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Thread: what is it?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    southern Ohio
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    Default what is it?

    I'll admit it right up front - I know almost nothing about identifying the "bugs" I encounter or hear about being imitated.
    I'm in hopes I can gain some knowledge from this forum.

    Saw a few of these when I was fishing at the local lake the other evening and am curious as to what they are and if an imitation of them would catch fish.

    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    quiet corner, ct
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    Default Re: what is it?

    The "little black stonefly"
    The most common hatch this time of year
    There's brown ones too but they're still collectively known as "black"
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    4,019

    Default Re: what is it?

    Yup, what Riptide said.

    The nymphs of early black and early brown stoneflies are active this tiem of year. They're dark and a lot skinnier slender than most other stonefly nymphs.
    A "Pheasant Tail Nymph" tied with dark brown turkey tail fibers is a good imitation. A 3xl size 14 hook weighted with nontoxic wire and a black bead head helps to to get it down in fast water that the nymphs prefer.

    Other dark nymphs about that size tied with peacock herl like Prince Nymphs, Zug Bugs, wire bodied stuff like Black Copper Johns etc or dubbed dark black or brown patterns are a good choice.

    Here's a better imitation tied up by member Smalliesrule for our Nymph Fly Swap that's in progress:



    Personnally I haven't had as much luck with the dries for this hatch but there's a Black Caddis (Chimera aterima) around size 16 that hatches about the same time, so some dark caddis patterns are worth trying too.

    A better imitation for the adults is a size 16 black or dark brown Dancing Caddis on a 2xl or 3xl light wire hook (like a Tiemco 200R). If you tie, here's a link to it in the pattern library: Dancing Caddis
    Last edited by peregrines; 03-07-2012 at 03:23 PM. Reason: To give proper credit to Smalliesrule!
    Mark

  4. #4

    Default Re: what is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by peregrines View Post
    Yup, what Riptide said.

    The nymphs of early black and early brown stoneflies are active this tiem of year. They're dark and a lot skinnier slender than most other stonefly nymphs.
    A "Pheasant Tail Nymph" tied with dark brown turkey tail fibers is a good imitation. A 3xl size 14 hook weighted with nontoxic wire and a black bead head helps to to get it down in fast water that the nymphs prefer.

    Other dark nymphs about that size tied with peacock herl like Prince Nymphs, Zug Bugs, wire bodied stuff like Black Copper Johns etc or dubbed dark black or brown patterns are a good choice.

    Here's a better imitation tied up by member Stimulator2 for our Nymph Fly Swap that's in progress:



    Personnally I haven't had as much luck with the dries for this hatch but there's a Black Caddis (Chimera aterima) around size 16 that hatches about the same time, so some dark caddis patterns are worth trying too.

    A better imitation for the adults is a size 16 black or dark brown Dancing Caddis on a 2xl or 3xl light wire hook (like a Tiemco 200R)
    Hey HEY HEY! I tied those little black stone flies
    Stan SmalliesRule

  5. #5
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    Jun 2008
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    4,019

    Default Re: what is it?

    Sorry Stan-- fixed!
    Mark

  6. #6
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    Default Re: what is it?

    I tied a dozen black stone dries yesterday too. Plus the black stone nymph patterns have been working a treat with steelies all over the Great Lakes, it seems.
    - A.J.

    Working out a way to convince my university to allow me to hold my TA office hours on the nearby creek...

  7. #7

    Default Re: what is it?

    Stone flies only hatch moving water and cant live in sandy/silky ect water... so that leaves only one conclusion, that did not come from your "local lake" that came from your "local river"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Default Re: what is it?

    Insects (Insecta) Stonefly larvae (Plecoptera) Stoneflies ... Some species may be found along lake shores with wave action (Peckarsky et al. 1990).

    With that out of the way, did the fly shown have two tails? From the picture it may also be a Dobson Fly, female. (grown up Hellgrammite)
    http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=24405&dateline=129884  8088
    Great Fishing
    Der Alt Jaeger
    Chuck S

    "I've traveled many roads and some weren't paved."
    Will Rodgers

    http://fishing-folks.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
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    Default Re: what is it?

    Chuck, and Mike,

    I think that a Dobson Fly has more of a delta wing when at rest. That sure looks like a stone fly but it's true that they like moving water as per iceclecreek's post. I don't remember stones on still water but there may well be populations that live in lakes that have a rocky shore line strata. So.............Mike, is the lake a rocky bottom near shore?

    Something else I'd ask is, how big was the bug in the picture?

    ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  10. #10
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    Default Re: what is it?

    Dobson flies are huge and ugly. Unmistakeable. The stuff of nightmares.
    Nocturnal too.
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart

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