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Thread: do you know what this is ?

  1. #11

    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Quote Originally Posted by kicker19 View Post

    I've shown those same pictures to several folks at the local fly shop and they said the first one was a caddis (they also showed me how to tie a few!) I have not used the caddis patterns yet but I have used a griffins knat as a substitute with very good results. Strangely I have not seen any fishing rising to the mayfly.

    ---------- Post added at 01:09 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:59 AM ----------

    I just searched the alderfly and I don't believe it's that. The alderfly almost looks like a stonefly, just shorter and more broad. Plus it seems thier eyes are not that large
    That's why I was asking if these came from a warmwater river (or even a lake/pond). I have never seen a trout stream (coldwater) dwelling caddisfly with giant bugeyes like that. In that first picture, if that is the abdomen (hidden behind the underwing) with a long stinger-like (although probably a sex organ) appendage protruding... Then I'm pretty sure that it is not a caddisfly.

    Likewise with fly #2... 100% positive that it's a freshly hatched dun... 100% positive that it's a female... about 75% sure that it's a Stenacron (although the barring in the wings is more extensive than I'm used to seeing)... 0% sure on interpunctatum (just my best guess).

    My amateur entomology only extends as far as I need for fly-fishing in cold rivers and streams though... so if these insects came from warmwater, all bets are off.
    "Joe"

    "We fish for pleasure; I for mine, you for yours." -James Leisenring

  2. #12

    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    the one thing I do know about various bugs is this...that there are literally thousands of variant species and sub species...

    the "caddis" is a bit different than I am used to seeing...I wish I was familiar with the "alderfly", but Im not..

    bottom line...if this came from a place you fish...tie up something that looks like it and give it a pitch...

    I made up a caddis recently that could be easily adapted to something like the bug you got that pic of...you can easily add a few "sprigs" of feather barbs for antennae if you like...I do this only when fishing really slow water...



    this one is patterned after a slightly darker version...maybe try some mallard CDC or a lighter flank feather for the wings...in this one I used a bronze chest feather from a drake mallard...

    here is an SBS if you are interested for this fly...

    good luck...and thanks for taking the time to take and post the great pics...t

    wandering monks pattern of the month2 | tales of a wandering monk

    ted...trout bum/wandering monk
    public water 20"er
    public land pope & young

    Breac à linne, slat à coille is fiadh à f́reach - mèirle às nach do ghabh gàidheal riamh nàire.
    a fish from the river, a rod from the woods and a stag from the mountain , thefts ne'er a Gael was ashamed
    ...and old gaelic proverb...

    my blog & website
    http://wmflyrodco.com/

  3. #13

    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Lovely pattern Silvertp

  4. #14
    Join Date
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    metro atlanta
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    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Quote Originally Posted by stenacron View Post
    That's why I was asking if these came from a warmwater river (or even a lake/pond)
    Sorry about that I over looked that question. It is a cold water river (chattahoochee river, near Atlanta) the river has several dams that flow pretty often, during the winter I'd guess to water gets to the low 40's, during the summer upper 60's (I'm not exact on this)

    Silvertip8k: I'd have to say that is a beautiful fly, I believe it would do very well in this region

    On certain days when the bug life is substantial on the water, I see so many bugs I cannot identify (or catch; if you could imagine a fisher scurrying through a river grabbing at things at the surface, you can picture what I look like some days)
    "The core of mans spirit comes from new experiences" - C.J. McCandless

  5. #15

    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Although not targeted for your area of the country, here's a link to the Upper Delaware River Insects page which has; pictures, scientific names, common names, key field markings, etc. The Upper D is a large tailwater river just like the Chattahoochie so there's probably a fair amount of overlap...at least to the Genus level.

    link: Stenacron canadense, Light Cahill
    "Joe"

    "We fish for pleasure; I for mine, you for yours." -James Leisenring

  6. #16
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    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Thanks stenacron. It may be a different region but I can still learn something from it. Very helpful !
    "The core of mans spirit comes from new experiences" - C.J. McCandless

  7. #17

    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Quote Originally Posted by kicker19 View Post

    Thanks stenacron. It may be a different region but I can still learn something from it. Very helpful !
    You're welcome. Also, if you haven't already seen it, TroutNut.com is an amazing resource as well: Aquatic Insect Encyclopedia: The real flies we imitate when fly fishing
    "Joe"

    "We fish for pleasure; I for mine, you for yours." -James Leisenring

  8. #18
    Join Date
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    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    That site is very good. I learned about it from another thread. I tell ya, over the past few days the amount of bug sources being shared on this forum have been substantial. Truly exciting stuff
    "The core of mans spirit comes from new experiences" - C.J. McCandless

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Grand canyon of Pa.
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    1st one is called a speckled peter and is a caddis
    2nd one is a light cahill
    march brown is more reddish in color and has 3 tails.
    alder fly would eat those others for dinner. and is a relative to the helgramite (aka: wooly bugger)
    sandfly/ bob
    (www.bigmeadowsflyshop.com)
    N.J.B.B.A. #2215

    I did not escape.....they gave me a day pass!
    from the outer edge of nowhere
    fly tying and fishing Gillie..

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    quiet corner, ct
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    Default Re: do you know what this is ?

    Quote Originally Posted by sandfly View Post
    alder fly would eat those others for dinner. and is a relative to the helgramite
    Just an FYI
    Here in New England the bug that most people call a zebra caddis is commonly called an alder fly (2 words)
    It's not the same animal as the alderfly (one word) that's a relative of the helgramite/Dobson fly.

    Alderfly



    Alder fly

    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart

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