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sesro1978
04-18-2008, 08:28 AM
Hi-

I'm looking to purchase a new pair of wading boots/shoes and need suggestions. I'm hoping to spend around $100.00 or less and do quite a bit of fishing in rocky streams in the northeast. So far I've been looking at the Orvis Ultra-light wading boots and the Orvis wading shoes (new this year I think)...

Any help in finding a good pair would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Sesro1978

yatesd
04-18-2008, 07:25 PM
My local flyshop seemed to discourage me from going with felt. I bought the shoes with the Aquastealth soles and then added studs (markings for placement are on shoe).

Simms Fishing Products : : Headwaters™ Wading Boot - AquaStealth® (http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/headwaters_wading_boot_aquasteath_.html)

I haven't had a chance to try them yet. I hope to do so this weekend.

Here's another option from LL Bean:
Ultralight II Wading Boots, Studded Siped Aqua Stealth Soles: Wading Shoes at L.L.Bean (http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=ultralight-ii-wading-boots&categoryId=45493&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&parentCategory=3937&cat4=1109&shop_method=pp&feat=3937-tn&np=Y)

FISHN50
04-18-2008, 07:46 PM
Look into the Chota STL Plus studded boots. I have a pair & I love them. They run about $ 125.00..

bmorejoe
04-19-2008, 06:45 AM
I second the Chota boots. Not only comfortable and well-made, they have a terrific speed lacing setup. You'll always be the first in your group to the stream.

BigCliff
04-19-2008, 04:38 PM
The Simms Freestone boots are tough as hell and pretty cheap too.

sesro1978
04-19-2008, 08:46 PM
The Simms Freestone boots are tough as hell and pretty cheap too.

I ended up picking up a pair of LL Bean Ultralight II (Aquastealth with studs); the price seemed decent, the felt supportive around the ankles and Bean's is pretty close to my house so if something goes "awry" - well, can't beat the guarantee :-)

Thanks all!

Frank Whiton
04-20-2008, 07:58 AM
Hi to all,

I have a question for FISHN50 and bmorejoe about the Chota STL Plus studded boots. I have read some reviews about the STL boot and people seem to like them. I have always stayed away from any shoe/boot that didn't have metal eyelets of some kind. The STL use a cloth eyelet and that seems to be a fault with the design. I just don't see them lasting as long as the rest of the boot. I know it is fast and I am not questioning how well they work but how long they will last. What do you guys think? Have you had yours long enough to know how long they are going to wear. I had one pair of tennis shoes with this style of eyelet and the eyelet failed long before the shoe was worn out.

Frank

Chota STL Plus Studded Boots
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/content/Item/83/04/54/i830454sq01.jpg

FISHN50
04-20-2008, 12:43 PM
Hi Frank
The laces are elastic & you have a push button slider doohickey to tighten them up so your never pulling them really tight. I can see where it can be a problem, but I'm on my second pair (only because I left the first pair home when I went on a trip & had to pick up the second pair in Colorado) & I use them 100+ days a year & have no trouble with the loops. I've replaced the elastic laces a few times with no trouble. The only trouble I have with them is that when they dry out they are a bear to put on over felt booties unless you soak them down to soften them up as they dry hard.

Neil

BigCliff
04-20-2008, 10:57 PM
Hi to all,

I have a question for FISHN50 and bmorejoe about the Chota STL Plus studded boots. I have read some reviews about the STL boot and people seem to like them. I have always stayed away from any shoe/boot that didn't have metal eyelets of some kind. The STL use a cloth eyelet and that seems to be a fault with the design. I just don't see them lasting as long as the rest of the boot. I know it is fast and I am not questioning how well they work but how long they will last. What do you guys think? Have you had yours long enough to know how long they are going to wear. I had one pair of tennis shoes with this style of eyelet and the eyelet failed long before the shoe was worn out.

Frank


Frank I can definitely identify with your take on this. If one of those nylon webbing loops fails, the boots will never really lace up right again. While the metal eyelets have potential to cause problems too (errant metal thrashes the lace to the point of failure), one could then mash down the metal and replace the laces. But a failed nylon loop is no good at all.

I can identify because I was working at a Patagonia FF boot dealer when they had a bad run of boots with pull on loops that would frequently pull out under normal duty. I still use any achilles area loop gingerly.

BlueDun
04-21-2008, 09:21 AM
The other problem I would be concerned about with the Chotas is that the laces are elastic. The lacing design looks similar to the Keen sandals that I wear. After several months, the elastic stretches and it becomes impossible to get the same degree of tightness that I had when I first purchased them.

Rudolf
04-27-2008, 07:43 PM
I also have the Chota boots for some four years now, they are great! Putting them on is a breeze. No problems with the laces or the eyelets. I don't do 100+ days, but where I fish is a lot of rocks and I don't see any damage. The studs, however, must be replaced soon.

bmorejoe
05-04-2008, 06:47 AM
Frank,
I suppose the elastic laces and nylon eyelets could wear out at some point but hasn't been an issue for me after 3 years with the boots. If I were to guess, the elasticity of the laces would be a problem earlier, but by then all the benefits of the boot (comfort, speed, traction, etc) would have been realized. Good luck with the decision.
Joe

FISHN50
10-01-2008, 11:41 AM
Well the Chota's bit the dust. I caught the heel under a rock & the whole sole came off. There is a metal instep in them & that was rusted & the material around it was deterioated. I called Chota & they said no warrenty, so I'm done with them. I picked up a pair of LL Bean's studded aquastealth boots & will give a report when I try them out. I'm starting to get more & more fishing stuff from LL Bean because of their warranty. & I pass the Freeport store a few times a year on the way to GLS.

axle27
10-01-2008, 11:52 AM
I got these for a decent price of $29.99. Good boot.

Allen Big Horn with Felt sole (http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,83289_Allen-Big-Horn-Wading-Boots-Felt-Sole-For-Men.html?cm_mmc=PaidPlacement-_-Google-_-WGOGB8-_-Allen_Big_Horn_Wading_Boots_-_(Felt_Sole_For_Men))

FISHN50
10-01-2008, 02:38 PM
With all the microbes etc that you can move from watershed to watershed, I wanted to avoid felt if I could. I finally found these in size 14 which is actually 1 size larger than my shoe size but they fit OK. I also am a firm believer in studs as they've saved my butt a few times.

axle27
10-01-2008, 03:42 PM
You can get the studded version for $10 more.

Allen Big Horn with Studded soles (http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,83288_Allen-Big-Horn-Wading-Boots-Studded-Felt-Sole-For-Men.html?cm_mmc=PaidPlacement-_-Google-_-WGOGB8-_-Allen_Big_Horn_Wading_Boots_-_(Studded_Felt_Sole_For_Men))

Fly2Fish
10-01-2008, 11:36 PM
I have a pair of Korkers Konvertibles, which feature interchangeable soles that (if you are more flexible than I am) can actually be changed while the boot is left on. Frankly, the ability to change soles from, say, a lug sole for lengthy walking on trails to get away from the crowd, then changing the sole to a studded felt or Acquastealth (or whatever you prefer of their several other soles) when you get to the water means I'd never think about another brand of wading shoe. Used to get tired of having to replace the entire boot when the felt wore out, or having to cobble up some way to replace the felt myself. Korkers makes several models of their interchangeable-sole wading boots, ranging from around $80 to double that.

Ard
10-02-2008, 04:11 AM
Go with a studded rubber sole if you can find one in your price range. If they run a little more save some more money because they are worth it. They will not cake up with snow on ya like felts and the studs will hold you fast even in the upper Penobscot. I don't know where you are at exactly but if it snows and the rocks are slick as grease get rubber and studs! Check with L.L.Bean online they have them I think.

Frank Whiton
10-02-2008, 11:52 AM
Hi Fishn50,

Is this the Bean boot you got?

Bean Ultralight II Wading Boots with Aqua Stealth and studs.

I read your post about the Chota STL Plus boots. It seemed that you really liked then and used them a lot. How old were they when the sole failed? I assume they were out of warranty?

Frank

MikeG
10-02-2008, 09:27 PM
Frank,

If you are interested in a good lasting boot where the lace system (meaning eyelets and laces will fail) look into Korkers. They make a specific wading boot called Korkers - Guide Wading Boot (http://korkers.com/product.php?recKey=38) It uses a steel lacing system. It would probably last longer than most lacing systems as long as you would not use it in saltwater. I actually own a pair of korkers wading sandals. I love the interchangeable soles. One week I could be in the boundary waters canoeing and portaging with rubber sole sandals. The next week I could be in the streams of Wisconsin with a felt sole going after smallies and muskies. The following week I could be in the Bahamas sailing on a boat with friends, with non skid boat shoe soles. Korkers really make versatile wading shoes.

Fly2Fish
10-02-2008, 10:06 PM
Frank,

If you are interested in a good lasting boot where the lace system (meaning eyelets and laces will fail) look into Korkers. They make a specific wading boot called Korkers - Guide Wading Boot (http://korkers.com/product.php?recKey=38) It uses a steel lacing system. It would probably last longer than most lacing systems as long as you would not use it in saltwater. I actually own a pair of korkers wading sandals. I love the interchangeable soles. One week I could be in the boundary waters canoeing and portaging with rubber sole sandals. The next week I could be in the streams of Wisconsin with a felt sole going after smallies and muskies. The following week I could be in the Bahamas sailing on a boat with friends, with non skid boat shoe soles. Korkers really make versatile wading shoes.
I really endorse what MikeG says. As is probably obvious from my previous posting, the easy interchangeability of Korkers soles makes them a slam-dunk winner when it comes to wading shoe choices.

