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kfisher99
09-06-2010, 02:47 PM
I want to invest in a high-quality fly rod and start getting serious, but I definetly don't have enough cash for multiple weight rods. I do not want to be too limited on the types and sizes of fish I can go after. I do alot of traveling and I am around many different areas with many different species of fish. What is the best weight to get to give me the widest variety of fishing capablities? It's all freshwater that I'm doing. Mostly medium size trout and bass. I decided on an Echo Carbon 9 ft rod with a G-Loomis Venture reel. Just can't figure out what weight will give me the greatest amount of options. Input is much appreciated :).

Jimmie
09-06-2010, 03:12 PM
6 wt. is my answer. I've seen guys post some good size fish down to some very small fish on this site that were caught on a 6 wt.

boser
09-06-2010, 03:14 PM
I want to invest in a high-quality fly rod and start getting serious, but I definetly don't have enough cash for multiple weight rods. I do not want to be too limited on the types and sizes of fish I can go after. I do alot of traveling and I am around many different areas with many different species of fish. What is the best weight to get to give me the widest variety of fishing capablities? It's all freshwater that I'm doing. Mostly medium size trout and bass. I decided on an Echo Carbon 9 ft rod with a G-Loomis Venture reel. Just can't figure out what weight will give me the greatest amount of options. Input is much appreciated :).

5/6 wt rod is what I suspect would be ideal. Thats what I use here in the Midwest.If most of the fish I catch are 1-2 lbs. I have had a 3 lb Bass on and lost it of my own poor fish play. I needed to be more patient. I have used a 7/8 wt and it really is a great rod for carp, catfish and Bass of the larger 4-5 lb wieght. I say 5/6 wt would be the best because I suspect your fish to average 1-2 lbs. Please tell me I'm wrong.....hopefully they are larger (on average) then I would go 7/8 wt.

Hope that helps, Boser

Ard
09-06-2010, 03:33 PM
My vote;

9' 7 weight medium action:

Medium size creeks to large rivers East to West, easier to catch a small fish on a heavier rod than a heavier fish on a lighter rod. Use a long light leader for dry flies down to #20 and a short stout leader for big bass flies, streamers, and weighted offerings.

I have rods 3 - 9 weight and if I took only one on a cross country trip I would take one of the sevens.

You ask,

Ard

okuma
09-06-2010, 04:15 PM
Since you're including bass in your fishing, I would say a 7. A 6 would work but, if you hook up with a carp(love carp fishing):tongue: they will eat you alive.

ant
09-06-2010, 04:31 PM
I enjoy feeling the fight in the fish, so I would say a 6 or 7wt.

Anything over that and you lose feeling the fight on (my) typical sized fish and anything less and when you do latch into a big one you might overplay the fish and possibly kill it.

Like Ard said, I'd rather over-gun the fish than under-gun it.

chi flyfisher
09-06-2010, 04:38 PM
If you're trout fishing for 14 inch +/- 5 inches, you don't want more of a stick than a 6 wt. For trout fishing, a 9 ft. 5 wt. is considered by some to be the best all around length and weight rod. It'll work for smallies too but may be a little light. A 7 wt. is way too much rod for me for trout fishing. I do use a 7 wt. for Steelhead.

fredaevans
09-06-2010, 04:55 PM
My vote;

9' 7 weight medium action:

Medium size creeks to large rivers East to West, easier to catch a small fish on a heavier rod than a heavier fish on a lighter rod. Use a long light leader for dry flies down to #20 and a short stout leader for big bass flies, streamers, and weighted offerings.

I have rods 3 - 9 weight and if I took only one on a cross country trip I would take one of the sevens.

You ask,

Ard

As would I. NOW that said, if you can find a 5wt tip that will fit the 7wt (ya, ya, you have to play at your fly fishing shop or ask the manufacturer/seller for Ferrel info) you have the best of all worlds. First time I did that was a total accident, thank God 'A' would fit on 'B.' Soooo cool!
fae

milt spawn
09-06-2010, 05:21 PM
you WILL eventually build a quiver! we all have. 3, 5, 7, 9 would cover almost all the bases with the 5 and 7 being the workhorses. 3 for small streams, 9 for salt, stripers, etc... if you have to pick one weight, consider the size of: species, water, and flies you'll be using most often. milt.

bekiu002
09-06-2010, 05:43 PM
The only rod I use is a 6wt avid. I mainly fish for trout and bass (occasionally other rough fish like redhorse suckers) with it and had no real problems so far. The only time I have felt under gunned was when I hooked into a steroid using carp from the wrong part of town, who when landed stole my wallet...

Cabot

wjc
09-06-2010, 07:20 PM
I too would pick a 7 if that were the only rod I were to own. That would cover pretty much all the freshwater fish and you could throw big poppers for the smallmouths without popping your arm out of it's socket.

Then you'd have an excuse to take a vacation for bonefish, reds, snook and even some of the offshore schoolie sized fish, if you load the reel with gel spun. :D

Cheers,
JIm

FrankB2
09-06-2010, 07:39 PM
Depends on the rod model. I caught a 25" LMB on a Sage Z-Axis, and there as zero problem hauling that fish in. A 5wt Redington Classic Trout would probably be a different story, however. I fish when it's windy, so while I appreciate a delicate 4wt, a rocket-propelled 5wt like the Z-Axis is nice in those conditions. Swinging a heavy rod for a few hours isn't my idea of fun, especially if a lighter rod would do the job. Winston is beefing up its Boron series of rods to give it more rocket-propelled power, and that's probably an indication that they want to expand their customer base into that segment
that likes power and light weight. 5wt rods are the big sellers, and once you discover that a 5wt can do what was once reserved for heavier rod weights.... ;)

This guy was wrangled in nicely with a 5wt Z-Axis, and using 4X tippet (not so stiff that it can't protect lighter tippet):
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a80/PHEAA/0407091704b-1.jpg

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a80/PHEAA/BigMouths.jpg

14 inch trout don't feel like monsters with the Z-Axis, but they put a bend in the rod. I'll stick with a "depends" answer: wind conditons; target fish; shoulder
condition; size of fly being used most often; casting ability....etc.

Fly2Fish
09-06-2010, 08:17 PM
I agree with Chi Flyfisher; for the target fish (medium trout-bass), 5 or 6-weight seems ideal to me (although I don't have a 6-weight, then again I don't fish bass). Owning more 7-weight rods than any other weight, I think a 7-weight is way too much stick for medium trout, which I define as 11-15". The issue here is with light tippet protection; I suppose if you have a (rare) full-flex 7-weight, it might work, but most 7-weights I've seen tend to be fast-action rods that would be likely to break off trout in the smaller range of the target fish you mention if light tippet is being used, as for spooky trout.

However, another factor to consider is whether you expect to be fishing in windy conditions. In that case, a 7-weight would certainly be the recommended rod.

peregrines
09-06-2010, 09:56 PM
kfisher99

I completely understand the impulse to get the one "best" rod weight--- but to some extent it's like getting the one best golf club. The risk is that a compromise outfit for several different types of fish, flies, and conditions
might not be a great choice for any one set of specific conditions---

Maybe if you could tell us a little bit more about the different fish you plan to chase and the places you'll be chasing them it might help...

You might for example give some thought about getting one outfit now for trout, say a 9' 5 or 6 weight and use that for trout, panfish and small bass, and plan on adding an 8 weight down the road for throwing big stuff like bass bugs for bass, steelhead and light saltwater (redfish, specks, bonefish, striped bass, bluefish etc).

Many folks that fish for a lot of different things skip line weights and end up with 4, 6, 8, 10 or 3, 5, 7, 9

For your first outfit, I wouldn't go lighter than a 5 weight (to be able to throw a decent array of trout sized flies from small dries to hoppers, wets, weighted nymphs, streamers and buggers). Anything lighter than a 5 weight wouldn't be as versatile IMHO.

A 7 would be a good choice for smallmouth and largemouth, steelhead, shad, and chucking large streamers on big Western rivers or big tailwaters for trout. But, if you think there's a chance you'll be doing any saltwater fishing down the road, I'd lean towards an 8 weight rather than a 7 weight (for dealing with wind and a little more oomph with larger flies), and use it to chase those same freshwater fish too.

Another thing to keep in mind, is that in most cases you can get by very well with a less expensive reel for a 5 or 6 weight outfit because the demands on the reel from the fish you'll likely be targeting will be less. With a heavier 7, 8 and up weight outfits, freshwater bass won't be an issue, but if you chase steelhead or saltwater stuff, the reel becomes more important (smooth drag, corrosion resistance, quality of machining and components, backing capacity), and that can translate into justifying a bit more expense.

BigCliff
09-07-2010, 09:43 AM
Nobody sticks with just one rod, and we're going to give you enough info to have fun with this, so buy a 5wt now. We'll help you pick an 8wt when you're headed off to chase redfish/bonefish/steelhead/etc.

A 5wt will work very well for trout, will make bluegill more fun, and will land most bass just fine.

Frank Whiton
09-07-2010, 06:05 PM
Hi kfisher99,

So much good information here but it is really hard to pick one rod to do everything. You will end up with a rod too heavy for pan fish and smaller trout but not heavy enough for other larger fish.

If I were to buy one rod for what you describe it would be a 6wt medium fast. Then for Bass I would up line to a 7wt line. This covers the upper range well but not so good for pan fish. So I think you need to study where you travel to the most and get a rod that best meets the majority of the fish in those areas.

On the other hand I think Cliff is right on target. Get a 5wt to start with and then buy an 8wt for Bass and bigger stuff. This will give you a very good range of fish that you can go after including Saltwater.

Frank

MoscaPescador
09-07-2010, 10:42 PM
kfisher99

One rod? I might err toward a six. But after that, you may want another rod. You may as well start out right by starting a quiver.

Two rod quiver? I'm with Frank W. on this. The two most popular rods are 5 weights and 8 weights. The 5 weight will cover small stream to large river trout fishing. It is also a fun rod to use on Smallmouth Bass as long as it isn't being used with the terribly wind resistant deer hair flies. The 8 weight can cover light salmon, steelhead, Largemouth Bass, Striped Bass, and some lighter saltwater species. Start with a 5 weight, then invest in the 8 weight.

MP

flores81
09-08-2010, 03:35 AM
kfisher99

One rod? I might err toward a six. But after that, you may want another rod. You may as well start out right by starting a quiver.

Two rod quiver? I'm with Frank W. on this. The two most popular rods are 5 weights and 8 weights. The 5 weight will cover small stream to large river trout fishing. It is also a fun rod to use on Smallmouth Bass as long as it isn't being used with the terribly wind resistant deer hair flies. The 8 weight can cover light salmon, steelhead, Largemouth Bass, Striped Bass, and some lighter saltwater species. Start with a 5 weight, then invest in the 8 weight.

MP

That might be great tips