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  1. #1

    Default Where did the fish go???

    I was out fishing about a week ago at my closes Delayed Harvest trout stream. I was out all day long and saw not one single trout. I caught a couple of smallies. The water was on the warm side for trout, 70-ish maybe. I'm stumped as to where the trout went.....deep pools, farther upstream to colder water??

  2. #2

    Default Re: Where did the fish go???

    Quote Originally Posted by lthrnk03 View Post
    I was out fishing about a week ago at my closes Delayed Harvest trout stream. I was out all day long and saw not one single trout. I caught a couple of smallies. The water was on the warm side for trout, 70-ish maybe. I'm stumped as to where the trout went.....deep pools, farther upstream to colder water??
    Water around 70? I'd think those would be unhappy trout looking for cooler water.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Where did the fish go???

    Quote Originally Posted by williamhj View Post
    Water around 70? I'd think those would be unhappy trout looking for cooler water.
    Yeah...thats what I figured. Would the travel upstream to the higher elevations or just find the deepest coldest pools and ride out the summer?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    quiet corner, ct
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    Default Re: Where did the fish go???

    At a river that my club monitors, they figure that in the winter trout will migrate from 10 miles away to winter over in one certain pool.
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart

  5. #5

    Default Re: Where did the fish go???

    Trout at 70 degrees are going to be hard to find, plus it's may hurt the fish releasing them. The local dh streams near me (western nc) are usually pretty fished out this late in the season.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Where did the fish go???

    Quote Originally Posted by rccola712 View Post
    Trout at 70 degrees are going to be hard to find, plus it's may hurt the fish releasing them. The local dh streams near me (western nc) are usually pretty fished out this late in the season.
    To follow-up on this, unless the trout can't survive the warmer temps in the river, it's best to stop fishing when the water gets warm. If it's a 'put and take' fishery where the body of water can't support trout once the weather warms, then catch 'em and eat 'em. Otherwise, the fish will get so worn-out during the fight that they won't survive. You might see them struggle to recover or they just might get gradually worn down. A local stream near me is unofficially 'closed' for the year since the temps got so high and flows so low this summer, that the fish got stressed. By not fishing for them we give them a better chance of surviving. It's good for the fish and those who fish for them since we'll hopefully have a good fishery for years to come.

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