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View Full Version : Landing Hand or Net



Frank Whiton
09-08-2007, 12:37 PM
Hi to All,

Has anyone used one of these gizmo's. One problem I have with it is you still have to squeeze the fish or tail it. I wonder if it is any better than the knot-less nets that are now out. They say it is good for Salmon but it would not work with some of the Salmon I have caught unless you tail it. You would still have to handle the Salmon with your other hand with nothing on it. It may be good for smaller fish. I don't really know with out some first hand experience. Any comments?

Landing Hand
http://shop2.mailordercentral.com/RogueAngler/images/landinghand.jpg

Detailed DescriptionThe best alternative to the traditional landing net! The Landing Hand is the catch and release angler's solution to getting a firm but gentle grip on fish. No more fumbling for a net and no more rough handling to get the fish and your fly separated from the mesh of the net. This fish-friendly "mitt" utilizes a knot-less mesh and clips to your belt for easy access. Simple to use - just slip your hand in, gently grip or tail the fish and admire your catch. Take a quick photo, then a kinder and gentler release. Comes with coil lanyard and designed for fish of all sizes - freshwater or saltwater.

Joni
09-08-2007, 07:22 PM
Those are cool, but I think I will stick with my custom built net. Why wouldn't one of those gloves with the rubber in the palm do the same thing?
Plus like you said most people use both hands when landing a big fish.
This is nice in that it would be real quick to stick your hand in in a hurry.
Maybe one on each hip and be quick on the draw...LOL Now that could work.
Or one of those gloves with the rubber palm on one hand and that thing for the other.

Trucha
09-09-2007, 11:54 AM
I think it is designed to catch anglers.

I believe a landing net would be easier on large fish, both to contain and unhook.

I can see putting a couple of beers in it and dragging it behind me in the current.

philthy
09-09-2007, 12:31 PM
I think it is designed to catch anglers.

I believe a landing net would be easier on large fish, both to contain and unhook.

I can see putting a couple of beers in it and dragging it behind me in the current.


Trucha,

Ya might be onto something there :wink:

Joni
09-09-2007, 06:11 PM
I think it is designed to catch anglers.

I believe a landing net would be easier on large fish, both to contain and unhook.

I can see putting a couple of beers in it and dragging it behind me in the current.

LMAO......you sure we aren't related LOL

troutbum20
10-05-2007, 09:09 PM
i am trying the Lippa tool so i dont have to handle the fish. anybody ever use one?

Frank Whiton
10-06-2007, 08:16 AM
Hi troutbum20,

I was just thinking about them last night. I have not used one but it should work well. Same holding principal as the Boga Grip. Please report back on how it works.

Frank

mojo
10-07-2007, 09:10 PM
I never catch anything so it doesn't matter.:surprise:

ezamora
10-07-2007, 10:14 PM
i think this is truchas' key word here.. containment.

eric
fresno, ca.

Fly2Fish
10-26-2007, 12:06 AM
i am trying the Lippa tool so i dont have to handle the fish. anybody ever use one?

I used mine for the first time extensively on the San Juan/NM a week or so ago. Although I expect many would use it in lieu of a net, I used it in conjunction with my net. Found that I could return good-sized (17-20") trout back to the water much quicker and in better shape using it than I could otherwise just using my net. BTW, didn't find the 8" Rising Crocodile "hemostat" particularly useful, and should have saved my money there, but the money was well spent for the Lippa4Life.

Frank Whiton
10-26-2007, 12:19 AM
Hi Fly2Fish,

Thanks for the report. I was under the impression that the Crocodile Hemostat was not worth the money. Did you have the Lippa on a retractor of some type? I think the Lippa would be good for in-shore wading down here in Florida. How big of a fish do you think you could handle with just the Lippa?

Frank

Fly2Fish
10-26-2007, 01:05 AM
Frank, you are exactly right about the Crocodile hemostat; I was using the longer (8.5") model, which you would think about right for 20" Rainbows, but of course the San Juan's mainly take midges, so using this tool was akin to driving a tack with a sledgehammer. Next time I'll drop down to one of my smaller hemostats, which will do a better job.

As to the Lippa, I first tried using it in one of my William Joseph Fusion Vest's tool holsters, attached to the coil-type zinger the Lippa came with. However, it didn't retain well, falling out every inconvenient moment you could think of (BTW, the 8.5" Crocodile hemostat fit perfectly in those WJ Fusion tool holsters, but as I mentioned, the Crocodile really doesn't cut it for me anyway). I ended up using the Lippa in the Rising leather belt holster it's optioned with along with its coiled zinger, and that worked perfectly (there is a Cordura belt holster version also, but having tried it, don't think it fits/retains the Lippa as well). Strangely, the instructions for the Rising leather belt holster stated that the model coming with a belt clip - metal - sholdn't be used with waders, but the model I got had both a metal belt clip and a belt loop. I presumed this caution was for the wear the metal belt clip would cause to waders, so I improvised a "rubber" for the unneeded but unremovable metal belt clip by cutting off a finger of a rubberized fishing glove and pulling it over the clip. Worked fine.

As to size of fish the Lippa could easily control, it worked easily with the 20" trout in the San Juan/NM, and had I had it with me when flyfishing the White River outside of Ketchikan in Alaska last August, would certainly have handled the pink salmon we were landing there as well. I found that - as recommended - using it on the lower jaw to keep the fish horizontally stabilized aided tremendously in removing the hook. I estimate it took me half the time it would normally take in removing the hook and returning the fish to the water.

Neil

Frank Whiton
10-26-2007, 08:57 AM
Hi Neil,

Thanks again for your report. I think anything that helps to land and release a fish with less effort is a good thing. The Lippa is something I would take along more often than I would a Boga Grip.

Frank

Fly2Fish
10-26-2007, 12:22 PM
Frank, one other thing I should add: The Lippa4Life comes in two versions - a reasonably-priced ($25 more or less) stainless(?) steel version, and an anodized aluminum version which I ended up buying after looking both over. The aluminum version is quite expensive, listing around $100, although "1st generation" models (which seem functionally indistinguishable to me from the latest model) seem to be available for the mid-$40s if you look hard enough. The reason why I went for the anodized aluminum version was not only that it was considerably lighter - a real factor considering how much I tend to carry with me during a day's wading - but also that its design seemed more suitable for trout than the steel model, a fact that Rising themselves confirm if you dig down enough through their literature. While as a freshwater flyfisherman the anodized aluminum version's better resistance to salt water corrosion than the steel version wasn't much of a factor for me, it probably would be for you.
Cheers, Neil