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harry_arthur
08-05-2010, 09:03 PM
Hey guys,

I'm new to this forum but certainly now new to the world of fishing. Have been a fisherman since I was 15 years old.

And I was just wondering if you guys release the fish you catch or what?

I know there's an issue of fish becoming depleted and many anglers are now employing the practice of catch and release fishing.

Personally I always release them and I'm also very careful not to hurt the fish too much and damage their internal organs.

MoscaPescador
08-05-2010, 09:15 PM
I am mostly catch and release. I have not killed a fish in the past three years.

There are a few times that I will keep fish. Lakes and streams that are regularly stocked are fair game. The fish that were put in were meant to be taken. Some high country Brook Trout lakes are filled to their capacities. Taking a fish won't hurt the ecosystem. Whenever I make a trip to some Margaritaville, the taking of a Dorado (Mahi Mahi) doesn't effect the ecosystem. Plus they make for some great fish tacos.

As a rule, I release all wild trout with the exception to some high alpine Brookies.

MP

cloudy2010
08-05-2010, 09:50 PM
I am mostly catch and release. I have not killed a fish in the past three years.

There are a few times that I will keep fish. Lakes and streams that are regularly stocked are fair game. The fish that were put in were meant to be taken. Some high country Brook Trout lakes are filled to their capacities. Taking a fish won't hurt the ecosystem. Whenever I make a trip to some Margaritaville, the taking of a Dorado (Mahi Mahi) doesn't effect the ecosystem. Plus they make for some great fish tacos.

As a rule, I release all wild trout with the exception to some high alpine Brookies.

MP

that might be right

twfitw
08-06-2010, 08:51 AM
I pretty much agree with MP... I hav fished for many years as a purely catch and release angler. I used to keep fish that would feed our domestic worker and her family back in South Africa. Since I have moved to Canada I have discovered how good the fish here tastes, especially walleye! I also really enjoy eating trout, and now I am pretty good at filleting a pike so I have begun to eat more fish. I live by a simple rule, "keep only what you can eat fresh." As for trout I realease all trout in the larger lakes and if I want to eat trout then I go and catch the fish in my personal dugout which I have stocked. There is a predominant mentality here amongst many people that you HAVE to keep what you catch and if you won't eat it, some body will. It's something I deal with a lot as people give me strange looks and think that I am mad when I come back from fishing with a ton of photos and nothing for the freezer. Being able to enjoy the fish we catch at the table is another element that makes this sport so great, but as with everything it must be done responsibly. My wife particularly enjoys it when I come home with fresh fish and cook it up for her, and sometimes she even insists I go fishing again!

jamieof
08-06-2010, 10:54 AM
For me, a little of both. We enjoy a nice meal of fresh trout, and also keep a few meals in the freezer for the winter months.

I release many that are hooked in a way the hook can be removed with minimal damage. However, the majority I've caught have the hook deep and I can't get it out without significant damage.

TW said:


There is a predominant mentality here amongst many people that you HAVE to keep what you catch and if you won't eat it, some body will.

I see much of the same where I live and never have agreed with it.

Jamie

oregonsteel
08-06-2010, 07:30 PM
I pretty much agree with MP... I hav fished for many years as a purely catch and release angler. I used to keep fish that would feed our domestic worker and her family back in South Africa. Since I have moved to Canada I have discovered how good the fish here tastes, especially walleye! I also really enjoy eating trout, and now I am pretty good at filleting a pike so I have begun to eat more fish. I live by a simple rule, "keep only what you can eat fresh." As for trout I realease all trout in the larger lakes and if I want to eat trout then I go and catch the fish in my personal dugout which I have stocked. There is a predominant mentality here amongst many people that you HAVE to keep what you catch and if you won't eat it, some body will. It's something I deal with a lot as people give me strange looks and think that I am mad when I come back from fishing with a ton of photos and nothing for the freezer. Being able to enjoy the fish we catch at the table is another element that makes this sport so great, but as with everything it must be done responsibly. My wife particularly enjoys it when I come home with fresh fish and cook it up for her, and sometimes she even insists I go fishing again!


Freezer trout/salmon suck!! If you arent going to eat it fresh put it back

jamieof
08-07-2010, 05:20 AM
Freezer trout/salmon suck!! >>>SNIP

I have to respectfully disagree

No, a frozen trout can't compare to a fresh one (and the same goes for any fish or meat), a meal of nice 8" Brookies in January or February can taste pretty darn good.

Jamie

oregonsteel
08-07-2010, 07:47 AM
I have to respectfully disagree

No, a frozen trout can't compare to a fresh one (and the same goes for any fish or meat), a meal of nice 8" Brookies in January or February can taste pretty darn good.

Jamie


Well if trout that have been in the freezer are tasty for you, good for you, more choices.

I know ALOT of people who end up throwing trout from the freezer away tho :eek:

jamieof
08-07-2010, 10:24 AM
SNIP<<<
I know ALOT of people who end up throwing trout from the freezer away tho :eek:

As do I. They stick 'em in a plastic bag and toss 'em in the freezer in July or August, and then come January or February, they're so freezer burnt they aren't fit.

However, freeze them in water, and it's the next best thing to fresh. Try it.

Jamie.

Brewmaster
08-07-2010, 08:54 PM
I release many that are hooked in a way the hook can be removed with minimal damage. However, the majority I've caught have the hook deep and I can't get it out without significant damage.

Jamie

Jamie,

I am curious....More than 99% of all trout I catch are hooked in the upper or lower jaw. This year I have had only 2 trout that were hooked too deep to easily release. If the "majority" of the trout you are catching are hooked so deep you cannot release them without significant damage; what are you fishing with? What type of fishing, what hook, and what fly/lure? Thanks,

jamieof
08-08-2010, 07:12 AM
Jamie,

I am curious....More than 99% of all trout I catch are hooked in the upper or lower jaw. This year I have had only 2 trout that were hooked too deep to easily release. If the "majority" of the trout you are catching are hooked so deep you cannot release them without significant damage; what are you fishing with? What type of fishing, what hook, and what fly/lure? Thanks,

Brewmaster, I'm fishing with # 12 - 16 flies in still water.

I really believe the trout in this little pond are starving as many have absolutely nothing in the gut. They take the fly deep and in one case last night with a 10" Brown, I actually had to cut the line as I couldn't get my fingers down to get the hook out. I actually now see the reason people carry forceps. It also caused an issue last night with a 20" Brown, which I'll post in another thread.

Jamie

Vans
08-08-2010, 09:48 AM
I have been releasing my fish for many, many years now. With the exception of an occasional halibut or tuna everything goes back.

tango59
08-08-2010, 12:14 PM
Contact Game and Fish in the area your fishing and get their opinion. On some waters they can tell you which and what size fish need to be taken.

branjg
08-08-2010, 03:50 PM
Since I enjoy the fight and not the taste, I always release them. I do fish some high country streams packed with 4"-6" brookies and never have a problem with people taking these all they want. In fact to each there own, although I hate to see 20" fish leaving the river. The rules are the rules and if they are followed who am I to disagree.

Sasha
08-08-2010, 04:29 PM
C&R here :cool:

chi flyfisher
08-15-2010, 01:58 PM
As do I. They stick 'em in a plastic bag and toss 'em in the freezer in July or August, and then come January or February, they're so freezer burnt they aren't fit.

However, freeze them in water, and it's the next best thing to fresh. Try it.

Jamie.

I don't keep trout and haven't for years. I used to be strictly catch and kill on put and take streams in PA. I used to haul out "my limit" all the time. I don't do it any more, especially on wild trout streams. It's been years since I've kept a trout. Just my choice.

Jamie - Have to agree with you on freezing fish in water. Have done it with Perch and the results are outstanding.

Cheers,
Mike

yatahey
08-15-2010, 02:28 PM
--------- Post added at 01:28 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:26 PM ----------

This is a fly fishing forum so I assume you are fishing with flies. If a fish is hooked deep cut the line as close to the fly as you can and release the fish. Chances are it will survive if it is not bleeding out.

I don't eat any of my catch, but have no problem with people who do so legally. I don't hunt either, but I'll eat any game animal happily.

In Colorado we have a "possession limit" that includes fish in the freezer. Of course it varies by species.

Ard
08-15-2010, 04:08 PM
C&R all wild trout and steelhead, stock trout are not tasty so I release them also. Have not harvested a trout since April of 1980, took three for a non fisher and regretted doing it.

