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jackd001
07-01-2010, 10:38 PM
Hello,

I'm fishing for trout in northern Wisconsin. I'm buying a new reel and rarely ever have any fish run off all my line and go into my backing. Have you guys ever skipped out on say 20 yards of backing to keep a little bit more room on your reel?

MoscaPescador
07-01-2010, 11:00 PM
Hello,

I'm fishing for trout in northern Wisconsin. I'm buying a new reel and rarely ever have any fish run off all my line and go into my backing. Have you guys ever skipped out on say 20 yards of backing to keep a little bit more room on your reel?

I always try to leave a little extra room on all my reels from 3 weight to 12 weight. I am the worst when it comes to trying to manage my line when I am trying to reel in line. It seems to stack onto one side. By having that space, there will be less of a chance to have that stacked line rub against the line guard of the reel frame.

For example - My Abel Creek 2 Large Arbor reel holds up to 75 yards of 20 pound backing with a standard weight forward 5 weight line. I spun on 50 yards of backing because I had to take into consideration the longer belly of the line plus the extra stacking room that I wanted.

MP

hoshnasi
07-02-2010, 12:19 AM
Hello,

I'm fishing for trout in northern Wisconsin. I'm buying a new reel and rarely ever have any fish run off all my line and go into my backing. Have you guys ever skipped out on say 20 yards of backing to keep a little bit more room on your reel?

While you can skip, its generally a good idea not to so that the reel is more efficient and takes less rotations to pull in the line.

For example I just bought a 2-4 reel and if I didn't have that backing it would take a LONG TIME to reel in that fly line.

Ard
07-02-2010, 03:02 AM
Hi,

Please don't look at this as a disagreement with opinions already offered but perhaps as a different view.

When someone asks this type question my mind works like this; right now you don't have a problem with fish spooling you, but you will look at fishing magazines and DVDs and you will not rest until you start catching big fish (brown trout / steelhead / salmon / striper's, etc)................. So buy your reel a little bigger (next size up) than most guys who own your same rod, load it with all the backing it will hold and don't worry about the line binding on you while you're trying to crank in a big one, worry about the big one that runs downstream with a swift current that you just can't stop.

Most of the larger fish I catch I end up dragging into the shore line and almost always have 18 - 22' of line out the guides when I land the fish. Think about it, even if you are netting a fish while using a 9' rod, there is about 8' of line from the reel to the tip top, then another ten to 15' of line and leader extending from the tip top to the fish. So ................ I can't help it, I load the reels as if my next fish may break a record. feet

wjc
07-04-2010, 06:31 PM
Another way to look at it if you are using a WF line is to cut off some of the reel end of the fly line. If the line is 90' long and you cut 15 feet off the reel end, you can fit a whole lot more backing on, or make yourself more room on the spool.

With a 10' leader you can still get an 85' cast and besides, it'll be easier for you to cast into the backing.:D

Cheers,
Jim

Stan Wright
07-06-2010, 01:59 PM
On my freshwater reels... the backing is just to fill up the spool, making it easy to reel in the line.

On the saltwater reels you need that backing to keep from geting spooled. Even a small bonefish can take out all your fly line.

I kind of like that idea of using a reel one size larger.:thmbup: