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ksigtuck
10-07-2009, 05:13 PM
I am looking to pick up a pair of gloves for fishing in the upcoming colder weather. As this will be the first time that I have fished in anything other than warm weather I am lost as to what I need...what works...what doesn't? Please send along all recommendations and tips.
Thanks,
Tuck

Ard
10-07-2009, 06:03 PM
I use the wool gloves with no finger tips. Been using them for 25 years, I can't seem to handle line with neoprene gloves on. There may be some gloves that are warmer but once the wool quits keeping you warm there are other problems to deal with.............. like the big gobs of ice in all your line guides. I've always thought myself hardcore but once I'm looking at temps under 30* it's time to tie flies.

mojo
10-07-2009, 09:05 PM
Expensive for gloves but I use Simms fingerless. http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/windstopper_half_finger_glove.html?id=atcvVDfm:67. 164.197.182
I had Orvis fingerless fleece and wore them out. Bought the Simms ($34) a couple years ago. I like their length and the windstopper membrane. Fleece dries quick too. Nothing to keep my finger tips warm except a pocket. I guess growing up fishing in cold weather, I figure cold fingers comes with the territory.
I also use a hand warmer. You light a stick and place it in the handwarmer in your pocket. Works ok for me.
For the head, Simms again. Last year at Henry's was bitter cold especially with the wind. Went into W Y and bought this at Blue Ribbon Flies.
http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/gore_tex_exstream_hat.html
One of the best damn cold weather investment I made. Goretex +fleece = damn warm.
$50 seems like a lot for a hat, but I'd rather spend the money and be warm, than a tight wad freezing my tush off. Same with spending $34 for fingerless gloves. I'm sure others out there have less expensive solutions. I went that same route for years.
One more thing. For the neck, this year since I have 2 buffs already, I'm planning on using one for a neck/face warmer.

Frank Whiton
10-08-2009, 11:31 AM
Hi Everyone,

When in Alaska I used several different ways to keep my hands warm. The best glove was the neoprene skin diver gloves with fingers. This worked very well for operating boats, pulling up anchors or any active that got your hands wet. They don't offer the feel that you get with fingerless gloves when fishing. The big disadvantage was if you removed one and put it back on you had an instant cold hand.

In my job we had technicians and mechanics who had to work outside all year around. That meant working in sub-zero weather. There were occasions that they had to chip whorefrost off of a tower so they could climb it. They had big mittens but some of the work required using bare hands. The best thing we found for this was chemical heat packs. They would used several to keep hands, feet and core warm. They can be expensive but it may be worth it for a few outings each winter.

For fishing I think Mojo has it figured out. Use fingerless gloves of wool or fleece and carry one or two hand warmers. You do have to be careful that some of the chemical warmers can get up to 130 degrees. So if you put one next to your skin and cover it with a coat, it could get pretty warm.

Frank

Rip Tide
10-08-2009, 08:14 PM
I use the fingerless ragg wool gloves for fly fishing, but when I ice fish, I use fleece gloves for a liner and rubber dishwashing gloves for the overmit
The dishwashing gloves come in some lovely colors too ;)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_G1LzgVgrWqk/Sp6u0dQb93I/AAAAAAAACJM/WylUlpjRYsQ/s400/lushlife+sponge+gloves.jpg

ksigtuck
10-08-2009, 09:58 PM
Mojo: I actually had looked at those gloves on line earlier today and liked the looks of them so I am glad to hear your reply. Now I will have to find time to make it down to the fly shop to try a pair on.

Frank: What are some name brands of the chemical hand warmers that you are talking about? Curious so I can look them up and see where I can buy some.
Thanks,
Tuck

mojo
10-08-2009, 10:16 PM
Mojo: I actually had looked at those gloves on line earlier today and liked the looks of them so I am glad to hear your reply. Now I will have to find time to make it down to the fly shop to try a pair on.

Frank: What are some name brands of the chemical hand warmers that you are talking about? Curious so I can look them up and see where I can buy some.
Thanks,
Tuck
For handwarmers, check out Zippo
http://www.zippo.com/Products/handWarmer.aspx?bhcp=1
or the solid fuel type which I use. It's rectangle about 4" long and a couple wide, has a red fabric cover, opens up and a black solid fuel stick fits in the middle. You light the stick until it glows red- like a charcoal briquette and place it in the cover and close it.
I can't remember what the brand is, but you can get them at Wally world. Fuel sticks are pretty cheap too.

Ard
10-08-2009, 10:19 PM
I use the fingerless ragg wool gloves for fly fishing, but when I ice fish, I use fleece gloves for a liner and rubber dishwashing gloves for the overmit
The dishwashing gloves come in some lovely colors too ;)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_G1LzgVgrWqk/Sp6u0dQb93I/AAAAAAAACJM/WylUlpjRYsQ/s400/lushlife+sponge+gloves.jpg

Rip,

You are indeed a fashion dynamo, and thrifty too.

