Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  43
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Pleasant Valley, MD
    Posts
    122

    Default School me on nymphs

    Ok, after several outings of confused and ineffective trout fishing I have decided to focus on one area for the time being. Nymphs. Its very tempting to buck some dries when I see surface action, but I will resist that urge for the next few outings in an effort to improve my overall trout game one step at a time.

    So I currently have 2 rods that I use for small streams. An LL Bean 5wt 86 streamlight ultra with a WF5F line, and a sage graphite 2 78 2wt with WF3F line on it. Both with mono tapered leaders. I have an assortment of nymph patterns in my box, some of which I bought 2 years ago and now dont know what they are called, others I have recently bought (rainbow warrior, midges, prince, Black stone nymphs) but all of which were recommended by local shopkeepers as effective in this area. Waters I am going to fish range from 10-15 wife 2 deep limestone creeks, to 30 wide faster flowing large creeks.

    Given what I already have, how would you guys recommend setting up to focus on nymphs? Im not opposed to small purchases but am not in a position for a whole new outfit currently. So, what are your suggestions for me? How do I rig up and what style do I try first? (More interested in tight line, no indicator fishing, but willing to try an indicator.)

  2. Likes tcorfey liked this post
  3. #2

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    Use the 5 wt, and save the lighter rod for dry fly situations. I'd say since you're on smaller, possibly clear water stay away from the tight line nymphing and use an indicator, it'll help you see takes you'd otherwise miss and help keep you from spooking fish because you're not fishing so close to you. For flies, just use one. Use a weighted fly by itself or with weight a foot or 18 inches above the fly, and attach your indicator 1.5-2 times the depth of the water you're fishing.

    When you buy flies don't just ask what patterns to use, do a little research and find out what insects the trout will most likely be eating where and when you'll be fishing. Then use flies to match what the trout are most likely eating. For instance at this time of year the main items on the menu will probably be midges and maybe blue wing olives, there will be other insects that may be active on some streams, but that's a start. Both those bugs are small, size 18 or smaller, so you'll need flies that are small and look kind of like a mayfly nymph or a midge larvae.

    Maybe that's simplifying it, but doing a little research and knowing what is hatching, when it's hatching, and what it looks like really helps. Then you can simplify your approach and you'll be more effective.

  4. Likes Bigfly, tcorfey, fredaevans liked this post
  5. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Truckee, CA.
    Posts
    2,306
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    P valley......
    Since fish feed 80+% of the time subsurface, it is the best approach......to catching fish.
    Stay the course.....get a bug net and use it....take a vial, grab a bug save it.
    Then take it to the store.......buy the fly that is closest. It's pretty easy really.
    Don't need to know the names of the bugs or the flies.....and just go fish.
    The info on not high sticking close with very clear water is good, but can be done, just fish the other side of the rock.....and move like a heron....(Study herons to learn how to wade....)
    Rig the other rod for a dry fly and carry it too....if and when they look up, you are ready.
    With this approach, you will have them on the ropes........or line...

    Jim
    Last edited by Bigfly; 03-13-2018 at 10:46 AM.

  6. Likes bumble54, tcorfey, dennyk, markfrid liked this post
  7. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Highlands Ranch, CO
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    Pleasantvalley,

    You will want to use that 5 weight. I have never used a 2 wt rod, so I can't comment on its effectiveness. Eventually you may want to get a 9' rod. Watch Craigslist in your area, and you can find some terrific deals. You will need some splitshot in various sizes, tippet material in at least 4-6, and maybe down to 7. Not sure about the trout you will be chasing. Then I suggest getting a thingamabobber in the 3/4" size. It is effective with most applications. I suggest white and either orange or pink. I usually use white, unless the light on the water makes it hard to see. The most important thing about fishing with nymphs is trying to get a drag free drift. You will need to learn how to "mend" your line, which is simply lifting the line off the water and flipping it up-current or down current depending on the situation. If you are fishing in 2' of water, I suggest setting your first fly at about 2' 6" below the thingamabobber, and having the second fly about 10" above that. It is okay to put a little "twitch" on the whole assembly. That can often trigger a reaction strike. But, for the most part you want that whole assembly floating drag free down the inner and outer edge of the "seams" on the river. You can probably get info on all of this on Youtube. And don't ignore throwing some streamers out there. It's a whole nother ball game, but an effective and really enjoyable way to catch fish. And, in general, streamer fishing will produce bigger fish. Not always, but usually. Good luck.

  8. #5

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    Bigfly's advice is gold dust as far as I'm concerned. Studying the insects you are trying to imitate and how they move and behave goes a long way to understanding how to fish them.

  9. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Truckee, CA.
    Posts
    2,306
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    Thanks....
    But I owe it all to Ralph Cutters underwater videos......
    Fishing the right fly is not the whole point, but fishing it correctly is.....
    You can put this off for years if you are lazy...but as soon as I started getting my fly in the right part of the water column and the way it should look, I have a hard time keeping them off my line.....
    Or, you can just throw a bugger all the time............
    Jim

  10. Likes bumble54, Joey Bagels liked this post
  11. #7

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigfly View Post
    Thanks....
    But I owe it all to Ralph Cutters underwater videos......
    Fishing the right fly is not the whole point, but fishing it correctly is.....
    You can put this off for years if you are lazy...but as soon as I started getting my fly in the right part of the water column and the way it should look, I have a hard time keeping them off my line.....
    Or, you can just throw a bugger all the time............
    Jim
    Others can point which road to take but your the one driving.