I take salmon and use a vacuum packing devise to ready any that are not canned or smoked for freezing.

oregonsteel
08-15-2010, 04:36 PM
C&R all wild trout and steelhead, stock trout are not tasty so I release them also. Have not harvested a trout since April of 1980, took three for a non fisher and regretted doing it.

I take salmon and use a vacuum packing devise to ready any that are not canned or smoked for freezing.

Hatchery steelhead have MAJOR low level problems (genetics, things that don't affect fight or taste and are hard to see) but a nice chrome hatchery steelhead sure is darned tasty. So is a chrome hatchery salmon. High level hatchery salmon and steelhead are quite nice. High level meaning things you can easily observe.

MTskibum
08-15-2010, 05:43 PM
Usually catch and release, i might keep a few trout per year, less than 5. I keep most walleye that i catch.

I was fishing the coast in south carolina this past week, and released every fish that i caught, including keeper sized flounder and bluefish.

ant
08-15-2010, 06:39 PM
I usually C&R, but once in a while I'll keep some decent sized ones for dinner that night. Can't beat fresh fish. :thmbup:

JoJer
08-15-2010, 11:22 PM
For years I kept all the trout I caught, now the family doesn't want it anymore. So the trout go back, but I keep the whitefish for the smoker. I'd rather eat crappie, bluegill or bass. Been ages since I've had bluefish-YUM!
So far the salmon and steelhead have been pretty safe from me. HA!

Ard
08-16-2010, 02:00 PM
Hatchery steelhead have MAJOR low level problems (genetics, things that don't affect fight or taste and are hard to see) but a nice chrome hatchery steelhead sure is darned tasty. So is a chrome hatchery salmon. High level hatchery salmon and steelhead are quite nice. High level meaning things you can easily observe.

I agree,

I used to take a few Lake Erie Steelhead every spring and they were good. The King Salmon tasted like the muck on the bottom of the river so they went back. I thought the steelhead tasted like the farm raised salmon that was sold in our grocery stores back there. It was good but the PF&B had an advisory on consumption of Great Lakes fish so you didn't take too many.

raindogt
08-16-2010, 03:15 PM
I've been pondering this question for a few days--- can of worms.....

As for me-- both-- Part of me thinks that catch and release is fairly brutish, I understand the sustainability and preservation aspect of C&R-- but if we truly were concerned about conservation/ preservation, I'd think we'd just stay off the water all together. Also the question of invasive species comes to mind.

This all being said, I am mostly (almost entirely) catch and release. I suppose I must enjoy inflicting pain and fear on other creatures.... (tongue in cheek comment...)

As for keeping some-- I feel that it connects me (us) to the sport-- and ethically-- I am going to eat fish (this is a truth) -- when I catch and kill it myself I am sure that the process was done humanely.... not so with store bought/ restaurant bought fish.

As a side note-- went out with a friend on his boat this past weekend-- he's a tourney bass guy who professes his C&R'dom as bond..... -- 8 to 10 inch plastics and hooks suitable for a pirate hand.... The experience furthermore affirmed my own approach of genteelness towards the fish..... And, yes, he did leave three of 'em flopping around in the water trying to resuscitate... I was a bit horrified, and even commented a few times to him that that is why I send (barbless if possible-- not always-- I'm no saint... LOL) flies and streamers with a sensitive rod, and not plastics on a pole that has sensitivity of a tree stump spooled with 30Lb test. We're still pals-- just different takes.

Rifleman1776
08-16-2010, 03:48 PM
Our rivers have a bewildering set of regulations for designated catch and release areas, barbless hooks, size and slot limits, moon phases and so on. The rivers are stocked but we attract so many fishermen they would be depleted without the stocking.
When enacted the rules came into effect accompanied by much howling and groaning.
I have mixed feelings about it.
We will eat fish but it is unlikely we would eat as many as can be caught. OTOH, if I catch a trophy submarine rainbow I would like to keep and mount it. That will never happen. I'll have to settle for a fake made from measurements and a certificate showing I am a good boy for releasing it.
Our fisheries are in good shape and our tourist industry thrives, so on the whole it is probably a good thing.