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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    Nobody is saying we should just fish for big fish........although that was kinda the idea of the post.
    Personally I'm over little fish.
    They are beautiful, and I admire their spunk......but if I can get my thumb up over it's back, it hasn't grown enough for me.
    I want a fish that will kick my butt.....that will take names....that will make me feel like I just started fishing!!!!!!
    Had one on a while back who nearly caused fibrillation.....I had to set down on a rock after a hundred yard run, and let the shakes fade......
    I know a base hit can win a game, but a home run is more fun. And much harder to accomplish at will.
    Enjoyed Corn's take on it..........Same as mine.......
    We mostly shoot ourselves in the foot just walking around flogging them.
    I have said before I am the president of the universal fisherman's assoc. We can ALL just bumble around, and get lucky from time to time.....but, less bumbling gets you a better stats. If you think more about your approach/execution it helps.
    This the difference between where I started as a youth, and my GRRRRRizzled present stalker mode......
    When I am in big fish mode, it's much more likely that I will be ready for him. As opposed to going through the motions and getting a brief surprise visit.
    One thing that has helped a lot, in getting more big fish, is a bigger stick. Not only do I tie into more sizeable fish, I land more too.
    It doesn't matter how big the water is, I'm looking for the anomaly fish......he could be a Kyped 12"er in a step across creek, or a leg sized disgruntled Toad in the T. If you don't practice for your nemesis though, you probably won't be up to it when it happens.
    It's not just hunting them.....it's being ready as well........oh and....strip set, not rod set.

    And if he does follow....let him eat it.

    Jim
    Last edited by Bigfly; 12-05-2018 at 09:40 PM.
    The bar isn't set by the fish we catch, but by the one's we don't.

    Bigfly

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    I love resources like this forum.

    Usually, time on the water is the best method of getting experience, but sometimes information like the one provided on this post is also worth it's weight in gold.

    So, to clarify.....

    Big fish are big for a reason, because they're not dumb. They find areas that a typical fly fisherman will over look, simply because they don't want a fly stuck in cover, and having to retie an entire rig.

    Big fish also eat small flies, but the stars need to align.

    But on the contrary, bigger fish tend to try to expend the least amount of energy to get fed, which means that chucking streamers (during optimal conditions, see above) might get fish to go.

    And, presentation is key. You're not going to fool and old wise fish with a crappy mend, especially if you never approached the water with stealth in mind.

    And of course, if the fishery doesn't support larger fish, the odds are not in favor of the angler.

    Bigfly, you've given us a copious amount of information, which definitely sinks in. Thanks.

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  5. #23
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    Ha, I think Corn fed was copious.....
    And spot on....
    Pretty sure I didn't add anything new on this subject.
    My only passionate input, is that mostly, we stand in our own way, in the pursuit of fish of dreams.
    The emotional fisher runs to the water on the trail, and then wades like a buffalo.....
    Smarter fishers sneak through the bushes, and ambush the big guy with exactly what he was just looking for.....
    That's how fishing gets easier.
    I tell all that will listen, if you make the best drift you have ever made, everytime....and expect a fish each drft, you will raise your stats and maybe land him as well.
    I wasn't just throwing Darkshadow a bone either...any forum members that wander this way, give a call and we will walk some water..

    Jim
    Last edited by Bigfly; 12-05-2018 at 09:41 PM.

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  7. #24
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    Lol. I've been over catching sub average fish for decades and I agree about not just fishing for big fish. But you'll never catch me targeting 12" risers when +18" is the average fish. I'll leave them for the dry only guys oke:.

    Don't be mistaken. You don't need a tailwater to learn how to sight fish. It makes it easier in just one aspect, seeing fish. All the other aspects can become MUCH tougher. I would recommend staying away from "those" waters for the beginner unless they are resilient to discouragement. I've had countless conversations with folks in "those" parking lots. "All those 'big' @$!# fish just sitting there and I caught nothing" or " just small ones". Lol "Just put in your time"

    You can learn in any clear and even semi clear water. Slightly off water makes finding fish harder but also makes it harder for them to see you. More importantly they move around more as they feel less exposed. Actively feeding fish are spotted with ease. Advantage you! Stop and observe. Isn't a few minutes worth a big fish?

    Sight fishing is a learning process and will improve your game 100 fold. You will see exactly how fish rest(!), feed, react to being lined, hooked, and inspect food before refusal. Even where your nymphs truly are with relation to your line/indicator during a drift depending on rig (very surprising for many). How many fuitless blind cast before you mess with weight, depth, fly, etc.? 10, 50, half a day? Sight fishing has instant feedback. That feedback as to how that fly needs to be presented in those variables becomes ingrained so when you go to just leisurely fish you will be more effecient from the start.

    I hear that story about someone losing a big fish. "The big one got away"....for a reason. No room for mistakes. Until you've practiced with those big fish losing them is all too common.

    I can still recall my first encounter. 11 years old, wet wading in Cheeseman Canyon with dad, feeding RS2s to visible fish but this one was huge, HUGE I SAY. Lol Was that a take? Oh heck yes! But it didn't last long. No idea what to do as it just didn't act like all the others. It went for broke and that's what happened, it broke my line. I can still see my dad laughing as I said "It's not funny!" while sitting front seat on the emotional roller coaster. When you sight fish you can always console yourself there is always another in the near future but I still get a little butthurt. Lol

    One summer of pure sight fishing is worth decades of blind casting. I will go as far to make the assertion that anglers experienced in sight fishing out catch in numbers and size than those that are not. Why? Because of all the advanced lessons that sight fishing teaches. They are better at judging necessary rigging requirements, understanding how that rig is moving and location, have a strong knowledge to the best lies and not so obvious lies, and know when to move on; just name a few. Any angler will pick this up over time but if you're looking to improve your game, IMO, this is where to start.

    Anglers are looking at depth, rocks, seams, bugs..... Why not look for a target? Isn't that the real goal of angling?

    Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
    Nice fish! Do you have anymore pictures of it lying in the dirt?
    As publicity increases so does the propensity of tripping over yards of mono attached to a Dipsey sinker.

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  9. #25

    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    Exercising your ability to see and understand what is on and under the water is a critical move to becoming a better and more proficient angler, both for seeing fish and your fly. Larger rivers with deeper faster water where the big wild fish will commonly hold is more about reading the water than being able to see a fish that is un-see-able. Like y'all have stated they got and stay big for a reason and do not forget we are but a simple predator...The natural predators have far superior methods to catch and not release. This is another complete angler situation where all skills combine to make an angler more able to connect with the largest of the system. The fish from the fast depths that rarely show themselves are a special prize. Most big fish will at times move into areas where they are potentially visible and this is a prime time to strike for sure.

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  11. #26
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    Nov 2009
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    Walsenburg, CO
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    Patience is the best friend when fly fishing. A little patience and the bigger fish will come. Fly tying and fishing has taught me more patience than I probably deserve.

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  13. #27
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    IMG_20181202_105548_665 by James Landis, on Flickr

    Not my favorite grip, but a nice grin, from a forum member who came for counseling.
    Come to find out, when you work the problem, the problem goes away........he is now a catcher, not just a fisher!

    Corn did make a good point...
    I have mentioned here that I teach one-drift, one-change.
    I say if I make a drift and get neither hung up, or hooked up, I make an adjustment.
    NOT 200 MORE DRIFTS THE SAME WAY!
    Maybe add more depth...say raise the indy a couple inches...another drift, another change.....in the same seam..
    After 3 or so changes, I'll add weight.....repeat till you succeed!
    After a while (a couple seasons) you will be able to see the seams and guess the depth and weight more often on the first try. This how I have gotten good at one fish/one drift. I can't always do it at will, but I do it so often that clients are amazed how easy fishing looks. Then they fish for 3-4 hours without a take.
    We fish bigger water too that hides the fish. But they are there....where else would they be?
    The number one reason most fishers don't hook up, is they don't make logical changes enough.
    They just make another drift........Lazy doesn't get you much in life, but don't complain about fishing if that's your approach.
    Mostly it's not about the fly (food), it's how you deliver the Pizza......
    Here, Walter wants a large three-meat, delivered so that he doesn't have to leave the couch.
    Edit......but they do like the
    little desert tidbit off the back too.....
    I do try to please..

    Jim
    Last edited by Bigfly; 12-07-2018 at 10:24 PM.

  14. #28

    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    There are no big trout. Go fish salt!

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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  16. #29
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    Oct 2012
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    I think location is the biggest thing. If you're fishing systems where the trout do not grow very big, then chances of catching a trophy are near nil. I've caught 30" fish on a size 16 nymph, I've also caught 8" trout on a 5" streamer, so I don't believe fly selection is nearly as important as finding a big trout's hiding spot in a system that has the nutrients necessary for a trout to grow large.
    Danny

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  18. #30
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    Default Re: Catching Bigger Fish

    Quote Originally Posted by huronfly View Post
    I think location is the biggest thing. If you're fishing systems where the trout do not grow very big, then chances of catching a trophy are near nil. I've caught 30" fish on a size 16 nymph, I've also caught 8" trout on a 5" streamer, so I don't believe fly selection is nearly as important as finding a big trout's hiding spot in a system that has the nutrients necessary for a trout to grow large.
    I remember going on a trip with a friend who guides in early Spring who had a no-show and he had a free backseat for my buddy. This guide was well known for throwing 'big baits,' and I was anxious to see his approach to throwing them.

    He made 3 casts with it ALL day, 2 of which, he nailed 6 and 7 pound fish, almost back to back. Pretty good ratio.

    The rest of the time, we junk fished, putting other 6s and 7s on the boat with 'conventional' lures.

    At the end of the day I told him that I always was under the impression that he'd throw big baits all day long.

    I also asked what he thought about the approach that the individuals who do throw a pound a half bait all day long have, and he chuckled and said,

    "They must be working on their shoulders and arms."

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