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  1. Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    I am curious to ask about things I have been hearing about over the years in regards to the Alaska Salmon fishery.

    Are the pike showing up in any decent numbers, I have heard their introduction by whatever means has been another nail in the coffin for the salmon. Sounds like they live high up in the areas the salmon spawn and the pike tend to eat quite a bit of the juveniles prior to their move back to the ocean. Any thoughts on that?

  2. #32
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    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ard View Post
    Hey Dewayne,

    Get this! I was up there like I told you on Friday morning the 22nd for almost 5 hours and saw virtually no sign of fish life. One fish showed in a run I sat on but it was a small one. So that's Friday morning until about 1 PM. I just looked at count date from last week and they passed 618 fish just 3 miles above where I was that day

    You would think that at least a few of that batch might have been spotted as they were in the same river that I was...… Looks like another 300 and change on Saturday too, still the numbers are terrible low but Geeze, that many and I was maybe half a mile low of them. I was up with the casting guys today for 13 1/2 hours and we saw three but hooked none, I was 2 miles higher today than Friday and still no joy. The new caster caught on and is hooked. They had a ball even though we went fishless, shot the breeze, cast, shot more bull, cast, by days end the new guy was lining things pretty good we were just short the fish. They knew going in things might be dry but were dying to get out. Good guys, I had fun but an beat. Left at 5:50 AM and got home 9:30 PM...…… Maybe tomorrow huh?
    There had to be a pile of them just above you camped out below the weir. Probably missed them by just a few hours. Nice to see some decent groups are showing up late. Sure better than what you had 10 days ago.

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  4. #33

    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/publicati...tions-2017.pdf

    I found this interesting and thought perhaps this was a good thread to post in.

    Dave
    I was going fly fishing until my wife suggested it, now I can't tell who is outsmarting who!

    Being "one with nature" requires a knowledge of what animals are living nearby and a weapon of sufficient magnitude to give you at minimum an equal chance of survival. No one has an invisible aura that animals can detect and sense your good intentions.

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  6. #34
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    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    First: thanks for that Dave, the unfortunate thing is that we don't have any major studies ongoing in Cook Inlet even though the industry has taken many millions of dollars in salmon from these waters.

    Quote Originally Posted by olsaltydog View Post
    I am curious to ask about things I have been hearing about over the years in regards to the Alaska Salmon fishery.

    Are the pike showing up in any decent numbers, I have heard their introduction by whatever means has been another nail in the coffin for the salmon. Sounds like they live high up in the areas the salmon spawn and the pike tend to eat quite a bit of the juveniles prior to their move back to the ocean. Any thoughts on that?
    Sorry OSD, I didn't see this until this evening. Yes pike are playing a role in this requiem, they are migrating throughout my part of South Central AK. at this time. This past year there are more special regulation pike waters added to our growing list. The special regs specify that you kill every pike you catch. Unlike game laws requiring you to process and use the fish anglers may discard unwanted pike. My most recent interactions with pike in waters previously void of them were at 8 Mile Creek. I've heard rumors of them showing up further up the Yentna drainage as far as the mouth of Johnson Creek. They have become a major threat in Shell Lake as they are in the Hewitt / Whiskey Lake system also.

    While we will never know exactly how these fish arrived at these remote lakes if you were here, if you traveled the many river miles...…….. It is hard to believe that pike, a fish who does not posses the body of an anadromous fish like salmon would undertake such traveling. These rivers are swift, they are glaciated and so are clouded with suspended silt. They are cold and the distances we are talking for a pike to get from Hewitt Lake to Shell Lake would involve the following:
    1. Leave Hewitt, swim downstream 4 1/2 miles to Yentna River.
    2. Turn right and swim downstream in the glaciated Yentna for 7 3/4 miles.
    3. Turn right at the confluence with Skwentna River also glaciated and swifter.
    4. Proceed upstream in Skwentna battling current speeds up to 14 MPH as you go.
    5. After a brisk 22 mile swim in a river fed by Hays and Skwentna glaciers turn right into Shell Creek.
    6. Now swim an undetermined distance up Shell Creek jumping obstructions as you go.
    7. You are now a pike in Shell Lake where the sockeye population has thrived without pike since way before the white man came here.

    So go figure? To get to Hewitt they would have had to find a way out of landlocked lakes (possibly during flooding) and then made an even longer trip. Many of us have suspicions about how they got where they are but since my own are not based on solid evidence I keep them to myself.

    So yeah, there's pike involved too. All the more reason for us to limit our kill not to kill our limit. That is unless pike fishing then there is no limit.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  7. #35
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    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    As of Friday August 3rd, all sockeye salmon fishing on the World Famous Kenai River has been closed due to low abundance of fish. Hum...……...

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  8. #36
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    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    That's disappointing. Can't bring myself to like this post. How are the run numbers? Not against ancient history, just the past few life cycles if you know.

  9. #37

    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    What can those of us living outside of Alaska do to help? I try to refrain from eating commercially-caught fish when possible, usually eat one meal per week or so of fish, but as pescatarians we don't eat pork, beef, or chicken due to the poor living conditions of those animals and the environmental impacts of producing them. When I lived on the coast I would usually keep a few slot trout and a redfish for the dinner table, but now I live in upstate SC and can't bring myself to kill a trout, even though most are stocked. I view them as a finite resource, and I enjoy fishing for the sport so every fish I catch and release means another fish I can catch a few months later. On a sidenote, I've been tossing around the idea of a float trip with my father in Alaska. The prices seem very reasonable for a self-guided trip so I would like to see Alaska and fish it before the fisheries decline further. I've never caught char, grayling, or salmon, so of course those are bucket list fish for me. I would primarily catch and release, maybe keeping a fish or two for dinner while on the river, but this post has me rethinking my plans (unless I catch a few pike, right?).

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  11. #38
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    Default Re: It's About Time I Said Something About this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flyfishinjax View Post
    What can those of us living outside of Alaska do to help? I try to refrain from eating commercially-caught fish when possible, usually eat one meal per week or so of fish, but as pescatarians we don't eat pork, beef, or chicken due to the poor living conditions of those animals and the environmental impacts of producing them. When I lived on the coast I would usually keep a few slot trout and a redfish for the dinner table, but now I live in upstate SC and can't bring myself to kill a trout, even though most are stocked. I view them as a finite resource, and I enjoy fishing for the sport so every fish I catch and release means another fish I can catch a few months later. On a sidenote, I've been tossing around the idea of a float trip with my father in Alaska. The prices seem very reasonable for a self-guided trip so I would like to see Alaska and fish it before the fisheries decline further. I've never caught char, grayling, or salmon, so of course those are bucket list fish for me. I would primarily catch and release, maybe keeping a fish or two for dinner while on the river, but this post has me rethinking my plans (unless I catch a few pike, right?).
    That seems like a noble gesture but I am not giving up eating fish and I don't think you should either. I don't intentionally eat any species that are in peril. I won't buy or consume AK King (Chinook) Salmon at this time. That hardly limits my fish consumption options. I hope you get a chance to fish AK during a decent year.

    And regarding stocker trout, I don't eat them either, but it's just because I don't prefer them. If you enjoy them it's senseless (IMO), to never eat a stocker bow in the name of conservation. The places east of the Rockies where they can naturally reproduce is just about zero. In many places they can't even survive year around. the hatcheries will make more.

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