Frank Whiton
10-03-2008, 07:56 AM
Hi Mike,

I am not looking for a boot right now. Just trying to get as much information in this thread as we can.

Comments to all,

I think that all fly fishers should be thinking about boots with out a felt sole. It is just too easy to pass organisms with them. Felt soles provide a real danger to any body of water that is not contaminated with whirling or other organism. The same goes for boat trailers that use carpet on the bunks. The bunk carpet may even be more dangerous than felt soles. Nylon nets or any woven net material may also be a problem.

Guys and Gals, this is my opinion with no scientific back up.

Frank

Fly2Fish
10-03-2008, 10:08 AM
I think that all fly fishers should be thinking about boots without a felt sole. It is just too easy to pass organisms with them. Felt soles provide a real danger to any body of water that is not contaminated with whirling or other organism.
Hi Frank,

Further to your comment, on my trip last July to the San Juan/NM, I used the studded Aquastealth soles on my Korkers. As a comparison, on my previous trip there a year ago, I had used their studded felt soles instead. It seemed to me that the studded Aquastealth had just as good a grip on those mossy slick boulders as did the studded felt. With that being the case, Acquastealth seems to be a better choice than felt, not only for the reason you mention (transmission of organisms) but for better wear as well.

Neil

yatesd
10-04-2008, 06:58 AM
I received an e-mail from Simms this week that stated they were going to sell no more felt shoes and use Vibram soles for their 2010 line. I just bought their Aquastealth boots this year, but it looks like Vibram will be Simms choice for tread going forward.

"Simms to Stop Using Felt by 2010:
Vibram to be "Sole Sole" of Wading Boot Line

DENVER, Colorado (Sept. 14, 2008) Simms president K.C. Walsh announced that Simms would stop using felt as a material for soles on its wading boots effective with the launch of the 2010 line.


Walsh made the announcement at a news conference held at the Flyfishing Retailer Expo. He said Simms decision to do away with felt is a result of the material being implicated in the spread of aquatic nuisance species and fish-killing disease. Walsh noted that anglers have always been among the nations first wave of conservationists, and with options to felt now on the market, anglers had a responsibility to both the resource and the tradition of angling to cease their use of felt.

We know felt is not the only material that has spread invasive species and disease, Walsh said, but felt is surely part of the problem. At Simms, weve decided to be part of the solution.

Late last week, national conservation leader Trout Unlimited asked at its annual meeting that wading boot manufacturers phase out felt by 2011. Simms is eager to lead the charge.


Walshs announcement comes as Simms unveils the worlds first fishing-specific Vibram-soled wading boots. For 2009, Simms will offer six boot models, a wading sandal and a wading shoe with soles featuring Vibram Streamtread soles. Additionally, Simms boots and waders are designed with CleanStream technology, a design philosophy that uses materials and production techniques making it more difficult for microorganisms to attach and makes wading gear easier to properly clean.

Simms and Vibram have worked together to produce an ultra-grippy, super-sticky rubber sole that works as well as felt in virtually all wet and aquatic conditions. The partnership between Vibram and Simms has resulted in a boot that combines the best performance features of felt with the environmental benefits of rubber. The new soles have been field tested extensively.

New Zealand has placed a ban on felt boots for the upcoming 2008 season. A number of U.S. states where aquatic nuisance species are found have reportedly discussed the possibility of outlawing felt-soles.

Additionally, Simms has agreed to work with conservation organizations and other companies within the fishing industry to develop a certification process to highlight gear designed to help prevent the spread of ANS and disease."
Simms Fishing Products : : News (http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/simms_news.html)

--
Doug

tie one on
10-04-2008, 12:52 PM
I started out with a pair of Ultralights from Cabelas. Fairly inexpensive,
but very light on the feet.

I used them for about two+ years & while I Salmon was fishing I stepped
into a silty area & my feet sank. Pulling my feet out pulled the sole off of
one of the boots.

I did some research on shoes & purchased a pair of Simms Freestones.
Best boots I have ever had. They maybe a little heavier of my feet than the others, but from what I'm seeing they wear like iron.

Tie One On-----------------------<*))))))))))))><

MikeG
10-05-2008, 08:52 PM
I started out with a pair of Ultralights from Cabelas. Fairly inexpensive,
but very light on the feet.

I used them for about two+ years & while I Salmon was fishing I stepped
into a silty area & my feet sank. Pulling my feet out pulled the sole off of
one of the boots.

I did some research on shoes & purchased a pair of Simms Freestones.
Best boots I have ever had. They maybe a little heavier of my feet than the others, but from what I'm seeing they wear like iron.

Tie One On-----------------------<*))))))))))))><

Do your Simms Freestones seem as though they give you more support than your Cabela's Ultralights? I currently own a pair of Ultralights, they are great for short excursions, a couple hours, but after fishing 8 hours they really start hurting my feet. I was looking to buy a pair of the Freestones.