  12. Likes Bigfly liked this post
  13. #8

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    Quote Originally Posted by pleasantvalley View Post
    Ok, after several outings of confused and ineffective trout fishing I have decided to focus on one area for the time being. Nymphs. It’s very tempting to buck some dries when I see surface action, but I will resist that urge for the next few outings in an effort to improve my overall trout game one step at a time.

    So I currently have 2 rods that I use for small streams. An LL Bean 5wt 8’6” streamlight ultra with a WF5F line, and a sage graphite 2 7’8” 2wt with WF3F line on it. Both with mono tapered leaders. I have an assortment of nymph patterns in my box, some of which I bought 2 years ago and now don’t know what they are called, others I have recently bought (rainbow warrior, midges, prince, Black stone nymphs) but all of which were recommended by local shopkeepers as effective in this area. Waters I am going to fish range from 10-15’ wife 2’ deep limestone creeks, to 30’ wide faster flowing large creeks.

    Given what I already have, how would you guys recommend setting up to focus on nymphs? I’m not opposed to small purchases but am not in a position for a whole new outfit currently. So, what are your suggestions for me? How do I rig up and what style do I try first? (More interested in tight line, no indicator fishing, but willing to try an indicator.)
    You asked me to post on this thread about nymphing. You have gotten some good information.

    I suggest you you read this thread and read the other posts I refer you to in this thread. Take your time and try to apply some of the concepts.

    Nymphing - 2 must see videos
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

  14. Likes tcorfey, fredaevans liked this post
  15. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    West of Houston, Texas
    Posts
    712

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    For nymphs, you need:
    1) size 10 girdle bug...any color
    2) size 14 hares ear
    3) size 18 pheasant tail
    4) size 14 cased caddis
    5) size 14 uncased caddis
    6) size 18 thread midge...any color

    Throw some beads on any of these if you want. But theyll see you through most places you care to drop a line. Dont forget dropping them behind dries too. Cover 2 bases when the hatches are coming.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Its all in the reflexes.

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SF Bay area California
    Posts
    1,122

    Default Re: School me on nymphs

    I am going to try to keep this short.

    Before you go back on to the stream you should consider spending some time learning to read the water and taking the Stealth Skills Challenge. First make sure you have a good pair of polarized glasses. Using stealth, slowly walk the banks and try to spot fish. Look for tails moving or shadows, or the white of a mouth opening.

    Then observe the fish. Does it move side to side? or up and down? perhaps it is sitting still about 3 to 4 inches off the bottom and just opening it's mouth once in awhile. Don't forget to look in the shallow areas near the deeper areas and focus on current seams and bubble lines. Note it is easier to spot fish from a higher vantage point if you can achieve that. After observing a fish for awhile and noting where they are in the stream try to identify why the fish is there. Fish need food, oxygenated water, some cover and a place to hide if necessary. Now after studying the fish for maybe 30 minutes or more and identifying all you can about the fish and it's habits make sure you take some notes.

    Now it is time to check out your stealth game, see how close you can get without spooking the fish. You can tell when they spook because they change their behavior. You don't want to chase them off their spot you just want to see their behavior change. They may sulk on the bottom or move behind a rock or another obstruction. Stop trying as soon as their behavior changes because the game is over. Now you can't fish for that fish until later because it is spooked but, you now have learned about how close you can get. That will be helpful for you later while you are fishing.

    Some notes:
    If it can be avoided try not to wade into a creek if it is narrow and if you do wade then do it in moving water while fishing upstream so there is a lower chance of you pushing shock waves in to the water ahead of you. If you do get in the water do what was recommended earlier try to seine or somehow identify what insect life is active. Take a notebook and record what you learned, if possible take some pictures and study them. If you see fish rising take some pictures or a video and review where the fish are in the stream. Figure out why they are where they are. This will assist you later as this studying is to learn how to "read" the water so you can identify fishy places in the future.

    If you finish your observations and stealth skills challenge and you have some time left in the day go get your rod. In streams like you mention 10' to 30' wide and only 2 feet deep I prefer to use a dry dropper setup to search for fish rather than an indicator setup. This allows you to search the top of the water and the water column at the same time. So if I was just going to fish in a river or creek like you describe then I would do some on stream research or absent that info I would look at some hatch charts for the creek. I had a few minutes so I looked at a hatch chart for Gunpowder River in Maryland and this is what I found:

    "Around the middle of March Little Black Caddisflies, or Grannom Caddis, start hatching along with some Blue Quill mayflies. The caddis hatch last just over a month. The Blue Quills can last almost two months. Little Brown Stoneflies will start hatching about the middle of March and last over a month."

    Armed with that information I would consider using a 9 foot tapered leader in 4x to a Black Caddis pattern in size 14 for a dry and off the bend of the hook 2 feet of 5x tippet to a size 18 or 20 black midge (I use a big eye hook on my midges). You may have found something different to use after your skills challenge but I am using that fly selection as an example of what I learned by reading the hatch chart.

    Using the knowledge you learned earlier in the day start searching for trout. If it has been a long enough period perhaps you can find the fish you saw earlier and this time convince him to eat your fly.

    Regards,

    Tim C.

  17. Likes ralphs007, Tonyfishslayer, dharkin liked this post
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Old School
    By siege in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 07-08-2013, 08:31 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-03-2012, 08:30 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-03-2012, 08:30 PM
  4. school
    By grassonfly in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-03-2011, 12:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •