image gallery

Rate this article

5.00

Follow NA Fly Fishing Forums!