Ard

mcnerney
10-08-2009, 10:44 PM
Expensive for gloves but I use Simms fingerless. http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/windstopper_half_finger_glove.html?id=atcvVDfm:67. 164.197.182
I had Orvis fingerless fleece and wore them out. Bought the Simms ($34) a couple years ago. I like their length and the windstopper membrane. Fleece dries quick too. Nothing to keep my finger tips warm except a pocket. I guess growing up fishing in cold weather, I figure cold fingers comes with the territory.
I also use a hand warmer. You light a stick and place it in the handwarmer in your pocket. Works ok for me.
For the head, Simms again. Last year at Henry's was bitter cold especially with the wind. Went into W Y and bought this at Blue Ribbon Flies.
http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/gore_tex_exstream_hat.html
One of the best damn cold weather investment I made. Goretex +fleece = damn warm.
$50 seems like a lot for a hat, but I'd rather spend the money and be warm, than a tight wad freezing my tush off. Same with spending $34 for fingerless gloves. I'm sure others out there have less expensive solutions. I went that same route for years.
One more thing. For the neck, this year since I have 2 buffs already, I'm planning on using one for a neck/face warmer.

Mojo: I use the Simms glove you have listed, I bought them in Alaska and they have worked great over the years. For a cold weather hat I use something similar to what you have listed but it is designed for dog mushers in Alaska, it works great when the temps drop.

Larry

HuronRiverDan
10-09-2009, 08:12 AM
Fingerless wool is what I use the most...Also found some fingerless that had thinsulate in them, use those when it's real cold...For the rest I have a wool "Radar O'Reilly" cap, and the zip neck heavy weight polypro under polyfleece pullovers...

Dan

ksigtuck
10-12-2009, 08:24 PM
Picked up a pair of Simms Windstopper fingerless mitts today. They feel really good on so I am looking forward to trying them out. They was a less expensive pair without the windblocker "technology" but I preferred the feel of the palm in the pair that I got (almost a rubbery feel) to the fleece palm in the other.
Thanks for the advice,
Tuck

michaeln
10-13-2009, 06:42 AM
Picked up a pair of Simms Windstopper fingerless mitts today. They feel really good on so I am looking forward to trying them out. They was a less expensive pair without the windblocker "technology" but I preferred the feel of the palm in the pair that I got (almost a rubbery feel) to the fleece palm in the other.
Thanks for the advice,
Tuck

I have the Simms Windblocker fingerless ones and used them at dawn last weekend at Sugar Creek Ranch. I was in my float tube and the air was in the low 40s. My hands stayed toasty warm, even when the gloves got wet. My fingers were a little cool, but not too bad.

I like the gloves a lot, glad I bought them.

ksigtuck
10-13-2009, 11:14 PM
I have the Simms Windblocker fingerless ones and used them at dawn last weekend at Sugar Creek Ranch. I was in my float tube and the air was in the low 40s. My hands stayed toasty warm, even when the gloves got wet. My fingers were a little cool, but not too bad.

I like the gloves a lot, glad I bought them.

Glad to hear this. The salesman told me this same thing but I was quite sceptical considering he was trying to sell them to me. I had a hard time wrapping my head around the fact that wet gloves could still keep you warm but he swore by it.
TUck

jcw355
01-09-2010, 11:42 AM
Hi Everyone,

When in Alaska I used several different ways to keep my hands warm. The best glove was the neoprene skin diver gloves with fingers.
Frank

This is what I've found that I like the most. 3mm thick, my hands get sweaty but not cold. I don't remove them unless its a bathroom break and have fished all day with wet gloves but warm hands. I can even tie on a fly with these. I've tried many gloves, getting wet hands in 40 degree water and air temperatures below freezing, theses work for me. I'm going to give scuba diving socks a try out to see if they keep my feet warmer.

Jackster
01-09-2010, 06:00 PM
I use the Simms fingerless gloves but the type with mitts that can go over the fingertips and thumbs.
Toasty stuff!

yatahey
01-10-2010, 09:20 AM
I've been using the layer system. First disposable latex gloves, next polypro glove liner, finally fleece or wool fingerless glove.

flytyer_neal
01-10-2010, 11:20 AM
In the digital printing world one needs to use a cloth glove, much like t-shirt material.....I put that on first, then overmit it with a surgical glove.....hands stay dry and don't build up alot of moisture due to the cloth under-glove

jcw355
01-23-2010, 09:05 AM
This is what I've found that I like the most. 3mm thick, my hands get sweaty but not cold. I don't remove them unless its a bathroom break and have fished all day with wet gloves but warm hands. I can even tie on a fly with these. I've tried many gloves, getting wet hands in 40 degree water and air temperatures below freezing, theses work for me. I'm going to give scuba diving socks a try out to see if they keep my feet warmer.

I forgot to add that the gloves I have do not leak cold water in. When they wear out I'll get another pair. I recently had a stocker rainbow poke a hole in my glove when I was handling it but fixed the hole with some UV wader repair. I've been very impressed with these. Now if there was a way to keep the feet warmer. Scuba socks didn't work for me.

axle27
01-23-2010, 02:03 PM
In case you are interested, Bass Pro has sale going on for the Kenai Glacier Gloves (fingerless). Neoprene palms and fleece tops. $9.94.

I picked mine up at the Baltimore location the other day.